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Wednesday, March 20th, 2019

Checked in at Bone Daddies. 🍜 map

Checked in at Bone Daddies. 🍜

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

Checked in at Curry Leaf Cafe map

Checked in at Curry Leaf Cafe

Saturday, March 16th, 2019

@CraigMod Your choice of tech stack made somebody very, very happy: https://twitter.com/zachleat/status/1106887526789320704?s=20

Wednesday, March 13th, 2019

What a day that was

I woke up in Geneva. The celebrations to mark the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web were set to begin early in the morning.

It must be said, March 12th 1989 is kind of an arbitrary date. Maybe the date that the first web page went online should mark the birth of the web (though the exact date might be hard to pin down). Or maybe it should be August 6th, 1991—the date that Tim Berners-Lee announced the web to the world (well, to the alt.hypertext mailing list at least). Or you could argue that it should be April 30th, 1993, the date when the technology of the web was officially put into the public domain.

In the end, March 12, 1989 is as good a date as any to mark the birth of the web. The date that Tim Berners-Lee shared his proposal. That’s when the work began.

Exactly thirty years later, myself, Martin, and Remy are registered and ready to attend the anniversay event in the very same room where the existence of the Higgs boson was announced. There’s coffee, and there are croissants, but despite the presence of Lou Montulli, there are no cookies.

Happy birthday, World Wide Web! Love, One third of the https://worldwideweb.cern.ch team at CERN.

The doors to the auditorium open and we find some seats together. The morning’s celebrations includes great panel discussions, and an interview with Tim Berners-Lee himself. In the middle of it all, they show a short film about our hack week recreating the very first web browser.

It was surreal. There we were, at CERN, in the same room as the people who made the web happen, and everyone’s watching a video of us talking about our fun project. It was very weird and very cool.

Afterwards, there was cake. And a NeXT machine—the same one we had in the room during our hack week. I feel a real attachment to that computer.

A NeXT machine from 1989 running the WorldWideWeb browser and my laptop in 2019 running https://worldwideweb.cern.ch

We chatted with lots of lovely people. I had the great pleasure of meeting Peggie Rimmer. It was her late husband, Mike Sendall, who gave Tim Berners-Lee the time (and budget) to pursue his networked hypertext project. Peggie found Mike’s copy of Tim’s proposal in a cupboard years later. This was the copy that Mike had annotated with his now-famous verdict, “vague but exciting”. Angela has those words tattooed on her arm—Peggie got a kick out of that.

Eventually, Remy and I had to say our goodbyes. We had to get to the airport to catch our flight back to London. Taxi, airport, plane, tube; we arrived at the Science Museum in time for the evening celebrations. We couldn’t have been far behind Tim Berners-Lee. He was making a 30 hour journey from Geneva to London to Lagos. We figured seeing him at two out of those three locations was plenty.

This guy again! I think I’m being followed.

By the end of the day we were knackered but happy. The day wasn’t all sunshine and roses. There was a lot of discussion about the negative sides of the web, and what could be improved. A lot of that was from Sir Tim itself. But mostly it was a time to think about just how transformative the web has been in our lives. And a time to think about the next thirty years …and the web we want.

Tuesday, March 12th, 2019

This guy again! I think I’m being followed.

This guy again!

I think I’m being followed.

When @Zeynep met NeXT.

When @Zeynep met NeXT.

A NeXT machine from 1989 running the WorldWideWeb browser and my laptop in 2019 running https://worldwideweb.cern.ch

A NeXT machine from 1989 running the WorldWideWeb browser and my laptop in 2019 running https://worldwideweb.cern.ch

Monday, March 11th, 2019

Going to Geneva. brb

Sunday, March 10th, 2019

So long, Seattle—it’s been real.

So long, Seattle—it’s been real.

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

Checked in at Bar Melusine. Surf before turf — with Jessica map

Checked in at Bar Melusine. Surf before turf — with Jessica

Friday, March 1st, 2019

There’s a very pretty bird perched on the windowsill of the @Clearleft studio. Does anyone know what it is? cc. @cpev

There’s a very pretty bird perched on the windowsill of the @Clearleft studio.

Does anyone know what it is? cc. @cpev

Thursday, February 28th, 2019

The first speakers announced for Patterns Day 2 are @Una, @Amy_Hupe, and @Yaili, with lots more exciting announcements to come.

Tickets are available now for £175+VAT: https://ti.to/clearleft/patterns-day-2

Tarry ye not!

https://patternsday.com/

Wednesday, February 20th, 2019

Today’s oyster (from Carlingford).

Today’s oyster (from Carlingford).

Friday, February 15th, 2019

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It was great to see Jean-François again after a gap of a mere twelve years.

Exhausted but happy after an intense but thoroughly enjoyable week at @CERN hacking with @Rem, @MarkBoulton, @JohnAllsopp, @ObiWanKimberley, @CraigMod, @Chiteri, @Gericci, and @BrianSuda.

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Demo time with @rem.

Hey @ArielWaldman, we’ve got four @ScienceHackDay organisers in one place here at CERN!

Hey @ArielWaldman, we’ve got four @ScienceHackDay organisers in one place here at CERN!

Wednesday, February 13th, 2019

Checked in at CERN Restaurant 1. with brian, Remy, Craig map

Checked in at CERN Restaurant 1. with brian, Remy, Craig

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019

Back at CERN

We got the band back together.

In September of 2013, I had the great pleasure and privilege of going to CERN with a bunch of very smart people. I’m not sure how I managed to slip by. We were there to recreate the experience of using the line-mode browser. As I wrote at the time:

Just to be clear, the line-mode browser wasn’t the world’s first web browser. That honour goes to Tim Berners-Lee’s WorldWideWeb programme. But whereas WorldWideWeb only ran on NeXT machines, the line-mode browser worked cross-platform and was, therefore, instrumental in demonstrating the power of the web as a universally-accessible medium.

In the run-up to the 30th anniversary of the original (vague but exciting) proposal for what would become the World Wide Web, we’ve been invited back to try to recreate the experience of using that first web browser, the one that one ever ran on NeXT machines.

I missed the first day due to travel madness—flying back from Interaction 19 in Seattle during snowmageddon to Heathrow and then to Geneva—but by the time I arrived, my hackmates had already made a great start in identifying the objectives:

  1. Give people an understanding of the user experience of the WorldWideWeb browser.
  2. Demonstrate that a read/write philosophy was there from the beginning.
  3. Give context—what was going on at the time?

That second point is crucial. WorldWideWeb wasn’t just a web browser; it was a browser/editor. That’s by far the biggest change in terms of the original vision of the web and what we ended up getting from Mosaic onwards.

Remy is working hard on the first point. He documented the first day and now on the second day, he’s made enormous progress already.

I’m focusing on point number three. I want to show the historical context for the World Wide Web. Here’s my plan…

Seeing as we’re coming up on the thirtieth anniversary, I thought it would be interesting to take the year of the proposal (1989) and look back in a time cone of thirty years previous to that at the influences on Tim Berners-Lee. I also want to look at what has happened with the web in the thirty years since the proposal. So the date of the proposal will be a centre point, with the timespan of 1959-1989 converging on it from the past, and the timespan of 1989-2019 diverging from it into the future. I hope it could make for a nice visualisation. Maybe I could try to get it look like data from a particle collision.

We’re here till the weekend and everyone else has already made tremendous progress. Kimberly has been hacking the Gibson …well, that’s what it looked like when she was deep in the code of the NeXT machine we’ve borrowed from Musée Bolo (merci beaucoup!).

We took a little time out for a tour of the data centre. Oh, and at lunch time, we sat with Robert Cailliau and grilled him with questions about the birth of the web. Quite a day!

Now it’s time for me to hit the hay and prepare for another day of hacking in this extraordinary place.

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Perspectives on data storage.