Tags: writing

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Discovering Resilient Web Design with Jeremy Keith

In which I attempt to answer some questions raised in the reading of Resilient Web Design.

“Is This Helpful?” » Mike Industries

I like Mike’s “long zoom” view here where the glass is half full and half empty:

Several years from now, I want to be able to look back on this time the same way people look at other natural disasters. Without that terrible earthquake, we would have never improved our building codes. Without that terrible flood, we would have never built those levees. Without that terrible hurricane, we would have never rebuilt this amazing city. Without that terrible disease, we would have never developed antibodies against it.

It doesn’t require giving any credit to the disaster. The disaster will always be a complete fucking disaster. But it does involve using the disaster as an opportunity to take a hard look at what got us here and rededicate our energy towards things that will get us out.

GarrettDimon.com

It strikes me that Garrett’s site has become a valuable record of the human condition with its mix of two personal stories—one relating to his business and the other relating to his health—both of them communicated clearly through great writing.

Have a read back through the archive and I think you’ll share my admiration.

bastianallgeier/letter: Letter is a simple, highly customizable tool to create letters in your browser.

A nice little use of print (and screen) styles from Bastian—compose letters in a web browser.

Instead of messing around in Word, Pages or even Indesign, you can write your letters in the browser, export them as HTML or PDF (via Apple Preview).

Typora — a minimal markdown reading & writing app

This looks like an interesting little Markdown editor. I think I’ll take it for a spin.

Slapdashery

I really like this short-form writing project from Ben:

Daily off-the-cuff thoughts on design, UX, and products, written in 5 minutes without stopping.

He has also documented some of his strategies to make sure he sticks with it. Smart!

Front-end Style Guides by Anna Debenham

Anna has just published a lovely new version of her excellent little book on pattern libraries. EPUB, MOBI, and PDF versions are yours for a mere $8.

Radical Technologies: The Design of Everyday Life, now available for pre-order | Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird

Adam Greenfield’s new book is almost here at last, and it sounds like it has pivoted into quite an interesting beast.

SF Mistressworks | women science fiction writers

Reviews of twentieth century science fiction novels and anthologies by women writers.

Your Voice - TimKadlec.com

The most important rule to follow when giving a talk or writing is to be yourself. I can learn just about any topic out there from a million different posts or talks. The reason I’m listening to you is because I want to hear your take. I want to know what you think about it, what you’ve experienced. More than anything, I want your authenticity. I want you to be you.

Thread. — Ethan Marcotte

Ethan redesigned. It’s lovely.

And now that the new site’s live, I realize I’d like to keep working on it. I’m not just feeling excited to see where it goes from here: as modest as it is, I’ve made something I’m proud of.

The World According to Stanisław Lem - Los Angeles Review of Books

A profile of Stanisław Lem and his work, much of which is still untranslated.

A Book Apart, Working the Command Line

Remy’s excellent digital book is now available for your purchasing pleasure. I wrote a cheeky foreword for it.

SlimWiki — Beautiful Wikis for Teams

At the last Clearleft Hackfarm, one of the ideas I proposed was “a wiki that doesn’t suck.” Looks like someone’s finally done it.

kottke.org memberships

I have so much admiration for Jason Kottke’s dedication (or sheer bloodymindedness)—he’s been diligently writing and sharing weird and wonderful stuff on his own website for so long. I’m more than happy to support him in that.

Fix the internet by writing good stuff and being nice to people · Woman. Legend.Blog

Whereas before content used to be spread out on numerous domains in numerous ways, content now mostly makes its home on the three domains that are most hostile to thoughtful human discussion: Twitter, Medium, and Facebook.

So what? you may ask..

Think about how many times you’ve tweeted. Or written or commented on a Facebook post. Or started a Medium draft. These are all our words, locked in proprietary platforms that controls not only how our message is displayed, but how we write it, and even more worrying, how we think about it.

Keeper of the Clock

An unfolding series of vignettes written by Danny Hillis back in 2010. It’s all very Borgesian.

Unfathomable

A marvellous piece of writing and design. The family drama of two brothers who revolutionised the world of diving and salvage, told through beautifully typeset hypertext…

…which for some reason is rendered entirely using client-side JavaScript. Unfathomable indeed.

Redesigning Waxy, 2016 edition – Waxy.org

Andy is sticking with the indie web.

Here, I control my words. Nobody can shut this site down, run annoying ads on it, or sell it to a phone company. Nobody can tell me what I can or can’t say, and I have complete control over the way it’s displayed. Nobody except me can change the URL structure, breaking 14 years of links to content on the web.

I second that emotion.

Refreshing The Verge: no platform like home - The Verge

Mandy is fighting the good fight for the open web from within Vox Media. Her publishing tools have been built with a secret weapon…

This practice — which I refer to unoriginally as progressively enhanced storytelling — also has the added benefit of helping us make our content more accessible to more kinds of users, especially those with disabilities.