Tags: war

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Yoda Cakes Gone Wrong

Disappointed in your cakes I am.

Hacked On Classics - The Old Market

Seb is going to be closing out the Brighton Digital Festival with a bang.

Seb unravels all the geeky details about how your favourite retro gadgets work, including Nintendo light guns, Casio keyboards and the cathode ray tube televisions that once dominated our living rooms.

It’s going to be like Seb: The Musical …with lasers.

Physical Web Beacons - Snook.ca

Jonathan takes a look at the physical web. Like me, he’s excited by the possibilities. Although he says:

Sadly, my mind quickly devolved into the annoyance of numerous notifications, like popup windows and other distracting adverts, vying for my attention.

This is a common worry with the physical web, but it’s unfounded. All a beacon does is broadcast a URL. You have to actively look for the URLs being broadcast—they can’t send notifications.

It all just feels like QR codes. They’ll be all over the place and most of them won’t be very useful.

I understand this concern, but whereas QR codes are completely opaque to humans, at least URLs can—and should—be human-readable …so, unlike QR codes, a URL can give you some idea of what awaits.

Why The Longplay Face | Collection

I giggled at quite of few of these mashups.

The Forgotten Kaleidoscope Craze in Victorian England | Atlas Obscura

A wonderful investigation of a culture-shifting mobile device: the kaleidoscope. A classic Gibsonian example of the street finding its own uses for technology, this story comes complete with moral panics about the effects of augmenting reality with handheld devices.

(I’m assuming the title wasn’t written by the author—this piece deals almost exclusively with pre-Victorian England.)

The Woman Who Put Men On The Moon [Comic]

Margaret Hamilton:

Never let fear get in the way! Don’t be afraid to continue even when things appear to be impossible, even when the so-called “experts” say it is impossible. Don’t be afraid to stand alone, to be different, to be wrong, to make and admit mistakes, for only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.

Exploring the Physical Web (Without Buying Beacons) — Medium

Well, this is interesting! It turns out you can turn your laptop into a beacon for broadcasting a URL to devices that support The Physical Web.

Everything is a Remix: The Force Awakens on Vimeo

The newest Kirby Ferguson video looks at remixing through the lens of the newest Star Wars film.

How Literature Became Word Perfect | New Republic

An engaging look at the history of word processing, word processed by Josephine Livingstone.

Explore New Horizons - StarBnB

Discover exotic places with local hosts in a galaxy far, far away.

Min | A smarter, faster web browser

I lightweight little web browser. It’s quite nice.

A Complete History of the Millennium Falcon — Kitbashed

Everything you never knew you wanted to know about the Millennium Falcon, wrapped up in one unsurprisingly insanely detailed essay from Michael.

Keeping a smart home guest-friendly — Sensors and sensibility

In web development, we have this concept of progressive enhancement, which means that you start by building websites with the very most basic blocks - HTML elements. Then you enhance those basic elements with CSS to make them look better, then you add JavaScript to make them whizzy - the benefit being that if the JS or the CSS fail to load, you’ve still go the basic usable blocks underneath. I’m following this same principle in the house.

Related: this great chat between Jen Simmons and Stephanie Rieger.

Glittering Blue

Earth as seen on one day in 2015 from Himawari-8. Beautiful.

The Heroine’s Journey. - WordRidden

I think I’ve shown great restraint in not linking to loads of think-pieces about Star Wars and The Force Awakens, because believe me, I’ve been reading—and listening to—a lot.

What Jessica has written here is about The Force Awakens. But more than that, it’s about Star Wars. But more than that, it’s about childhood. But more than that…

What I’m saying is: if you only read one thing about the new Star Wars film, read this.

briangonzalez/fontprep

The missing font generator for Mac OS X.

Very handy for subsetting fonts for the web. It doesn’t (yet) export WOFF2 unfortunately.

The Okinawa missiles of October | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Pssst! Wanna read something scary for Halloween? Well, this should make you shit your pants.

Seriously though, if the event described here turn out to be true, it is one of the most frightening moments in the history of our species.

Her Code Got Humans on the Moon—And Invented Software Itself | WIRED

A profile—published on Ada Lovelace Day—of Margaret Hamilton’s work on the Apollo project.

The Internet of Things Won’t Work Because Things Don’t Work « The Royal Frontier

But we are promised and shown a world where technology is gorgeous and streamlined and helpful and light and unobtrusive. We don’t live in that world. That world is a fantasy. The hope that the Internet of Things will allow us to be free from daily headaches and logistical errors is naive.

The CompuServe of Things

We need the Internet of Things to be the next step in the series that began with the general purpose PC and continued with the Internet and general purpose protocols—systems that support personal autonomy and choice. The coming Internet of Things envisions computing devices that will intermediate every aspect of our lives. I strongly believe that this will only provide the envisioned benefits or even be tolerable if we build an Internet of Things rather than a CompuServe of Things.

Locus Online Perspectives » Cory Doctorow: What If People Were Sensors, Not Things to be Sensed?

Imagine a location service that sold itself on the fact that your personal information was securely contained in its environs, used by you and you alone. You could have devices on your person that used their sensors to know things about you – when you last ate, what your dining preferences are, what your blood-sugar is, and so on, but these devices would have no truck with the cloud, and they would not deliver that information to anyone else for analysis.

Occasional blog of Tobias Revell: Haunted Machines an Origin Story (Long)

Any sufficiently advanced hacking is indistinguishable from a haunting. In the same way that many Internet of Things objects are referred to as ‘enchanting’ or ‘magical,’ with an intervention, they can very quickly become haunted.

They Write the Right Stuff

This article first appeared in Fast Company almost twenty years ago. It’s a fascinating look into the culture and process that created and maintained the software for the space shuttle. It’s the opposite of Silicon Valley’s “move fast and break things.”

To be this good, the on-board shuttle group has to be very different — the antithesis of the up-all-night, pizza-and-roller-hockey software coders who have captured the public imagination. To be this good, the on-board shuttle group has to be very ordinary — indistinguishable from any focused, disciplined, and methodically managed creative enterprise.

[this is aaronland] did I mention it vibrates?

history is time breaking up with itself

A great piece of hypertext from Aaron on the purpose of museums, the Copper Hewitt Pen, and matter battles.

The Smithsonian’s design museum just got some high-tech upgrades

A profile of the great work Aaron and Seb have been doing at the Cooper Hewitt museum. Have a read of this and then have a listen again to Aaron’s dConstruct talk.

SpringForward - A celebration of women in digital and technology - March 2015, Brighton

There’s a whole bunch of great events happening in Brighton this March: Codebar, Curiosity Hub, She Codes Brighton, 300 Seconds, She Says Brighton, and Ladies that UX. Lots of these will be downstairs from Clearleft in Middle Street—very handy!

MakerLab HQ - Maker Club

Good news, Brighton! There’s a Maker Club opening up on London Road (above the new Presuming Ed coffee shop). Grab your robot kits and come along.

ST4I - Stuff That Talks To The Internet - workshop on Vimeo

Seb will be running this workshop again at the start of February—details here. I can’t recommend it highly enough—it’s so, so good!

RFID podcast radio-in-a-box (needs sound to make any sense) | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

This is so nifty! A combination of the Radiodan, Huffduffer, and RFID, all wrapped up in a box.

Backstory here.

RFID podcast radio-in-a-box (needs sound to make any sense)

Asteroid Day

This is an awareness project I can get behind: a Clarke-like Project Spaceguard to protect the Earth from asteroid collisions. This campaign will focus awareness of this issue on one single day…

Now if only the front page of this website actually said when that day will be.

Update: And now it does.

As we may understand: A constructionist approach to ‘behaviour change’ and the Internet of Things by Dan Lockton

An epic braindump by Dan, covering connected devices, product design, co-creation, DIY, and knopening stuff up. That’s right: knopening.

Knopen, a fairly obvious portmanteau of know and open, can be a verb (to knopen something) or an adjective (e.g. a knopen tool).

JS Parse and Execution Time - TimKadlec.com

Tim’s been running the numbers on how long it takes various browsers on various devices to parse JavaScript—in this case, jQuery. The time varies enormously depending on the device hardware.

Physical Web by google

This is what Scott Jenson has been working on—a first stab at just-in-time interactions by having physical devices broadcasting URLs.

Walk up and use anything

The Tink Tank » Understanding screen reader interaction modes

Léonie gives a great, clear description of how screen readers switch modes as they traverse the DOM snapshot.

A lot can change in 6 years - Allen Pike

An astute comparison of the early years of the web with the early years of the app store. If there’s anything to this, then the most interesting native apps are yet to come. App Store 2.0?

MORNING, COMPUTER | Warren Ellis on Pacific Daylight Time

If you were in any doubt that Warren Ellis is going to blow the roof off the Brighton Dome at dConstruct, this is what happens when he decides to write a little something every day.

Panorama Fail

The image-stitching algorithm is trying its best.

Software, It’s a Thing — Medium

The first Lunar Orbiter, Andy Warhol’s Amiga, and George R.R. Martin’s WordStar …the opening address to the Digital Preservation 2014 conference July 22 in Washington, DC.

Just as early filmmakers couldn’t have predicted the level of ongoing interest in their work over a hundred years later, who can say what future generations will find important to know and preserve about the early history of software?

(Mind you, I can’t help but feel that the chances of this particular text have a long life at a Medium URL are pretty slim.)

The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz by Brian Knappenberger

The Aaron Swartz film is available on the Internet Archive under a Creative Commons attribution non-commercial share-alike license.

IXS Enterprise (IXS-110) - an album on Flickr

Design fiction from a NASA scientist.

IXS Enterprise (Work In Progress)

Peter Nixey - How to be a great software developer

I’m not sure if I agree completely with every point, but this is a great shortlist of things you can do to make your code more resilient and understandable (thereby making you, by any sensible definition, a better programmer).

New product opportunities for the Internet of Normal Things | Berg Blog

I like Matt’s observation here that the simple combination of a barebones data format like HTML delivered over HTTP is a good-enough low-level API for joining up all kinds of internet-connected things.

In the last 60 years, the biggest software platform for interop and integration – for new products, services, businesses, and value creation – has not been Android, or iOS, or Windows, or the PDP-11. The biggest and best platform has been the web.

One implication is that successful products are not necessarily those with seamless, beautiful, tightly-controlled “experiences”, but rather the ones that are capable of talking to each other.

Small things, loosely joined.

Wearables versus there-ables.

Some interesting thoughts that follow on nicely from Scott Jenson’s ideas around just-in-time interactions:

What if the technology was actually already in the room when we got there? Maybe that’s the kind of Internet-of-things that will be more sustainable and will win long-term.

Best Collaborative Project : The Net Awards 2014

Well, this is nice: the Line-mode browser hack has been nominated in the Best Collaborative Project in the Net awards.

But 24 Ways has also been nominated, and let’s face it, that really is the best collaborative project.

Curiosity Hub

This nifty place in Brighton is just down the street from me:

Our classes allow kids to get creative with exciting, cutting-edge technology and software.

Operation War Diary

A collaboration between Zooniverse and the Imperial War Museum. Now citizen scientists can become citizen historians by classifying diaries from World War One.

Photography, hello — Software ate the camera, but freed the photograph by Craig Mod

Craig recently had a piece published in the New Yorker called Goodbye, Cameras. It’s good …but this follow-on piece on his own site is truly wonderful.

Read. Absorb. Ponder.

Being close to the network does not mean being on Facebook, thought it can mean that, too. It does not mean pushing low-res images to Instagram, although there’s nothing wrong with that. What the network represents, in my mind, is a sort of ledger of humanity. The great shared mind. An image’s distance to it is the difference between contributing or not contributing to that shared ledger.

WarGames Magazine Identified By Michael Walden

Now this is what I call research:

Through the use of my knowledge of computer magazines, my sharp eyes, and other technical knowledge, I have overcome the limited amount of information available in the video content of WarGames and with complete certainty identified the exact name and issue number of the magazine read on screen by David L. Lightman in WarGames.

Spimes: A Happy Birthday Story « optional.is/required

Expanding on an exercise from last year’s Hackfarm, Brian and Mike have written a deliciously dystopian near-future short story.

Star Wars: Endor Holocaust

Realistically, what happens when you detonate a large metallic satellite (about the the size of the second Death Star) in orbit around an inhabited world (like, say, the forest moon of Endor).

It isn’t pretty.

Explorers of the combined territory.

Inspired by dConstruct, Ellen is going to start exploring the world of smart objects.

Enabling new types of web user experiences - W3C Blog

Scott gives us an excellent State Of The Web address, looking at how the web can be central to the coming age of ubiquitous computing. He rightly skips through the imitation of native apps and gets down to the potential of just-in-time interactions.

The Twittertape Machine

I would love to have a ticker-tape machine for my tweets.

Should JavaScript devs build real things?

This post is about the pros and cons of using JavaScript to programme hardware, but within it is a great summation of what makes JavaScript so powerful:

In my opinion the greatest strengths of JavaScript are its immediacy and its accessibility. It has plenty of weakness (insanely weak typing, implicit casting for comparison, terrible problems with numbers, fluid syntax, I could go on…). Regardless, these weaknesses are entirely overcome by those two points above.

Having taught quite a few people to code, the benefit of being able to open a text editor or a browser console and type code that can immediately and reliably be executed is incredible. The power this brings to the learner is unmatched. When trying to learn new things it’s important to get positive reinforcement very quickly and JavaScript has this ability in spades.

Executing console.log(“hello world”) or window.alert(2+5-20) brings immediate feedback, makes you feel as though you’re getting somewhere and that you are interacting directly with the computer as a programmer. For those of you old enough to own a Spectrum, C64 or Vic20 – BASIC (itself heavily derided) had the same benefit.

The Killing Machines by Mark Bowden in The Atlantic

How to think about drones—an in-depth and fairly balanced article by Mark Bowden on drone strikes and the politics behind them.

In the long run, careful adherence to the law matters more than eliminating another bad actor. Greater prudence and transparency are not just morally and legally essential, they are in our long-term interest, because the strikes themselves feed the anti-drone narrative, and inspire the kind of random, small-scale terror attacks that are bin Laden’s despicable legacy.

Paris Review – “One Murder Is Statistically Utterly Unimportant”: A Conversation with Warren Ellis, Molly Crabapple

Molly Crabapple interviews Warren Ellis. Fun and interesting …much like Molly Crabapple and Warren Ellis.

The creation of Missile Command and the haunting of its creator, Dave Theurer

The story behind the classic arcade game Missile Command and the toll it took on its creator:

Theurer’s constant strides for perfection left him working his body to the point that Missile Command’s premise started to manifest itself in his subconscious, sneaking into his dreams and turning them to nightmares.

There was something about the sound of those explosions, the feeling of the trackball in your hand, and the realisation that no matter how well you played, you could only delay the inevitable.

THE END

Why a New Golden Age for UI Design Is Around the Corner

A state of the connected union address, with soundbites from smart people in the world of ubicomp, internet of things, everyware, or whatever it is we’re calling it now.

Technical Machine

This looks rather exciting: Tessel is Rasperry Pi-like piece of hardware, but running JavaScript (Node.js) by default.

NSA: The Decision Problem by George Dyson

A really terrific piece by George Dyson taking a suitably long-zoom look at information warfare and the Entscheidungsproblem, tracing the lineage of PRISM from the Corona project of the Cold War.

What we have now is the crude equivalent of snatching snippets of film from the sky, in 1960, compared to the panopticon that was to come. The United States has established a coordinated system that links suspect individuals (only foreigners, of course, but that definition becomes fuzzy at times) to dangerous ideas, and, if the links and suspicions are strong enough, our drone fleet, deployed ever more widely, is authorized to execute a strike. This is only a primitive first step toward something else. Why kill possibly dangerous individuals (and the inevitable innocent bystanders) when it will soon become technically irresistible to exterminate the dangerous ideas themselves?

The proposed solution? That we abandon secrecy and conduct our information warfare in the open.

What’s Holding Up The Internet Of Things

This echoes what Scott Jenson has been saying: the current trend with connected devices is far too reliant on individual proprietary silos instead of communicating with open standards.

So instead of talking directly to one another, devices on today’s nascent Internet of Things now communicate primarily with centralized servers controlled by a related developer or vendor. That works, after a fashion, but it also leads to a bunch of balkanized subnetworks in which devices can communicate perfectly well with each other - but can’t actually talk to devices on any other balkanized subnetwork.

Silicon Valley through a PRISM · Ben Ward

Ben is rightly worried by the blasé attitude in the tech world to the PRISM revelations. Perhaps that attitude stems from a culture of “log everything by default”?

I think there’s a deep rooted trait within this industry that sedates the outrage. That is the normality, complicity, and dependency on ‘surveillance’ in the software we make.

The $12 Gongkai Phone

A fascinating analysis of a super-cheap phone from another world.

Welcome to the Galapagos of Chinese “open” source. I call it “gongkai” (公开). Gongkai is the transliteration of “open” as applied to “open source”. I feel it deserves a term of its own, as the phenomenon has grown beyond the so-called “shanzhai” (山寨) and is becoming a self-sustaining innovation ecosystem of its own.

Just as the Galapagos Islands is a unique biological ecosystem evolved in the absence of continental species, gongkai is a unique innovation ecosystem evolved with little western influence, thanks to political, language, and cultural isolation.

SpaceWarps

Zooniverse have done it again. Now you can help in the hunt for sources of gravitational lensing.

It’s informative. It’s fun. It has genuine scientific value.

A Stormy Sky of Cranky Clouds by Scott Jenson

Scott points out a really big problem with the current state of the “internet of things”: everyone is inventing their own proprietary walled-garden infrastructure instead of getting together to collaborate on standards.

The single biggest fallacy I want to blow up is this utopian idea that there is this SINGLE thing called ‘The Cloud’. Each company today reinvents their own cloud. The Cloud as a concept is dead and has been for years: we are living within a stormy sky of cranky clouds, all trying to pretend the others don’t exist.

Ghostlab

This looks like it could be a handy app for synchronising a whole bunch of devices when testing. I’ll have to give it a whirl on the device lab.

Also, it has a perfectly fair one-off price, rather than the Mafia-style protection fee model that Adobe uses for Edge Inspect.

First public use of what Became Proxima Nova by Mark Simonson

Who knew? The reissue of the classic thirteen-part Star Wars radio series was the first appearance of a proto-Proxima Nova.

There Was Once a Certain Kind of Cinema

A magnificent piece of writing from Michael, examining the influence of Sergio Leone on George Lucas.

Device lab

These device holders/stands look really nice, and they’d be a real help keeping my spaghetti cables in check.

Inside the Battle of Hoth: The Empire Strikes Out

A damning analysis of the Empire’s military strategy at the battle of Hoth, complete with illustrations. The comments are good too:

Guys, cut Palpatine some slack. He’s still in his first term as Emperor…

Execution in the Kingdom of Nouns by Steve Yegge

A classic of writing on the fundamental differences between programming languages.

Life as German POW by Carl Lehman

My friend Dan’s stepfather Carl passed away recently, aged 90. His experiences during World War II were quite something.

The changing face of computers on screen

A look at the depiction of computer hardware and peripherals in sci-fi movies over time.

Flickr, codeswarming

A beautiful timelapse visualisation of code commits to Flickr from 2004 to 2011.

Flickr, codeswarming

» Responsive Design for Apps — Part 1 Cloud Four Blog

A great piece by Jason analysing the ever-blurring lines between device classes.

Mind you, there is one question he doesn’t answer which would help clear up his framing of the situation. That question is:

What’s a web app?

Jackdaws love my big sphinx of quartz - Stuff

The biggest plot holes of World War Two.

Warning: contains spoilers.

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog

A fascinating blog documenting the secrecy around nuclear weaponry, past and present, by Alex Wellerstein of the American Institue of Physics.

On Open Platforms, Wifi, Home Automation, and Kitty Litter | John Battelle’s Search BlogJohn Battelle’s Search Blog

This echoes Scott Jenson’s call for more open standards when it comes to networked devices. We’ll need it if we want “If This, Then That” for an internet of things.

Is it the Internet of Things?

Wondering whether that network-enabled device of yours is worthy of being considered part of the “internet of things?” Just answer these few short questions.

Was the Internet just an accident? | Scott Jenson

Man, I just love Scott Jenson.

Our brains have collectively gone startup-crazy, seeing the world through stock option colored glasses, assuming that if there is no money, there is clearly no value. This is madness. I’m so desperately worried that the internet will turn out to be a happy accident.

Turning his focus on “the internet of things” he makes the very good point that what we need isn’t one company or one proprietary service; we need an ecosystem of open standards that will enable companies to build services.

We all have to appreciate how we need a deep, open solution to solve this problem. If we don’t understand, demand even, that hardware devices need to be just as discoverable an open as web servers are today, we’ll never see the internet of things come to pass.

Building a device stand

Pictures and plans for building a plywood stand for your device lab. I definitely want one of these for the Clearleft office.

The best interface is no interface | Cooper Journal

Interaction dissolving into the environment.

Dough Globe - Your little living world

My last shipment from the Quaterly contained everything I need to get a sourdough starter going (thanks to Alexis Madrigal). I think I might have to get me one of these cute sourdough globes: “It’s like a Tamagotchi, but actually alive.”

Be sure to check out the the blog documenting the design and development.

Connections

This is quite an astounding piece of writing. Robert Lucky imagines the internet of things mashed up with online social networking …but this was published in 1999!

Shadow is now Adobe Edge Inspect | Adobe Edge Inspect Team Blog

Oh, dear. Adobe Shadow gets a new name and a hefty price tag. Yesterday it was free. Today it is $119.88 per year. It’s useful but it’s not that useful.

So, lazy web, who’s working on an open-source alternative?

Warren Ellis » How To See The Future

The opening keynote from Warren Ellis for this year’s Improving Reality. I’d like to walk into space with this man.

greg.org: the making of: The Satelloons Of Project Echo: Must. Find. Satelloons.

Bomp. bomp. bomp. Satelloon of love. Bomp. bomp. bomp. Satelloon of love.

Help me raise money to buy Nikola Tesla’s old laboratory - The Oatmeal

This is so crazy, it just might work. Matt wants the internet to buy Wardenclyffe and turn it into a Tesla museum.

Digital Scarcity | Tuhin Kumar

This starts out a bit hand-wavy with analogue nostalgia, but it wraps up with some genuinely good ideas for social software.

Советские плакаты по гражданской обороне

This cold-war era soviet manual for post-nuclear life is as fascinating as it is horrifying.

A Tall Tail by Charles Stross | Tor.com

A terrific little conspiracy theory short story from Charles Stross set at last year’s (very real) 100 Year Starship gathering.

Satellite Eyes

A nifty little Mac app from Tom: it changes your desktop wallpaper to a satellite view of your current location.

Alas, it requires Lion, an operating system I’ve been trying to avoid installing.

The Farmer & Farmer Review. Modern Medicine by Jonathan Harris

This is very, very good. It gets a little unhinged towards the end but Jonathan Harris’s initial comparisons of software with medicine are spot-on.

Myself, quantified | Extenuating Circumstances

Dan writes about how data saved his life. That is not an exaggeration.

He describes how, after receiving some very bad news from his doctor, he dived into the whole “quantified self” thing with his health data. Looking back on it, he concludes:

If I were still in the startup game, I have a pretty good idea of which industry I’d want to disrupt.

Resizable Displays | Fluid Interfaces

See now, this is why liquid layouts are the way to go.

Descriptive Camera

Oh, this is just wonderful: a camera that outputs a text description instead of an image (complete with instructions on how to build one yourself). I love it!

A Furniture Manifesto | Roseology

Taking apps out of phones and embedding them in the world around us …there’s a lot of crossover with what Scott Jenson has been writing about here. Good stuff.

ImageAlpha — lossy compression for 24-bit PNG images

From Kornel, the genius who gave us ImageOptim, comes another Mac desktop tool for optimising PNGs, this time converting 24-bit PNG to 8-bit with full alpha channel.

The Star Wars Saga: Suggested Viewing Order » Absolutely No Machete Juggling

This is an intriguing suggestion: watch the Star Wars saga in the order IV, V, II, III, VI (notice that Episode I is missing entirely). The reasoning is very sound and well worth a read.

» 24 February 2012, baked by Ben Ward @ The Pastry Box Project

A beautiful reminder from Ben of the scale-free nature of the web.

We must recover our sanity where 100 million users does not represent the goal criteria of every new service. We must recover the mindset where a service used by 10,000 users, or 1,000 users, or 100 users is admired, respected, and praised for its actual success. All of those could be sustainable, profitable ventures. If TechCrunch doesn’t care to write about you, all the better.

If you are fortunate enough to work on your own product, with your own idea, and build it, and ship it, and reach enough people willing to sustain you financially for that immense amount of work, you should be applauded. You have poured in inordinate effort, and succeeded in making something that improved lives.

Camping at Kiwifoo | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

The Kiwi Foo Space Program (a weather balloon with an Android device attached) captured some beautiful images.

Camping at Kiwifoo

BLDGBLOG: Object Cancers

You think that Digital Rights Management is bad? What about Physible Rights Management?

Clear for iPhone (Coming Soon!) on Vimeo

Nik demos the neat interactions in Realmac’s latest piece of iOS software in this cute little video.

Molly - She turns your tweets into sweets.

A cute little internet-enabled sweet dispenser, powered by your retweets.

Star Wars Uncut: Director’s Cut - YouTube

The final amalgam of Star Wars Uncut is an absolute joy to behold. I enjoyed every single moment of this.

IBM Sage Computer Ad, 1960 - YouTube

A 1960 advertisement for IBM’s SAGE system …WOPR by another name.

To be ready for the worst so that the worst will never happen…

MAKE ROOM NOW

Matt is offering up his space in central Brighton every Wednesday afternoon for free-for-all Arduino tinkering. I should try to get over there.

Buxton Collection

Bill Buxton’s collection of input devices going back thirty years.

The Star Wars Holiday Special | magazine | Vanity Fair

Add this one to your Instapaper/Readability queue: the behind-the-scenes story of the train wreck that was the 1978 Star Wars Holiday Special.

3D Printing, Teleporters and Wishes - Anil Dash

Anil shares his thoughts on where there’s room for improvement in 3D printing, or as he calls it, teleporting.

Don’t Be A Free User (Pinboard Blog)

Maciej delivers a rant worthy of Paul Robert Lloyd.

Twine : Listen to your world, talk to the Internet by Supermechanical — Kickstarter

This looks truly wonderful: like a hardware version of “if this, then that.”

russell davies: again with the post digital

In a single post, Russell Davies manages to rehabilitate the term “post digital.” And he paints a vivid picture of where our “Geocities of things” is heading.

The Future of Open Fabrication

A thorough hypertext report from those good folks at the Institute For The Future on our fabrication overlords.

Innovation Starvation | World Policy Institute

A rallying cry from Neal Stephenson for Getting Big Stuff Done.

Inside the Russian Short Wave Radio Enigma | Magazine

There are echoes of “the footage” from Gibson’s Pattern Recognition in this strange tale of a cold war radio signal.

Top 10: The architecture of Star Wars (pt I) | The Critics | Architects Journal

An architectural overview of the Star Wars universe. Design fiction.

Escaping the Digital Dark Age

Stewart Brand wrote this twelve years ago: it’s more relevant than ever in today’s cloud-worshipping climate.

I’d like to think that it’s ironic that I’m linking to The Wayback Machine because the original URL for this essay is dead. But it isn’t ironic, it’s horrific.

Swarmanoid, the movie - YouTube

I, for one, welcome our autonomous swarming robot overlords.

Ian Bogost - Gamification is Bullshit

This is not as linkbaity as the title might suggest.

I’ve suggested the term “exploitationware” as a more accurate name for gamification’s true purpose…

Tiny-Ass Boba Fett « Chloe Weil

I can confirm that this crocheted mini Boba Fett is just about the cutest and simultaneously awesomest thing ever!

GitHub for Mac

This Mac desktop GUI should go some way to making designers less fearful of getting stuck in with GitHub.

Latin Text Generator for Mac OS X - LittleIpsum

A cute little lorem ipusm generator for the mac.

Calling all UK Makers to Brighton’s First Mini Maker Faire | Brighton Mini Maker Faire

Hardware hackers, you’ve got until June 30th to submit something for Maker Faire in Brighton this September (the day after dConstruct).

Cosmonaut Crashed Into Earth ‘Crying In Rage’ : Krulwich Wonders… : NPR

An astonishing story from the Soviet side of the space race that is equal parts stupidity and sacrifice.

YouTube - Vader

We want the finest Star Wars parodies known to man—we want them here and we want them now!

YouTube - Magnum v. Solo, sequence comparison

When you see Craig’s Han Solo PI side by side with the original title sequence of Magnum PI, the genius shines through.

Wired 9.03: Founding Father

Here’s a gem from the past: a thoroughly fascinating and gripping interview with Paul Baran by Stewart Brand. It’s thrilling stuff—I got goosebumps.

Everything is a Remix Part 2 on Vimeo

Part two of Kirby Ferguson’s series focuses on films. Creation requires influence.

Matter Battle! - there is a lot to say, of this we are sure

The difference between software and hardware; the digital and the instantiated.

Kod

This code editor for OS X looks interesting.

Bulkr - Download Flickr photos in batches (Mac, Windows & Linux)

This looks like it could be a handy tool for backing up Flickr photos.

Radi

A Mac app for creating animations with canvas and video.

Modifiable Futures: Science Fiction at the Bench by Colin Milburn

The influence of science on science-fiction and the influence of science-fiction on science. Or rather, how science-fiction mods science, and how science (and software) mods science-fiction.

Yet even as it has become ever more familiar and commonplace, this mash‐up of the word “science” with the word “fiction” still seems to insist on a certain internal incoherence, as if the tiny typographic space inside the label of “science fiction” were to signify a vast chasm, a void between alien worlds.

Welcome | sugru | Hack Things Better

A versatile material to help you fix things.

George Lucas Stole Chewbacca, But It’s Okay « Binary Bonsai

A fantastically detailed look by Michael at the evolution of the design of Chewbacca.

Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back Lego Chess - a set on Flickr

An Empire Strikes Back chess set made of Lego. I love it!

Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back Lego Chess

Sweet Talking Your Computer - WSJ.com

Personality in software. Pieces of technology are people too.

Journalism Warning Labels « Tom Scott

Excellent! Warning labels for bad journalism for you to print off and stick on.

GodBlock - Protect your children

A filter (for Mac and PC) to block violence, misogyny, superstition and other mainstays of religious content.

Hyperbole and a Half: Things That Can Make You Feel Like an Idiot Almost Instantly

I'm going to have to start ticking things off this list.

The real reason why Steve Jobs hates Flash - Charlie's Diary

Charles Stross peers into his dilithium crystal ball and tells tales of the future as decided by Apple.

haroon baig | projects | twitwee clock

A cute hardware hack: send a tweet with the word TwitweeClock, the hashtag #TwitweeClock, or the username @TwitweeClock, and this cuckoo clock will, well, cuckoo.

Don’t listen to Le Corbusier—or Jakob Nielsen : Cheerful

A beautiful call to arms against engineerism in design. Software cries out for love.

Tattúínárdœla saga: If Star Wars Were an Icelandic Saga « Tattúínárdœla saga

The nerdgasmic result of a collision between linguistics and Star Wars.

Twitpic - Share photos on Twitter

This thread was supposed to be about dragons!

Star Wars Weather Forecast « Tom Scott

An excellent way of visualising weather. Brighton is currently like Hoth.

Legos on Hoth - a set on Flickr

Lovely Lego Star Wars pictures.

A Pilot's Dream

QuirksBlog: Apple is not evil. iPhone developers are stupid.

PPK offers a rebuttal to Paul Graham's attack on Apple's App Store policies by placing the blame firmly at the feet of developers who refuse to embrace web technologies.

WWIII Propaganda Posters

I can't wait till those posters are available to buy.

In praise of the sci-fi corridor - Den of Geek

This is wonderful, just wonderful; an in-depth piece on corridors in science fiction movies. Swoon!

Whatcha Readin' For? - Handy TextMate tips for working with HTML & CSS

Some very handy Textmate tips from Emil ....especially the bit about doing calculations for vertical rhythm.

Biscuit Tin - Random is good.

The iPhone App of Magnetic North's wonderful serendipitous Flickr photo viewer is now available for free. It's lovely.

Make Photoshop Faster

Two little tips courtesy of Dan.

Stellarium

A free open source planetarium for your computer.

Google Quick Search Box

A Quicksilver rival from Google.

The Space Elevator Games

For those about to spacehack, we salute you. 2009-07-14, the Mojave desert.

Tom Taylor : Projects : Clarke

A sweet little Skyhook/FireEagle desktop app from Tom. It updates your FireEagle location every five minutes by pinging Skyhook's API to triangulate your position. A small piece, loosely joining two small pieces.

Tea Round - Democra-tea at work

It looks Wheel of Tea is going to face some stiff competition from this iPhone app.

Star Wars WTF

Imponderables from a galaxy far, far away...

Latest Videos from TIME.com

A great video reportage of this year's bloggies featuring a bit of a mandolin performance by yours truly.

globeandmail.com: Art of playing nice

Here's a great compromise solution for parents. Yes, your kids can play that violent video game but with one condition: they must abide by the Geneva Conventions.

StupidFilter :: Main / HomePage

Because the internet needs prophylactics for memetically transmitted diseases.

How to run Safari 4 beta and Safari 3 on the same mac: BeatnikPad Journal

Neil explains how you can have your Safari cake and eat it.

YouTube - Arcattack: Faraday Fun- Imperial March

The Imperial March played through a Faraday cage. Telsa would be proud.

Microformats in 2009 · Ben Ward

Ben shares his hopes for the coming year in microformats.

maxgadney.com

Information Graphics about WWII for WWII magazine and for the book proposal "A Visual Miscellany of World War II".

tomtaylor.co.uk : projects : microprinter

The details of Tom's hardware hack at PaperCamp: an old-school printer receipt printer hooked up via arduino.

60,000 Piece Star Wars LEGO Diorama - Film Roster

A 5' x 10' Hoth base diorama consisting of between 55,000 to 60,000 pieces of LEGO and containing 50 real lights and a remote controlled device that can deploy troops from the AT-ATs.

The OpenID and OAuth Flow: Playing with UX · Ben Ward

A thoughtful post from Ben on how the flow of OAuth, OpenID and Facebook Connect can be improved.

All Together Now!: 30GB Zunes Failing Everywhere, All At Once

Schadenfreude by software. Every singe Zune on the face of the planet froze at exactly the same moment.

Bean: An OS X Word Processor

Bean is a free word processor for OS X. Looks nice and simple.

Ztamp:s - RFID stamps that makes your objects come alive - Violet •• Let All Things Be Connected

Reading through some of the things that peope have made with these RFID tags is making me itchy to hack something tangible.

Death Star over San Francisco // Current

Handheld footage from Imperial Fleet Week in San Francisco.

Last.fm – the Blog · Last.fm for iPhone and iPod Touch

If, like me, you were going cold turkey on Mobile Scrobbler after updating your jailbroken iPhone/iPod Touch, you can stop sweating now. The official Last.fm app is really, really nice ...and it's free.

“Gorilla” Usability Testing | GarrettDimon.com

Garrett's in-depth look at Silverback, the Mac app that we've been cooking up at Clearleft.

Google Code Blog: QR Codes now available on the Google Chart API

The Google Chart API can produce QR codes. Neato!

Salon.com News | Apocalypse now

Mike Davis makes some conservative predictions about the near future.

Digital Web Magazine - Portable Social Networks, The Building Blocks Of A Social Web

Ben has written a superb article outlining the hows and whys of distributed social networks with hCard and XFN, finishing with an inspiring call to arms.

Lustro - milkcarton

A cute little Mac app that exports your address book contacts in multiple formats ...including an HTML file with hCards!

code_swarm

A tool for generating beautiful visualisations from commits to code repositories.

Storm Troopin' - a set on Flickr

The secret lives of stormtroopers.

Dinner Is Served!

vidnik - Google Code

A handy Mac app from Google that allows you to record from your iSight and upload directly to YouTube.

The Sea Forts - a set on Flickr

A collection of photographs of the otherworldly sea forts that were built in the Thames Estuary during World War Two and later used by pirate radio stations.

Red Sands

Stop using Ajax! - Opera Developer Community

Ignore the attention-grabbing headline. Brothercake is something more nuanced here (and he's backing it up with examples).

Star Wars: Collecting | Noriyoshi Ohrai: Star Wars Illustrator

Strikingly different illustrations of the Star Wars pantheon from Japan.

Camino. Releases. 1.6

Camino 1.6 is out. Get it while it's hot.

World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King

A new WOW hero class has been unveiled: the bard! "direct damage effects like "Epic Solo" that will rock foes into oblivion while powerful Indie debuffs such as "Tape Jam" and "Shoegazer" keep them in check."

ScreenReader.net: freeware freedom for blind and Visually impaired people

A free screen reader. If this turns out to be any good, it could be a game-changer: a long overdue kick in the behind for Freedom Scientific.

Plants that Twitter when they need to be watered | Geek Gestalt - A blog by Daniel Terdiman - CNET News.com

Check out this cool arduino project: input from the moisture level of a plant sends an SMS to Twitter so you know it needs to be watered.

DOTHETEST

A brilliant piece of mindhacking for a good cause. Take the test for yourself and see if you can figure out where it's all leading.

NextUpdate.com Home | Next Update

Garrett's bug tracking software is one step closer to completion.

MacHeist » Bundle

The asking price of $49 for all these apps together is a bargain. CSSEdit alone is easily worth that much.

Dean Edwards: IE7.js version 2.0 (beta)

A new version of Dean's IE7 script is available. Given my daily frustrations with IE6, I hope its marketshare declines enough that I can use this as a magic bullet in front-end development.

R2D2 Translator

Type a word, hear it from Artoo.

CollyLogic: They found my lack of faith disturbing…

Colly is being transfered from prisoner cell-block 1138.

Surfin’ Safari - Blog Archive » WebKit Does HTML5 Client-side Database Storage

I just learned from Kelly that Webkit is supporting local storage and database queries, as proposed in HTML5. Kinda like Google Gears. Potentially excited for the iPhone/iPod Touch.

The Marble of Doom

Contribute to the pool of data by inputting how much time you've wasted watching the spinning beachball of death.

Cruciforum: crucially simple

A super simple lightweight piece of forum software from Stuart in just one PHP file. Drop it in a directory and you're done.

Validator S.A.C. - Stand-Alone W3C HTML Validator Application for Mac OS X

For those times when you need to validate your markup but you don't have a 'net connection.

AssistiveWare - Videos on computer accessibility

It's easy for us to take technology for granted. This video shows how transformative technology can be. I am humbled.

TG Video: X-Wing rocket interview and in-flight disintegration

Even though it breaks up after just two seconds in the air, the moment of take-off is pretty awesome.

Orbicule | Undercover

An interesting product designed to catch the thieves after your Macbook gets stolen.

movabletype.org: Welcome to MTOS: the Movable Type Open Source Project

This is the secret I've been keeping ever since I visited Six Apart a few weeks back: Movable Type is going open source.

Neatorama » Blog Archive » Star Wars: Family Guy’s Version.

Star Wars and Family Guy: the perfect mashup. This illicit footage is pretty darn hilarious.

Medallia Blog: jQuery Reference Widget Archives

Use jQuery? Use a mac? Here's a handy dashboard reference.

Color Oracle

A very handy little app that sits in your menu bar on OS X and can instantly show you how your screen would look if you were colour blind.

R2D2 Projector :: Scene It :: RED5

This is the ultimate geek gadget: a projector in the shape of R2D2. I want one!

LIFT Conference || Adam Greenfield (LIFT07) - Google Video

Adam Greenfield encapsulates his ideas from Everyware for the audience at the LIFT conference earlier this year.

Panic - Coda - One-Window Web Development for Mac OS X

This looks like an interesting new piece of software from Panic. And the site's got some lovely JavaScript flourishes.

Twitter / Ackbar

Now Admiral Ackbar is on Twitter too. "It's a traaaap!"

Twitter / darthvader

Darth Vader signs up to Twitter. Hilarity ensues.

Flash Element TD | Novel Concepts

This Warcraft/Starcraft-style Flash game is really addictive. You have been warned.

A New Sith, or Revenge of the Hope

An interesting re-evaluation of Star Wars: Episode IV in light of information from episodes I-III. Could R2D2 and Chewbacca, as secret agents of the fledging rebellion, be the most important characters?

YouTube - Star Wars

Star Wars and Lego: two great tastes that taste great together.

YouTube - Silent Star Wars

A great re-imagining of the Star Wars trilogy as a silent movie.

Daring Fireball: 'Beta' Is Not an Excuse

"You can’t “semi-release” your 1.0 just because you want it out there but aren’t yet finished. Being semi-released is like being semi-pregnant."

YouTube - Vader Sessions

Taking samples from James Earl Jones's back catalogue and dubbing them over Star Wars sure is funny.

S5 Project

S5 has a posse.

Oddica

Sith abandon ship. I want one.

YouTube - Sam Jackson Vs. Yoda

More Sam Jackson goodness.

CcPublisher 2 - CcWiki

This is a tool for embedding licensing information in files (like MP3s). I'm going to try this out and see how it goes.

MacSaber: Turn Your Mac Into A Jedi Weapon

Use your Mac laptop's motion sensor to get lightsaber sound effects.

Cork'd

From Dan Cederholm and Dan Benjamin: a lovely looking piece of social software all about wine. I've been trying it in pre-release and it's really, really nice. This is my kind of website.

Friendster lost steam. Is MySpace just a fad?

Danah Boyd writes an essay that would've been a blog post but it got too long.

Newsvine - Comments on community

In a very meta move, I've seeded Newsvine with my post about comments (and Newsvine) with an eye to soliciting comments.

Hiding in Plain Sight: An Interview with Adam Greenfield - Boxes and Arrows

Adam Greenfield talks about his new book, Everyware: The Dawning of Ubiquitous Computing.

Camino - Mozilla power, Mac style.

Camino 1.0 is out. Come and get it.

Fairvue Central >> Bloggies >> Sixth Annual Weblog Awards

Nominations for the 2006 bloggies are open.

Oakland Tribune - Op-Ed

Send your battered old copy of 1984 to the Oakland Tribune. When they get 537 copies, they will be sent to every member of the House of Representatives and Senate.

Apple - Mac mini - Big Ideas

There's a page on the Apple website devoted to Mac mini mods, including one in a Millennium Falcon casing.

Eric's Archived Thoughts: Adium: Chatting With Style

You can skin Adium using just XHTML and CSS. Who knew?

Star Wars: Episodes I-VI - The greatest postmodern art film ever. By Aidan Wasley

What if the Force isn't a plot device... what if the Force is the plot?

Backstroke of the West

Hilariously mistranslated subtitles for a pirated copy of Revenge Of The Sith.

CoverFlow

A nifty app for OS X that allows you to browse your iTunes music by album cover.

Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith - 133t trailer

Closed captioning with a difference.