Tags: accessibility

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Monday, February 20th, 2017

Do we need a new heading element? We don’t know - JakeArchibald.com

Jake is absolutely spot-on here. There’s been a lot of excited talk about adding an h element to HTML but it all seems to miss the question of why the currently-specced outline algorithm hasn’t been implemented.

This is a common mistake in standards discussion — a mistake I’ve made many times before. You cannot compare the current state of things, beholden to reality, with a utopian implementation of some currently non-existent thing.

If you’re proposing something almost identical to something that failed, you better know why your proposal will succeed where the other didn’t.

Jake rightly points out that the first step isn’t to propose a whole new element; it’s to ask “Why haven’t browsers implemented the outline for sectioned headings?”

(I added a small historical note in the comments pointing to the first occurrence of this proposal way back in 1991.)

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

Accessibility and Performance | MarcySutton.com

When I heard about Universal JavaScript apps (a.k.a. isomorphic JavaScript), despite the “framework hotness”, I saw real value for accessibility and performance together. With this technique, a JavaScript app is rendered as a complete HTML payload from the server using Node.js, which is then upgraded as client resources download and execute. All of a sudden your Angular app could be usable a lot sooner, even without browser JS. Bells started going off in my head: “this could help accessible user experience, too!”

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

A new media query that will help prevent you making your users hurl.

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Most of the web really sucks if you have a slow connection

Just like many people develop with an average connection speed in mind, many people have a fixed view of who a user is. Maybe they think there are customers with a lot of money with fast connections and customers who won’t spend money on slow connections. That is, very roughly speaking, perhaps true on average, but sites don’t operate on average, they operate in particular domains.

Sunday, January 29th, 2017

Detecting text in an image on the web in real-time - Tales of a Developer Advocate by Paul Kinlan

The text detection API is still in its experimental stage, but it opens up a lot of really interesting possibilities for the web: assistive technology to read out text, archiving tools for digitising text …it’s all part of the nascent shape detection API.

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Improving accessibility in Co-op wills – Digital blogs

Some interesting insights from usability and accessibility testing at the Co-op.

We used ‘nesting’ to reduce the amount of information on the page when the user first reaches it. When the user chooses an option, we ask for any other details at that point rather than having all the questions on the page at once.

Sunday, January 15th, 2017

Using the aria-current attribute – Tink

The aria-current attribute is very handy and easy to implement. Léonie explains it really well here.

Monday, December 19th, 2016

Front-End Developers Are Information Architects Too ◆ 24 ways

Some great thoughts here from Francis on how crafting solid HTML is information architecture.

Saturday, December 10th, 2016

Accessibility Whack-A-Mole · An A List Apart Article

A fascinating piece by Eleanor on the typographic tweaking that the Wellcome team did to balance the competing needs of different users.

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

What the Heck Is Inclusive Design? ◆ 24 ways

I really, really like Heydon’s framing of inclusive design: yes, it covers accessibility, but it’s more than that, and it’s subtly different to universal design.

He also includes some tips which read like design principles to me:

  • Involve code early
  • Respect conventions
  • Don’t be exact
  • Enforce simplicity

Come to think of it, they’re really good design principles in that they are all reversible i.e. you could imagine the polar opposites being design principles elsewhere.

Monday, November 21st, 2016

FormLinter—Detect common issues that hurt conversions

A little tool for testing common form issues.

  • Did we remember to give every input a label? (No, placeholders are not an adequate replacement)?
  • Do our labels’ for attributes match our inputs’ ids?
  • Did we take advantage of the url, email, and password input types, or did we forget and just use text?
  • Are our required fields marked as such?

Monday, November 14th, 2016

Results of the 2016 GOV.UK assistive technology survey | Accessibility

The Government Digital Service have published the results of their assistive technology survey, which makes a nice companion piece to Heydon’s survey. It’s worth noting that the most common assistive technology isn’t screen readers; it’s screen magnifiers. See also this Guardian article on the prevalence of partial blindness:

Of all those registered blind or partially sighted, 93% retain some useful vision – often enough to read a book or watch a film. But this can lead to misunderstanding and confusion

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

Accessibility Meetup: role=drinks

This Saturday afternoon—the day after FFConf—there’s an accessibility meet-up in the Caxton Arms here in Brighton with lighting talks (I’m planning to give one). ‘Twould be lovely to see you there.

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

bitsofcode | Tools for Developing Accessible Websites

Ire rounds up a bunch of tools you can use to test accessibility, from dev tools to Tenon.

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

Mutating the active element - ally.js

Rodney has done some great research into how different browsers respond to a focusable element becoming inactive (by being made disabled, hidden, or removed).

Sunday, October 23rd, 2016

Simple, semantic and responsive tables (part II) – Design Today – Wouter Hillen

This uses generated content in CSS to make the aria-label attributes visible on small screens—clever!

Friday, October 21st, 2016

How the Web Became Unreadable

Kevin writes a plea on Ev’s blog for better contrast in web typography:

When you build a site and ignore what happens afterwards — when the values entered in code are translated into brightness and contrast depending on the settings of a physical screen — you’re avoiding the experience that you create. And when you design in perfect settings, with big, contrast-rich monitors, you blind yourself to users. To arbitrarily throw away contrast based on a fashion that “looks good on my perfect screen in my perfectly lit office” is abdicating designers’ responsibilities to the very people for whom they are designing.

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

Hiding inline SVG icons from screen readers | 456 Berea Street

A good reminder from Roger on how to hide images from an SVG sprite from assistive technology (use aria-hidden) and how to expose them (use title elements within the sprite).

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

Heydon asked screen readers some questions about their everyday interactions with websites. The answers quite revealing: if you’re using headings and forms correctly, you’re already making life a lot easier for them.

Wednesday, August 31st, 2016

Aria-Controls is Poop | HeydonWorks

I wrote a while back about how I switched from using a button to using a link for progressive disclosure patterns. That looks like it was a good move—if I use a button, I’d need to use aria-controls and, as Heydon outlines here, the screen reader support is pants.