Tags: ui

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Removing the White Bars in Safari on iPhone X

You could add a bunch of proprietary CSS that Apple just pulled out of their ass.

Or you could make sure to set a background colour on your body element.

I recommend the latter. Because reasons.

Fix Twitter by Jonathan Suh

Make Twitter Great Again:

Fix Twitter is a browser extension to always show “replying to” in replies and threads along with an option to restore the old-school @-mentions.

Teaching and Brainstorming Inclusive Technical Metaphors - Features - Source: An OpenNews project

Some great ideas here about using metaphors when explaining technical topics.

I really like these four guidelines for good metaphors:

  • Complete
  • Memorable
  • Inclusive
  • Accessible

Even Racists Got the Blues – The Geeky Gaeilgeoir

The perils of self-translation.

I’m often baffled by the number of people who seem to think that you can translate from one language to another simply by pulling the words of one language from a dictionary and plugging them into the syntax of the other. It just doesn’t work that way, friends.

Read to the end for a wonderfully delicious twist in the tale.

Amadán.

UI Sounds: From Zero To Hero | Icons8 Blog

Following on from Ruth’s piece, here are some more thoughts on sound in UI from Roman Zimarev, the creator of icon sounds.

He makes a distinction between notification sounds and interaction sounds, as well as talking about sound identity in branding.

A Simple Design Flaw Makes It Astoundingly Easy To Hack Siri And Alexa

This article about a specific security flaw in voice-activated assistants raises a bigger issue:

User-friendliness is increasingly at odds with security.

This is something I’ve been thinking about for a while. “Don’t make me think” is a great mantra for user experience, but a terrible mantra for security.

Our web browsers easily and invisibly collect cookies, allowing marketers to follow us across the web. Our phones back up our photos and contacts to the cloud, tempting any focused hacker with a complete repository of our private lives. It’s as if every tacit deal we’ve made with easy-to-use technology has come with a hidden cost: our own personal vulnerability. This new voice command exploit is just the latest in a growing list of security holes caused by design, but it is, perhaps, the best example of Silicon Valley’s widespread disregard for security in the face of the new and shiny.

Write.as — Spread your ideas

This looks like a really nice writing interface. It currently exports to Medium, Tumblr, and Twitter …but it would be really nice if it could post to a micropub endpoint.

Form Validation with Web Audio | CSS-Tricks

An interesting idea from Ruth—using subtle sounds to augment inline form validation.

There aren’t any extremely established best practices for this stuff. The best we can do is make tasteful choices and do user research. Which is to say, the examples in this post are ideas, not gospel.

User Interfaces for Variable Fonts · An A List Apart Article

A good introduction to variable fonts, and an exploration of the possible interface elements we might use to choose our settings: toggles? knobs? sliders? control pads?

Integrating Animation into a Design System · An A List Apart Article

Alla looks at ways of documenting animations into a pattern library. I tell ya, her book is going to be unmissable!

What Would Augment Reality? (with images, tweets) · lukew · Storify

Luke has been asking people to imagine ways of augmenting the world. Spimes are back, baby!

10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility | Aerolab

  1. Do not depend on color
  2. Do not block zoom
  3. Rediscover the alt attribute
  4. Add subtitles and captions to your videos
  5. Semantics = accessibility
  6. Use the right mark-up
  7. Use roles when necessary
  8. On hiding elements
  9. Follow web accessibility standards
  10. Audit and review

I made a style guide for my personal web site and you should too.—zachleat.com

Here’s Zach’s style guide. But the real reason I’m linking to this is his lovely description of having a personal website that grows over time:

As my own little corner of the web unceremoniously turned ten years old this year, it’s really starting to feel more like a garden than a piece of software. I certainly enjoy tending to it. I can plant what I like and with proper care it can grow into something useful.

Patterns Day 2017: Paul Lloyd on Vimeo

Paul pulls no punches in this rousing talk from Patterns Day.

The transcript is on his site.

Malaphors | Unintentional blended idioms and phrases – It’s the cream of the cake!

Some of these really tickle my fancy bone.

That’s the icing on the iceberg

You let the horse out of the cart

What planet are you living under?

That opens a whole other kettle of fish

The cat’s out of the barn

Patience comes to those who wait

That’s right up my cup of tea

Another Lens - News Deeply x Airbnb.Design

A series of questions to ask on any design project:

  • What are my lenses?
  • Am I just confirming my assumptions, or am I challenging them?
  • What details here are unfair? Unverified? Unused?
  • Am I holding onto something that I need to let go of?
  • What’s here that I designed for me? What’s here that I designed for other people?
  • What would the world look like if my assumptions were wrong?
  • Who might disagree with what I’m designing?
  • Who might be impacted by what I’m designing?
  • What do I believe?
  • Who’s someone I’m nervous to talk to about this?
  • Is my audience open to change?
  • What am I challenging as I create this?
  • How can I reframe a mistake in a way that helps me learn?
  • How does my approach to this problem today compare to how I might have approached this one year ago?
  • If I could learn one thing to help me on this project, what would that one thing be?
  • Do I need to slow down?

Patterns Day 2017: Alice Bartlett on Vimeo

At Patterns Day, Alice shared what she has learned from shepherding the Origami project within the Financial Times.

Tooltips & Toggletips

Another great deep dive by Heydon into a single interface pattern. This time it’s the tooltip, and its cousin, the toggletip.

There’s some great accessibility advice in here.

Patterns Day 2017: Jina Anne on Vimeo

Jina invented an entirely new genre for her Patterns Day talk—autobiographical fantasy.

What I’ve learned about motor impairment

James gives—if you’ll pardon the pun— hands-on advice on making sites that consider motor impairment:

  • Don’t assume keyboard access is all you need
    • Auto complete/Autofill
    • Show me my password
  • Allow for fine motor control issues
    • Don’t autoplay videos
    • Avoid hover-only controls
    • Infinite scrolling considerations
  • Be mindful of touch
    • Avoid small hit targets
    • Provide alternate controls for touch gestures

Far from being a niche concern, visitors with some form of motor impairment likely make up a significant percentage of your users. I would encourage you to test your website or application with your less dominant hand. Is it still easy to use?