Tags: systems

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Resources about Front-end Architecture and Design Systems, etc. | Lara Schenck

A great selection of links about design systems, collected and categorised.

When your design system fails — HeyDesigner

You could create components that strike the perfect balance between reuse and context sensitivity. But defining the components of your design system is just the first step. It has to make its way into the product. If it doesn’t, a design system is like a language with no extant literature or seminal texts.

Marissa Christy outlines the reasons why your design system might struggle:

  1. The redesign isn’t prioritized
  2. The tech stack is changing
  3. Maintenance takes discipline

But she also offers advice for counteracting these forces:

  1. Get buy-in from the whole team
  2. Prioritize a lightweight re-skin on older parts of the product
  3. Treat a design system like any other product project: start small
  4. Don’t wait for others. Lead by example.
  5. Finally, don’t compare yourself to others on the internet

Workplace topology | Clearleft

The hits keep on comin’ from Clearleft. This time, it’s Danielle with an absolutely brilliant and thoughtful piece on the perils of gaps and overlaps in pattern libraries, design systems and organisations.

This is such a revealing lens to view these things through! Once you’re introduced to it, it’s hard to “un-see” problems in terms of gaps and overlaps in categorisation. And even once the problems are visible, you still need to solve them in the right way:

Recognising the gaps and overlaps is only half the battle. If we apply tools to a people problem, we will only end up moving the problem somewhere else.

Some issues can be solved with better tools or better processes. In most of our workplaces, we tend to reach for tools and processes by default, because they feel easier to implement. But as often as not, it’s not a technology problem. It’s a people problem. And the solution actually involves communication skills, or effective dialogue.

That last part dovetails nicely with Jerlyn’s equally great piece.

Designing design systems | Clearleft

I know I’m biased because I work with Jerlyn, but I think this in-depth piece by her is really something! She suveys the design system landscape and proposes some lo-fi governance ideas based around good old-fashioned dialogue.

Developing a design system takes collaboration between the makers of the design systems and the different users of the system. It’s a continual process that doesn’t have to require a huge investment in new departments or massive restructuring.

It can start small.

Magic Paintbox – Illuminated – Medium

What we get from the pattern library is time and freedom to be creative. I’ve seen people claim pattern libraries are the death of creativity and innovation in design. For us, it’s the opposite of that.

Accessibility is not a feature. — Ethan Marcotte

Just last week I came across an example of what Ethan describes here: accessibility (in a pattern library) left to automatic checks rather than human experience.

Mozilla Protocol - Protocol Design System

Mozilla’s work-in-progress style guide and pattern library.

Weft. — Ethan Marcotte

I think we often focus on designing or building an element, without researching the other elements it should connect to—without understanding the system it lives in.

Badging API Explainer

Here’s an intriguing proposal that would allow web apps to indicate activity in an icon (like an unread count) in the same way that native apps can.

This is an interesting one because, in this case, it’s not just browsers that would have to implement it, but operating systems as well.

Thinking in Triplicate – Mule Design Studio – Medium

Erika has written a great guest post on Ev’s blog. It covers the meaning, the impact, and the responsibility of design …and how we’ve been chasing the wrong measurements of success.

We design for the experience of a single user at a time and expect that the collective experience, and the collective impact, will take care of itself.

Tools In The Basement | Brad Frost

It’s possible to create components in a vacuum, but ultimately you have no idea whether or not those components can successfully address your user and business needs. I’ve witnessed firsthand several design system initiatives crash and burn due to components created in isolation.

Pattern Library First: An Approach For Managing CSS — Smashing Magazine

Rachel goes into detail on how she uses pattern libraries—built with Fractal to build interfaces. I know it sounds like we paid her to say all the nice things about Fractal, but honestly, we didn’t even know she was writing this article!

After discovering Fractal two years ago, we have moved every new project — large and small — into Fractal.

Introducing the GOV.UK Design System - Government Digital Service

The Gov.uk design system is looking very, very good indeed—nicely organised with plenty of usage guidelines for every component.

Guidance on using components and patterns now follow a simple, consistent format based on task-based research into what users need in order to follow and trust an approach.

The three lessons that changed how I think about design systems

  1. Know where you stand before starting the journey
  2. Make sure everyone is speaking the same language
  3. Integrate the right tools into your team’s workflow

DesignOps Handbook - DesignBetter.Co

This looks like a really good (and free!) online book all about design ops.

(Alas, it is, once again, driven by janky JavaScript that makes it a bit of a chore to scroll and read.)

“Distinct Design Systems,” an article by Dan Mall

Dan asks:

Do we have too many design systems?

Spoiler: the answer is “no”. There. Saved you a click.

(Not really; you should definitely click.)

5 ways having a shared design system has helped us ship our designs faster – Product at Canva

The steps that the Canva team took to turbocharge their design ops.

I’ll talk about why creating a shared design system has boosted our organizational productivity—and how you can help your teams improve product quality while reducing your company’s ‘design debt’.

No, design systems will not replace design jobs — DesignSystems.com

No longer focused on recreating the wheel (or icon), designers can turn their attention to different types of challenges.

Design systems and technological disruption – The Man in Blue

Almost every technological innovation over the last 300 years has had side effects which actually increase the number of opportunities for employment. The general trend is that the easier something is to do, the more demand there is for it.

Cameron looks at the historical effects of automation and applies that to design systems. The future he sees is one of increased design democratisation and participation.

This is actually something that designers have been championing for decades – inclusive design at all levels of the company, and an increase in design thinking at all stages of product development. Now that we finally have a chance of achieving that it’s not a time to be scared. It’s a time to be celebrated.

Building and maintaining a design system | susan jean robertson

Susan writes about the challenges when trying to get widespread adoption of a design system. Spoiler: the challenges aren’t technical.

Change is hard. Communication and collaboration are absolutely necessary to make a system work. And the more people you can get involved from various disciplines the better chance you have of maintaining your system.