Tags: IM

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sparkline

Sunday, May 2nd, 2021

Checked in at Queen's Park. Spring is springing — with Jessica map

Checked in at Queen’s Park. Spring is springing — with Jessica

Friday, April 30th, 2021

Checked in at Bison Beach Bar. Beer on the beach — with Jessica map

Checked in at Bison Beach Bar. Beer on the beach — with Jessica

Wednesday, April 28th, 2021

Earth Restored — Toby Ord

Beautifully restored high-resolution photographs of the Earth taken by Apollo astronauts.

Saturday, April 24th, 2021

Reading in the park while @wordridden gets her first jab.

Reading in the park while @wordridden gets her first jab.

Taco time! 🌮🌮🌮

Taco time! 🌮🌮🌮

Still Hoping for Better Native Page Transitions | CSS-Tricks

It would be nice to be able to animate the transition between pages if we want to on the web without resorting to hacks or full-blown architecture choices to achieve it.

Amen, Chris, amen!

The danger here is that you might pick a single-page app just for this ability, which is what I mean by having to buy into a site architecture just to achieve this.

CSS Font Lorem Ipsum

Professional web designer on a closed course. Do not attempt.

Friday, April 23rd, 2021

Mirror project.

Mirror project.

A beer and a book apart.

A beer and a book apart.

Having a drink on the beach with @wordridden. 🍹

Having a drink on the beach with @wordridden. 🍹

Wednesday, April 21st, 2021

Replying to

Same hat!

Same hat!

Tuesday, April 20th, 2021

In a beer garden. With beer (and a book). 🍺 📖

In a beer garden. With beer (and a book). 🍺 📖

Saturday, April 17th, 2021

Checked in at Queen's Park. with Jessica map

Checked in at Queen’s Park. with Jessica

Thursday, April 15th, 2021

Brighton skies.

Brighton skies.

Monday, April 12th, 2021

Today marks the first six decades of crewed spaceflight. Here’s to many more—Поехали!

Today marks the first six decades of crewed spaceflight. Here’s to many more—Поехали!

Sunday, April 11th, 2021

Sunday brunch shakshuka.

Sunday brunch shakshuka.

Checked in at Queen's Park. Watching the dogtectives. — with Jessica map

Checked in at Queen’s Park. Watching the dogtectives. — with Jessica

Tuesday, April 6th, 2021

Swipey image grids.

This is how you write up a technique! Cassie takes an SVG pattern she used on the Clearleft “services” page and explains it in step-by-step detail, complete with explanatory animated diagrams.

Saturday, April 3rd, 2021

Principles and the English language

I work with words. Sometimes they’re my words. Sometimes they’re words that my colleagues have written:

One of my roles at Clearleft is “content buddy.” If anyone is writing a talk, or a blog post, or a proposal and they want an extra pair of eyes on it, I’m there to help.

I also work with web technologies, usually front-of-the-front-end stuff. HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. The technologies that users experience directly in web browsers.

I think a lot about design principles for the web. The two principles I keep coming back to are the robustness principle and the principle of least power.

When it comes to words, the guide that I return to again and again is George Orwell, specifically his short essay, Politics and the English Language.

Towards the end, he offers some rules for writing.

  1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
  2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
  3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
  4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
  5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
  6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

These look a lot like design principles. Not only that, but some of them look like specific design principles. Take the robustness principle:

Be conservative in what you send, be liberal in what you accept.

That first part applies to Orwell’s third rule:

If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.

Be conservative in what words you send.

Then there’s the principle of least power:

Choose the least powerful language suitable for a given purpose.

Compare that to Orwell’s second rule:

Never use a long word where a short one will do.

That could be rephrased as:

Choose the shortest word suitable for a given purpose.

Or, going in the other direction, the principle of least power could be rephrased in Orwell’s terms as:

Never use a powerful language where a simple language will do.

Oh, I like that! I like that a lot.

Guarding Against Disposable Design — Smashing Magazine

Always refreshing to see some long-term thinking applied to the web.