Tags: sharing

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Fix the internet by writing good stuff and being nice to people · Woman. Legend.Blog

Whereas before content used to be spread out on numerous domains in numerous ways, content now mostly makes its home on the three domains that are most hostile to thoughtful human discussion: Twitter, Medium, and Facebook.

So what? you may ask..

Think about how many times you’ve tweeted. Or written or commented on a Facebook post. Or started a Medium draft. These are all our words, locked in proprietary platforms that controls not only how our message is displayed, but how we write it, and even more worrying, how we think about it.

Why I am a web developer | Seldo.Com Blog

I think it’s worth revisiting this post by Laurie on a regular basis for a shot of perspective and inspiration.

The web saved my life and then built me a new one. A single living entity, it touches everything in the world and is always getting better — and I can help. I owe it so much; if I can help it out, make it better in any small way, how can I possibly refuse? And if I can make it easier for other people to help make it better, then my efforts are multiplied.

Introducing the Web Share API  |  Web  |  Google Developers

This is an interesting API that just landed in the newest version of Chrome behind a token—it gives you programmatic access to the OS’s share functionality via a (secure) website.

Paul finishes this rundown with the interesting bit:

Future work will also level the playing field for web apps, by allowing them to register to be a “share receiver”, enabling web-to-app sharing, app-to-web sharing and web-to-web sharing.

Maybe I’ll get to see a native “huffduff this” option in my lifetime.

The Amazing Women of CSS

Rachel lists some of the best CSS developers working on the web today:

A Code Review, Or Yet Another Reason to Love the Web | Brad Frost

I love this back and forth between Brad and Jonathon. I think they’ve both got some good ideas:

  • I agree with Brad that you can start marking up these kind of patterns before you’ve got visual designs.
  • I agree with Jonathon that it’s often better to have a generic wrapper element to avoid making assumptions about which elements will be used.

matthiasott/webmention: Webmention Plugin for Craft CMS

A plug-in for Craft CMS for receiving webmentions. I’ll have to tell Charlotte about this (she’s using Craft for her site).

Not The Post I Wanted To Be Writing… – Infrequently Noted

Phew! Alex seems to have calmed down. He’s responding to my concerns about exposing URLs in progressive web apps, but thankfully without the absolutist rhetoric or insults. Progress!

The Sonos Pattern Library — zdfs

There’s a lot I disagree with here. I don’t think this pattern library process is very elegant or scalable, and it certainly wouldn’t work for me.

But I’m still linking to it. Why? Because I think it’s absolutely wonderful that people share their processes like this. It doesn’t matter one whit whether or not it would work for me.

Frontend development may have gotten a lot more complicated, but the simple premise of sharing what you’ve learned hasn’t.

I couldn’t agree more!

Angola’s Wikipedia Pirates Are Exposing the Problems With Digital Colonialism | Motherboard

The street finds its own uses for colonial internet practices:

Because the data is completely free, Angolans are hiding large files in Wikipedia articles on the Portuguese Wikipedia site (Angola is a former Portuguese colony)—sometimes concealing movies in JPEG or PDF files. They’re then using a Facebook group to direct people to those files, creating a robust, completely free file sharing network.

The Secret Lives of Tumblr Teens | New Republic

A fascinating insight into some of Tumblr’s most popular accounts:

Some posts get more than a million notes—imagine a joke whispered in biology class getting a laugh from a city the size of San Francisco.

It’ll be a real shame when Tumblr disappears.

That’s “when”, not “if”. Remember:

In 2013, Yahoo bought Tumblr.

The Leica Q — Craig Mod

Set aside some time: Craig is reviewing a camera again (and you remember how epic that was last time).

Taking part in the IndieWeb

The slides from Calum’s presentation at Front-end London.

An invitation to bring back your personal site

I invite you not just to follow along here as I expand into topics beyond design and technology, but to start your own personal blog up again if you’ve been neglecting it for a while. I’m really interested in the things you are passionate about. I want to learn from you.

20 Years Ago Today

A lovely reminiscence from Matt on how he came to fall in love with the World Wide Web.

I really hope he posts this on his own site—it’ll be a shame when this disappears along with everything else being posted to Medium.

Write What You Know (Now) · An A List Apart Column

Well, this is rather lovely!

I nodded along with host Jen Simmons and guest Jeremy Keith saying some very smart things about the web and its roots as the El train cut across Philadelphia. But at the 48-minute mark things got weird, because Jen and Jeremy basically started writing my column for me while I listened.

Read on for some great advice on conquering your inner critic.

Whatfettle ⁓ Note to self: write more

You read a lot and like the idea of writing. You know the best way to get better at writing is to write, so write!

The Ethos of the Web | degrading disgracefully

This is a wonderful, wonderful description of what it feels like to publish on your own site.

When my writing is on my own server, it will always be there. I may forget about it for a while, but eventually I’ll run into it again. I can torch those posts or save them, rewrite them or repost them. But they’re mine to rediscover.

The anatomy of responsive images - JakeArchibald.com

This is the best moment to write a blog post:

I just had my responsive images epiphany and I’m writing it all down before I forget everything.

Writing something down (and sharing it) while you’re still figuring it out is, in my opinion, more valuable than waiting until you’ve understood something completely—you’ll never quite regain that perspective on what it’s like to have beginner’s mind.

The Slow Web | words from Cole Henley, @cole007

We become obsessed with tools and methods, very rarely looking at how these relate to the fundamental basics of web standards, accessibility and progressive enhancement. We obsess about a right way to do things as if there was one right way rather than looking at the goal; how things fit into the broader philosophy of what we do on the web and how what we write contributes to us being better at what we do.