Tags: 20

1625

sparkline

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Replying to

It’s that emphasis on “between origins” that gets me (though I understand the security concerns, of course). Jake’s original proposal seemed more focused on same-origin page-level transitions …which is most single page apps today.

Replying to

Don’t get me wrong: it would be great if portals led to navigation transitions, but right now it looks like the focus is more on “like making an iframe go full page” e.g. an item in a news carousel on a search engine.

Sunday, October 18th, 2020

Checked in at Baker Street Coffee. Flat whites outdoors — with Jessica map

Checked in at Baker Street Coffee. Flat whites outdoors — with Jessica

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

Replying to

Sounds like you need more roughage in your diet. Or you could try drinking prune juice.

When it finally happens, just imagine how satisfying that blog post is going to be!

Monday, October 12th, 2020

The Web History podcast

From day one, I’ve been a fan of Jay Hoffman’s project The History Of The Web—both the newsletter and the evolving timeline.

Recently Jay started publishing essays on web history over on CSS Tricks:

  1. Birth
  2. Browsers
  3. The Website
  4. Search

Round about that time, Chris floated the idea of having people record themselves reading blog posts. I immediately volunteered my services for the web history essays.

So now you can listen to me reading Jay’s words:

  1. Birth
  2. Browsers
  3. The Website
  4. Search

Each chapter is round about half an hour long so that’s a solid two hours or so of me yapping.

Should you wish to take the audio with you wherever you go, I’ve made a podcast feed for you. Pop that in your podcatching software of choice. Here it is on Apple Podcasts. Here it is on Spotify.

And if you just can’t get enough of my voice, there’s always the Clearleft podcast …although that’s mostly other people talking, thank goodness.

Monday, October 5th, 2020

The 2020 Design Systems Survey by Sparkbox

These survey results show that creating and maintaining an impactful design system comes with challenges such as planning a clear strategy, managing changes to the system, and fostering design system adoption across the organization. Yet the long-lasting value of a mature design system—like collaboration and better communication—awaits after the hard work of overcoming these challenges is done.

Sunday, October 4th, 2020

Replying to

Of course Finland exists!… But birds, on the other hand …well, everyone knows that birds aren’t real.

https://birdsarentreal.com/

Do the research!!!

Friday, October 2nd, 2020

Playing The Kid On The Mountain (slip jig) on mandolin:

https://thesession.org/tunes/52

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mkOeQP34-U

Thursday, October 1st, 2020

Replying to

Really? A dystopian future where the survival of democracy and civilisation itself depends on maintaining the postal serv… Oh. Wait.

Thursday, September 24th, 2020

Replying to

Merci!

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020

Replying to

Yay! Different skins for the same rendering engine! Yay!

Web browsers on iOS

Safari is the only browser on iOS devices.

I don’t mean it’s the only browser that ships with iOS devices. I mean it’s the only browser that can be installed on iOS devices.

You can install something called Chrome. You can install something called Firefox. Those aren’t different web browsers. Under the hood they’re using Safari’s rendering engine. They have to. The app store doesn’t allow other browsers to be listed. The apps called Chrome and Firefox are little more than skinned versions of Safari.

If you’re a web developer, there are two possible reactions to hearing this. One is “Duh! Everyone knows that!”. The other is “What‽ I never knew that!”

If you fall into the first category, I’m guessing you’ve been a web developer for a while. The fact that Safari is the only browser on iOS devices is something you’ve known for years, and something you assume everyone else knows. It’s common knowledge, right?

But if you’re relatively new to web development—heck, if you’ve been doing web development for half a decade—you might fall into the second category. After all, why would anyone tell you that Safari is the only browser on iOS? It’s common knowledge, right?

So that’s the situation. Safari is the only browser that can run on iOS. The obvious follow-on question is: why?

Apple at this point will respond with something about safety and security, which are certainly important priorities. So let me rephrase the question: why on iOS?

Why can I install Chrome or Firefox or Edge on my Macbook running macOS? If there are safety or security reasons for preventing me from installing those browsers on my iOS device, why don’t those same concerns apply to my macOS device?

At one time, the mobile operating system—iOS—was quite different to the desktop operating system—OS X. Over time the gap has narrowed. At this point, the operating systems are converging. That makes sense. An iPhone, an iPad, and a Macbook aren’t all that different apart from the form factor. It makes sense that computing devices from the same company would share an underlying operating system.

As this convergence continues, the browser question is going to have to be decided in one direction or the other. As it is, Apple’s laptops and desktops strongly encourage you to install software from their app store, though it is still possible to install software by other means. Perhaps they’ll decide that their laptops and desktops should only be able to install software from their app store—a decision they could justify with safety and security concerns.

Imagine that situation. You buy a computer. It comes with one web browser pre-installed. You can’t install a different web browser on your computer.

You wouldn’t stand for it! I mean, Microsoft got fined for anti-competitive behaviour when they pre-bundled their web browser with Windows back in the 90s. You could still install other browsers, but just the act of pre-bundling was seen as an abuse of power. Imagine if Windows never allowed you to install Netscape Navigator?

And yet that’s exactly the situation in 2020.

You buy a computing device from Apple. It might be a Macbook. It might be an iPad. It might be an iPhone. But you can only install your choice of web browser on one of those devices. For now.

It is contradictory. It is hypocritical. It is indefensible.

Sunday, September 20th, 2020

Replying to

Thanks, Caitlyn—very kind of you!

Tuesday, September 15th, 2020

Checked in at St George's Inn. Beer in the sun 🍺 ☀️ map

Checked in at St George’s Inn. Beer in the sun 🍺 ☀️

Sunday, September 13th, 2020

Playing The Otter’s Holt (reel) by Junior Crehan on mandolin:

https://thesession.org/tunes/636

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHhKVmdEIPk

Saturday, September 12th, 2020

Checked in at Blakers Park. Tunes 🎶 — with Jessica map

Checked in at Blakers Park. Tunes 🎶 — with Jessica

Wednesday, September 9th, 2020

Picture 1 Picture 2 Picture 3 Picture 4

Flint House chef’s menu.

Monday, September 7th, 2020

Checked in at Duke of York's Picturehouse. A cinema to ourselves for T E N E T — with Jessica map

Checked in at Duke of York’s Picturehouse. A cinema to ourselves for T E N E T — with Jessica

Checked in at The Eagle. Outdoor Thai food for lunch — with Jessica map

Checked in at The Eagle. Outdoor Thai food for lunch — with Jessica