Tags: atom

17

sparkline

Tuesday, May 8th, 2018

Alternative analytics

Contrary to the current consensual hallucination, there are alternatives to Google Analytics.

I haven’t tried Open Web Analytics. It looks a bit geeky, but the nice thing about it is that you can set it up to work with JavaScript or PHP (sort of like Mint, which I miss).

Also on the geeky end, there’s GoAccess which provides an interface onto your server logs. You can view the data in a browser or on the command line. I gave this a go on adactio.com and it all worked just fine.

Matomo was previously called Piwik, and it’s the closest to Google Analytics. Chris Ruppel wrote about using it as a drop-in replacement. I gave it a go on adactio.com and it did indeed collect analytics very nicely …but then I deleted it, because it still felt creepy to have any kind of analytics script at all (neither Huffduffer or The Session have any analytics tracking either).

Fathom isn’t out yet, but it looks interesting:

It will track users on a website, the key actions they are taking, and give you a non-nerdy breakdown of their journey. It’ll do so with user-centric rights and privacy, and without selling, sharing or giving away the data you collect.

I don’t think any of these alternatives offer quite the same ease-of-use that you’d get from Google Analytics. But I also don’t think that should be your highest priority. There’s a fundamental difference between doing your own analytics (self-hosted), and outsourcing the job to Google who can then track your site’s visitors across domains.

I was hoping that GDPR would put the squeeze on third-party tracking, but it looks like Google have found a way out. By declaring themselves a data controller (but not a data processor), they pass can pass the buck to the data processors to obtain consent.

If you have Google Analytics on your site, that’s you, that is.

Friday, March 30th, 2018

Sunday, November 19th, 2017

Teletype for Atom

A plug-in that lets multiple people collaborate on the same document in Atom. Could be useful for hackdays and workshops.

Tuesday, July 4th, 2017

Perch UI Pattern Library | Perch UI Pattern Library

A nice little pattern library from Rachel and Drew for the Perch admin interface. Within folders, they’re using Brad’s atomic design nomenclature, and the whole thing is managed with Fractal.

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017

JSON Feed: Home

RSS isn’t dead, but it has metamorphosed into JSON.

I don’t know if syndication feeds have yet taken on their final form, but they’re the canonical example of 927ing.

Anyway, I’ve gone ahead and added some JSON feeds to adactio.com:

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

Making And Maintaining Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2 – Smashing Magazine

A walkthrough of what’s new in Pattern Lab 2. It’s really interesting to see the convergent evolution of ideas here with what’s brewing in Fractal at Clearleft.

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

ECSS

Enduring CSS (not int the sense of “put up with” but in the sense of “long-lasting”) is a new book by Ben Frain all about writing and maintaining modular reusable CSS.

You can read the whole thing for free online or buy an eBook.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

Atomic Classification | Trent Walton

There is one truism that has been constant throughout my career on the web, and it’s this: naming things is hard.

Trent talks about the strategies out there for naming things. He makes specific mention of Atomic Design, which as Brad is always at pains to point out, is just one way of naming things: atoms, molecules, organisms, etc.

In some situations, having that pre-made vocabulary is perfect. In other situations, I’ve seen it cause all sorts of problems. It all depends on the project and the people.

Personally, I like the vocabulary to emerge from the domain knowledge of the people on the project. Building a newspaper website? Use journalism-related terms. Making a website about bicycles? Use bike-related terms.

Most importantly, make the naming process a collaborative exercise, as outlined by Alla and Charlotte.

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Atomic Design by Brad Frost

Brad’s writing a book.

Insert take-my-money.gif here.

Sunday, December 30th, 2012

Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog

A fascinating blog documenting the secrecy around nuclear weaponry, past and present, by Alex Wellerstein of the American Institue of Physics.

Friday, June 24th, 2011

An Ear for Science: The Particle Physics Windchime | SLAC News Center

The story of the particle windchime—it turns subatomic particle collisions into sound—created at Science Hack Day San Francisco.

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Capturing the Atom Bomb on Film - Audio & Photos - NYTimes.com

Monstrously beautiful images, accompanied by an eye-witness audio account.

Friday, July 24th, 2009

The Pushbutton Web: Realtime Becomes Real - Anil Dash

Anil Dash writes about the realtime web, calling it Pushbutton.

Thursday, February 12th, 2009

The Particle Zoo: Subatomic Particle Softies

Handmade subatomic particle plushies from the standard model of physics ...and beyond!

Friday, July 27th, 2007

ANN: Blogger adds hAtom microformat - Blogger Data API | Google Groups

"All new blogs, and all blogs that use Layouts and have unmodified blog page element templates now have hAtom classes in them."

Thursday, November 16th, 2006

Ma.gnolia Blog: JSON, HTML, and Microformats. Oh, My!

Magnolia is providing microformat feeds: simple HTML documents marked up with xFolk, hReview or hAtom. It's basically a simple sort of API. Very nice.

Saturday, September 16th, 2006

Brown University

Interesting use of unobtrusive JavaScript for front page navigation. Bonus points are awarded for the hAtom and hCard markup.