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Sunday, August 1st, 2021

Dora!

Dora!

While the eyes of the world turn to Tokyo for the Olympics, the real nail-biting tension can be found at the Temptation Alley event at Bark In The Park. 🐕 🐶 🐩

While the eyes of the world turn to Tokyo for the Olympics, the real nail-biting tension can be found at the Temptation Alley event at Bark In The Park. 🐕 🐶 🐩

Checked in at Queen's Park. Bark In The Park! — with Jessica map

Checked in at Queen’s Park. Bark In The Park! — with Jessica

Friday, July 30th, 2021

Reader

I’ve written before about how I don’t have notifications on my phone or computer. But that doesn’t stop computer programmes waving at me, trying to attract my attention.

If I have my email client open on my computer there’s a red circle with a number in it telling me how many unread emails I have. It’s the same with Slack. If Slack is running and somebody writes something to me, or @here, or @everyone, then a red circle blinks into existence.

There’s a category of programmes like this that want my attention—email, Slack, calendars. In each case, emptiness is the desired end goal. Seeing an inbox too full of emails or a calendar too full of appointments makes me feel queasy. In theory these programmes are acting on my behalf, working for me, making my life easier. And in many ways they do. They help me keep things organised. But they also need to me to take steps: read that email, go to that appointment, catch up with that Slack message. Sometimes it can feel like the tail is wagging the dog and I’m the one doing the bidding of these pieces of software.

My RSS reader should, in theory, fall into the same category. It shows me the number of unread items, just like email or Slack. But for some reason, it feels different. When I open my RSS reader to catch up on the feeds I’m subscribed to, it doesn’t feel like opening my email client. It feels more like opening a book. And, yes, books are also things to be completed—a bookmark not only marks my current page, it also acts as a progress bar—but books are for pleasure. The pleasure might come from escapism, or stimulation, or the pursuit of knowledge. That’s a very different category to email, calendars, and Slack.

I’ve managed to wire my neurological pathways to put RSS in the books category instead of the productivity category. I’m very glad about that. I would hate if catching up on RSS feeds felt like catching up on email. Maybe that’s why I’m never entirely comfortable with newsletters—if there’s an option to subscribe by RSS instead of email, I’ll always take it.

I have two folders in my RSS reader: blogs and magazines. Reading blog posts feels like catching up with what my friends are up to (even if I don’t actually know the person). Reading magazine articles feels like spending a lazy Sunday catching up with some long-form journalism.

I should update this list of my subscriptions. It’s a bit out of date.

Matt made a nice website explaining RSS. And Nicky Case recently wrote about reviving RSS.

Oh, and if you want to have my words in your RSS reader, I have plenty of options for you.

Thursday, July 29th, 2021

Replying to

I looked into some alternatives back in 2018:

https://adactio.com/journal/13853

Checked in at Baker Street Coffee. Flat white — with Jessica, Tantek map

Checked in at Baker Street Coffee. Flat white — with Jessica, Tantek

Tuesday, July 27th, 2021

Checked in at Brunswick Square Park. Picnic — with Jessica, Tantek map

Checked in at Brunswick Square Park. Picnic — with Jessica, Tantek

Monday, July 26th, 2021

Picture 1 Picture 2 Picture 3

Horses, horses, horses.

Walking from Brighton to Lewes with @wordridden and @t.

Walking from Brighton to Lewes with @wordridden and @t.

Just heard the sad news about Steven Weinberg. I’ll never forget the mind-expanding impact his book The First Three Minutes had on me when I was growing up.

Sunday, July 25th, 2021

Checked in at Trading Post Coffee Roasters. Brunch — with Jessica, Tantek map

Checked in at Trading Post Coffee Roasters. Brunch — with Jessica, Tantek

Saturday, July 24th, 2021

Reclining under a canopy of green.

Reclining under a canopy of green.

Reading The City We Became by N. K. Jemisin.

Buy this book

Friday, July 23rd, 2021

Checked in at Burnt Orange. Digestif — with Jessica map

Checked in at Burnt Orange. Digestif — with Jessica

Checked in at Flint House. Birthday celebration — with Jessica map

Checked in at Flint House. Birthday celebration — with Jessica

Wednesday, July 21st, 2021

I can’t see the word Snowpiercer without hearing Shirley Bassey singing it to the tune of Goldfinger.

“Schnoooowpiercah! 🎶 It’s the train, the train with a class divide… And. Snow. Outside!”

Tuesday, July 20th, 2021

Hope

My last long-distance trip before we were all grounded by The Situation was to San Francisco at the end of 2019. I attended Indie Web Camp while I was there, which gave me the opportunity to add a little something to my website: an “on this day” page.

I’m glad I did. While it’s probably of little interest to anyone else, I enjoy scrolling back to see how the same date unfolded over the years.

’Sfunny, when I look back at older journal entries they’re often written out of frustration, usually when something in the dev world is bugging me. But when I look back at all the links I’ve bookmarked the vibe is much more enthusiastic, like I’m excitedly pointing at something and saying “Check this out!” I feel like sentiment analyses of those two sections of my site would yield two different results.

But when I scroll down through my “on this day” page, it also feels like descending deeper into the dark waters of linkrot. For each year back in time, the probability of a link still working decreases until there’s nothing but decay.

Sadly this is nothing new. I’ve been lamenting the state of digital preservation for years now. More recently Jonathan Zittrain penned an article in The Atlantic on the topic:

Too much has been lost already. The glue that holds humanity’s knowledge together is coming undone.

In one sense, linkrot is the price we pay for the web’s particular system of hypertext. We don’t have two-way linking, which means there’s no centralised repository of links which would be prohibitively complex to maintain. So when you want to link to something on the web, you just do it. An a element with an href attribute. That’s it. You don’t need to check with the owner of the resource you’re linking to. You don’t need to check with anyone. You have complete freedom to link to any URL you want to.

But it’s that same simple system that makes the act of linking a gamble. If the URL you’ve linked to goes away, you’ll have no way of knowing.

As I scroll down my “on this day” page, I come across more and more dead links that have been snapped off from the fabric of the web.

If I stop and think about it, it can get quite dispiriting. Why bother making hyperlinks at all? It’s only a matter of time until those links break.

And yet I still keep linking. I still keep pointing to things and saying “Check this out!” even though I know that over a long enough timescale, there’s little chance that the link will hold.

In a sense, every hyperlink on the World Wide Web is little act of hope. Even though I know that when I link to something, it probably won’t last, I still harbour that hope.

If hyperlinks are built on hope, and the web is made of hyperlinks, then in a way, the World Wide Web is quite literally made out of hope.

I like that.

Replying to

Monday, July 19th, 2021

Picture 1 Picture 2

Sharing some dappled shade on the deck with not-my-cat.

Eating jumbleberry jam on toast.