Tags: tutorial

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CSS Grid PlayGround | Mozilla

A ten-part tutorial on CSS Grid from Mozilla.

cassidoo/HTML-CSS-Tutorial: Tutorial for HTML and CSS

Here’s a great free curriculum for teaching HTML and CSS.

Starting a React-Powered Comment Form | CSS-Tricks

This is a really great screencast on getting started with React. I think it works well for a few reasons:

  • Sarah and Chris aren’t necessarily experts yet in React—that’s good; it means they know from experience what “gotchas” people will encounter.
  • They use a practical use-case (a comment form) that’s suited to the technology.
  • By doing it all in CodePen, they avoid the disheartening slog of installation and build tools—compare it to this introduction to React.
  • They make mistakes. There’s so much to be learned from people sharing “Oh, I thought it would work like that, but it actually works like this.”

There’s a little bit of “here’s one I prepared earlier” but, on the whole, it’s a great step-by-step approach, and one I’ll be returning to if and when I dip my toes into React.

Progressive Web Apps - ILT  |  Web  |  Google Developers

A step-by-step guide to building progressive web apps. It covers promises, service workers, fetch, and cache, but seeing as it’s from Google, it also pushes the app-shell model.

This is a handy resource but I strongly disagree with some of the advice in the section on architectures (the same bit that gets all swoonsome for app shells):

Start by forgetting everything you know about conventional web design, and instead imagine designing a native app.

Avoid overly “web-like” design.

What a horribly limiting vision for the web! After all that talk about being progressive and responsive, we’re told to pretend we’re imitating native apps on one device type.

What’s really disgusting is the way that the Chrome team are withholding the “add to home screen” prompt from anyone who dares to make progressive web apps that are actually, y’know …webby.

terminal & command line video training

An online training course that will banish all fear of the command line, expertly delivered by the one and only Remy Sharp.

For designers, new developers, UX, UI, product owners and anyone who’s been asked to “just open the terminal”.

Take advantage of the special launch price—there are some serious price reductions there.

153 ☞ A Crash Course in React

This is a nice understandable explanation of the basics of React.

There’s a real skill in explaining something so clearly that even n00bs like me can understand it.

CSS Beating Heart Tutorial. – Cassie Codes

A sweet CSS tutorial that Cassie put together for the Valentine’s Day Codebar.

Interneting Is Hard | Web Development Tutorials For Complete Beginners

A nice straightforward introduction to web development for anyone starting from scratch.

React Isomorphic Demo

It is possible to use React without relying completely on client-side JavaScript to render all your content—though it’s certainly not the default way most tutorials teach React. This ongoing tutorial aims to redress that imbalance.

Besides the main benefit of server rendering giving faster page loads, it also enables large amounts of the site to run without JavaScript. There are many reasons why you would want this, but my personal reasons are that it allows you to completely drop support JavaScript in older browsers, but still have the site function.

Web Design in 4 minutes

This is a wonderful way of progressively explaining the layered approach to building for the web that Charlotte was teaching in her Codebar workshop.

MarkSheet: a free HTML and CSS tutorial - Free tutorial to learn HTML and CSS

This looks like a great resource for beginners looking to learn HTML and CSS.

Intro to Flexbox

The slides from Arelia’s flexbox talk.

Universal React ◆ 24 ways

I have no hands-on experience with React, but this tutorial by Jack Franklin looks like a great place to start. Before the tutorial begins he succinctly and clearly outlines the perfect architecture for building on the web today:

  • The user visits www.yoursite.com and the server executes your JavaScript to generate the HTML it needs to render the page.
  • In the background, the client-side JavaScript is executed and takes over the duty of rendering the page.
  • The next time a user clicks, rather than being sent to the server, the client-side app is in control.
  • If the user doesn’t have JavaScript enabled, each click on a link goes to the server and they get the server-rendered content again.

YES!!!

Y’know, I had a chance to chat briefly with Jack at the Edge conference in London and I congratulated him on the launch of a Go Cardless site that used exactly this technique. He told me that the decision to flip the switch and make it act as a single page app came right at the end of the project. I think that points to a crucial mindset that’s reiterated here:

Now we’ll build the React application entirely on the server, before adding the client-side JavaScript right at the end.

Harnessing Flexbox For Today’s Web Apps - Smashing Magazine

More flexbox!

This time it’s a great article by Karen Menezes filled with practical examples showing where you can use flexbox today.

flexbox in 5 minutes

A really handy interactive intro to flexbox. Playing around with the properties and immediately seeing the result is a real help.

AurelioDeRosa/HTML5-API-demos

A collection of device APIs—which, despite the title, are all JavaScript, not HTML. Each API in the list has a link to its spec, an explanatory article, a demo, and the current level of support.

How to secure your site in an afternoon - Josh Emerson

Josh walks through the process he took to enabling SSL on his site (with particular attention to securing assets on CloudFront).

How To Use Huffduffer (get audio from internet onto phone) - YouTube

Chase Reeves likes Huffduffer so much, he made a video about it.

Learn CSS layout

A handy step-by-step guide to all the ways you can use CSS for layout.

Front-end performance for web designers and front-end developers by Harry Roberts

A really good introduction to front-end performance techniques. Most of this was already on my radar, but I still picked up a handy tip or two (particularly about DNS prefetching).

At this stage it should go without saying that you should be keeping up with this kind of thing: performance is really, really, really important.