Tags: weather

7

sparkline

The Hurricane Web | Max Böck - Frontend Web Developer

When a storm comes, some of the big news sites like CNN and NPR strip down to a zippy performant text-only version that delivers the content without the bells and whistles.

I’d argue though that in some aspects, they are actually better than the original.

The numbers:

The “full” NPR site in comparison takes ~114 requests and weighs close to 3MB on average. Time to first paint is around 20 seconds on slow connections. It includes ads, analytics, tracking scripts and social media widgets.

Meanwhile, the actual news content is roughly the same.

I quite like the idea of storm-driven development.

…websites built for a storm do not rely on Javascript. The benefit simply does not outweigh the cost. They rely on resilient HTML, because that’s all that is really necessary here.

Old Weather: Whaling

A subset of one of my favourite sites on the web:

Explore the Arctic of the past from the deck of a whaling ship.

Choose your vessel and get transcribing.

Mars Weather

A handy way of quickly finding out how the weather in your area compares to the weather on Mars.

Old Weather - Our Weather's Past, the Climate's Future

What a superb project! Forget Mechanical Turk — this is the way to harness the collective intelligence of humans: transcribing weather observations made by naval ships at the beginning of the twentieth century. It's all grist for the climate model mill.

Star Wars Weather Forecast « Tom Scott

An excellent way of visualising weather. Brighton is currently like Hoth.

Liminal Existence: The Weather, by Twitter.

A nifty mashup in which Twitter bots update twice a day with weather updates. I am now friends with Brighton Weather. I feel so in touch with nature.

API - MetaWeather

I think it could be fun to mash up events (via location) with weather. This API would let me do that. How useful would it be to know what the weather would be like before coming to dConstruct, for instance?