Tags: adventure

22

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Tuesday, January 15th, 2019

Building links

In just over a week, I’ll be giving the opening talk at the New Adventures conference in Nottingham. I’ll be giving a workshop the day before too. There are still tickets available for both.

I have to admit, I’m kind of nervous about this talk. It’s been quite a while since the last New Adventures, but it’s always had quite the cachet. I think I went to most of them. It’s quite strange—and quite an honour—to shift gears from attendee to speaker.

The talk I’ll be giving is called Building. That might be a noun. That might be a verb. You decide:

Every new medium looks to what has come before for guidance. Web design has taken cues from centuries of typography and graphic design. Web development has borrowed metaphors and ideas from the world of architecture. Let’s take a tour of some of the most influential ideas from architecture that have crossed over into the web, from pattern languages to responsive design. Together we’ll uncover how to build resilient, performant, accessible and beautiful structures that work with the grain of the materials of the web.

This talk builds upon the talk I gave at last year’s An Event Apart called The Way Of The Web. It also reflects many of the ideas in Resilient Web Design. When I gave a run-through of the talk at Clearleft last week, Andy called it a “greatest hits.” For a while there, I was feeling guilty about retreading some ground I’ve covered in previous talks and writings. Then I realised it was pretty arrogant of me to think that anyone in the audience would be familiar with any of it.

Besides, I’ve got a whole new avenue of exploration in this talk. It’s about language and metaphor—how we talk about what we do on the web. I’ve just finished giving another run-through at the Clearleft studio and I’m feeling pretty good about it. That’s good, because I find that giving a talk in a small room to a handful of colleagues is way more stressful than giving a talk to hundreds of people at a conference.

Just as I put together links related to last year’s talk, I figured I’d provide some hyperlinks for anyone interested in the topics raised in this new talk…

Books

Articles

Audio

Thursday, January 3rd, 2019

Monday, January 22nd, 2018

Seedship

A thoroughly enjoyable adventure game in your browser. You are the AI of a colony starship. Humanity’s future is in your hands.

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

Welcome to Interactive Fiction: You’re a Wizard-Sniffing Pig - Atlas Obscura

The fascinating history of interactive fiction from adventure game to hypertext.

The split between parsers and hyperlinks reminds me of different approaches to chatbots: free text entry vs. constrained input.

Sunday, December 3rd, 2017

Friday, November 10th, 2017

Travel Oregon: The Game

Oregon Trail, updated for our times. There should be appreciably less dysentery in this game.

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

Wikipedia: The Text Adventure

You are on a website. There are exits to the north, south, east and west.

>...

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

Adventure

The Internet Archive is now hosting early Macintosh software emulated right in your browser. That means you can play Adventure: the source of subsequent text adventures, natural language parsing, and chatbots.

Colossal Cave Adventure (also known as ADVENT, Colossal Cave, or Adventure) is a text adventure game, developed originally in 1976, by Will Crowther for the PDP-10 mainframe. The game was expanded upon in 1977, with help from Don Woods, and other programmers created variations on the game and ports to other systems in the following years.

In the game, the player controls a character through simple text commands to explore a cave rumored to be filled with wealth.

Monday, April 4th, 2016

A Personal History of the Text Adventure – Read-Only Memory

Naomi Alderman:

The text adventure, like poetry, tends to attract a small band of devoted fans rather than hundreds of millions of casual players. And yet, those who care about writing know that they are where the form starts; and I can’t help feeling that videogames in general would be better if they took as much care over their words, and over their narratives, as text adventures do.

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

BBC Radio 4 Extra - The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Game - 30th Anniversary Edition

One of the most fiendish user-unfriendly (but oh-so-witty) adventure games of all time is now online for you to enjoy with some added graphical flourishes.

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

A Silent Forest

Hypertext adventure.

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

Text Adventure: Zork Creators Honored With Pioneer Award | Game|Life | Wired.com

This might well be the best thing Wired has ever published. I wish every article were in this format.

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

YOU CHOSE WRONG

Documenting all the ways you could die in a choose-your-own-adventure book.

Saturday, August 4th, 2012

Twitter conversation with ftrain

Lance Arthur uses a tweet from Paul Ford as a starting point for a text adventure.

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

The Jason Scott Adventure | Glorious Trainwrecks

Download and play the Jason Scott Adventure — only you can help Jason save the internet!

Thursday, November 12th, 2009

cyoa

An in-depth study mapping all the permutations in "choose your own adventure" books.

Monday, January 26th, 2009

Champion of Guitars.z5 - Parchment

The text adventure version of Guitar Hero.

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2008

Shackleton Centenary Expedition

Another beautiful frosty design from the Erskine chaps.

Monday, April 21st, 2008

Adventure

Andy has become the gaming world’s equivalent of uncovering the Tutankhamun’s tomb of a hard drive from Infocom containing details of the never-released sequel to The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy game. In his post, he picks out the salient points from the Lost in La Mancha-like story. In the comments, much hand-wringing ensues about what is and isn’t journalism (answer: who cares?).

I missed the Hitchhiker’s game when I was growing up. I cut my teeth on 8-bit computers; first a and then an . While I didn’t have the chance to play Douglas Adams’ meisterwerk, there were plenty of other text-only adventure games that sucked me in. I recall some quality stuff coming from the studio.

I remember learning BASIC specifically so that I could try create my own adventure games complete with mapped-out locations and a simple verb/noun parser. Adventure games seemed like the natural extension to the but far more open to exploration (even if that openness was just a cleverly-crafted illusion). Hypertext—a term used these days almost exclusively to refer to Web-based documents—seems an entirely appropriate way to describe this kind of interactive fiction.

Later this year, I and my fellow adventure game geeks will be able to wallow in nostalgia when the documentary Get Lamp is released. The film will feature interviews with some of the Infocom movers and shakers featured in Andy’s archeological treasure trove.

Friday, March 21st, 2008

Welcome | Ben Saunders | North Pole Speed Record

Intrepid adventurer Ben Saunders is off again. This time he aims to to set a new world speed record from Ward Hunt Island to the Geographic North Pole. He is armed with a beautiful website courtesy of Colly and the lads at Erskine.