Tags: coding

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Monday, July 31st, 2017

Flash is in the pan

Cameron counts the ways in which Flash was like a polyfill.

Yeah, that’s right: The Man In Blue is back!

Hello codebar Sydney! | Charlotte Jackson, Front-end developer

People of Sydney, you’re in luck. Charlotte is starting up a Sydney chapter of Codebar. If you know someone there who is under-represented in the tech industry, and they’re looking to learn how to code, please tell them about this.

Some want to become full-time developers, whereas others want to learn the basics of coding to enhance their current jobs. Some want to learn programming as a hobby. Whatever the reason, we’d love to see you there!

Also, if you’re a developer in Sydney, please consider becoming a tutor at Codebar.

I promise that tutoring is not scary! We ask that you let us know which areas you feel comfortable tutoring when you sign up, so you choose what you teach. It’s absolutely okay to not know answers during sessions, but knowing how to look for them is helpful.

Oh, and if you’ve got a space in Sydney that can accommodate a class, please, please consider become a Codebar sponsor.

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

It’s Time to Make Code More Tinker-Friendly | WIRED

We don’t want the field to de-­democratize and become the province solely of those who can slog through a computer science degree.

So we need new tools that let everyone see, understand, and remix today’s web. We need, in other words, to reboot the culture of View Source.

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

whiteink — Tech lead: an introduction

A series of posts on the decisions and trade-offs involved in being a tech lead:

I think good tech leads spend a lot of their time somewhere in between the two extremes, adjusting the balance as circumstances demand.

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

Code clarity - Anthony Ricaud

Breaking down programming tasks into smaller chunks …and naming things.

I’ll take a piece of paper and write the function names I’m going to implement. Or I’ll do it directly in my code editor, with real functions or comments.

It allows you to focus on one problem at a time. When you’re writing those function names, you are thinking about what the code should be doing. When you’re implementing the functions, you are thinking about how the code should do it.

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Codebar Coach Guide

It’s a short list, but this brief guide for coaches at Codebar is packed with excellent advice for anybody getting into teaching or training:

  • Do not take over the keyboard! This can be off-putting and scary.
  • Encourage the students to type and not copy paste.
  • Assume that anyone you’re teaching has no knowledge but infinite intelligence.

Monday, May 1st, 2017

Springer Nature frontend playbook: house style guide

I like it when organisations share their in-house coding styles. This one from Springer Nature not only has guides for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, but it also has a good primer on progressive enhancement.

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

Phishing with Unicode Domains - Xudong Zheng

Domains registered with punycode names (and then given TLS certificates) are worryingly indistinguishable from their ASCII counterparts.

Can you spot the difference between the URLs https://adactio.com and https://аdаctіо.com?

Thursday, March 30th, 2017

Creating my first HTTP server in node.js | Charlotte Jackson, Front-end developer

Charlotte’s step-by-step account of setting up a Node server is going to be invaluable if and when I get around to dipping my toes in those waters.

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Modern JavaScript for Ancient Web Developers

Speaking as an ancient web developer myself, this account by Gina of her journey into Node.js is really insightful. But I can’t help but get exhausted just contemplating the yak-shaving involved in the tooling set-up:

The sheer number of tools and plugins and packages and dependencies and editor setup and build configurations required to do it “the right way” is enough to stall you before you even get started.

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

CodePen Projects Is Here! - CodePen Blog

Incredibly impressive work from the CodePen team—you can now edit entire projects in your web browser …and then deploy them to a live site!

Sunday, March 19th, 2017

Frameworks without the framework: why didn’t we think of this sooner? • Svelte

Interesting ideas around front-end frameworks:

The common view is that frameworks make it easier to manage the complexity of your code: the framework abstracts away all the fussy implementation details with techniques like virtual DOM diffing. But that’s not really true. At best, frameworks move the complexity around, away from code that you had to write and into code you didn’t.

Instead, the reason that ideas like React are so wildly and deservedly successful is that they make it easier to manage the complexity of your concepts. Frameworks are primarily a tool for structuring your thoughts, not your code.

The proposed alternative here is to transpile from the idiom of the framework into vanilla JavaScript as part of the build process, which should result in better performance and interoperability.

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

kamranahmedse/design-patterns-for-humans: Design Patterns for Humans™ - An ultra-simplified explanation

I’m crap at object-oriented programming (probably because I don’t get get enough practice), but I’ve had a quick read through this and it looks like a nice clear primer. I shall return and peruse in more depth next time I’m trying to remember how to do all this class-based stuff.

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

Base64 Encoding & Performance, Part 1: What’s Up with Base64?

Harry clearly outlines the performance problems of Base64 encoding images in stylesheets. He’s got a follow-up post with sample data.

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

100 Days Of Open Source (2017) — Joschi Kuphal · Web architect · Nuremberg / Germany

Joschi is documenting his commitment to “contribute at least one meaningful commit a day to a public Open Source project or a similar community effort.” So far it’s a really nice mix of coding and face-to-face activities.

Less Bro-gramming: Net Natives host and sponsor Codebar | Net Natives

An excellent potted history from Cassie on women in computing.

NASA’s “Keypunch girls” would work in cramped rows translating programming instructions onto paper pads, whilst the machine operators would sit in comfort, feeding the code decks through card readers and enjoying the esteem of the end result (I imagine it a bit like Mad Men, but with more sexism and astronauts).

Sunday, January 29th, 2017

Callback Hell

At first when I was reading this JavaScript coding guide, I thought “Isn’t this exactly what promises address?” but that is then addressed further down:

Before looking at more advanced solutions, remember that callbacks are a fundamental part of JavaScript (since they are just functions) and you should learn how to read and write them before moving on to more advanced language features, since they all depend on an understanding of callbacks.

Fair enough. In any case, what you’ll find here is mainly good advice for writing modular code.

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

ryanmcdermott/clean-code-javascript: Clean Code concepts adapted for JavaScript

This looks a sensible approach to writing clean JavaScript.

Friday, November 25th, 2016

Hey designers, if you only know one thing about JavaScript, this is what I would recommend | CSS-Tricks

This is a really great short explanation by Chris. I think it shows that the really power of JavaScript in the browser isn’t so much the language itself, but the DOM—the glue that ties the JavaScript to the HTML.

It reminds me of the old jQuery philosophy: find something and do stuff to it.

Monday, November 21st, 2016

You Are Not Paid to Write Code – Brave New Geek

Gall’s Fundamental Theorem of Systems is that new systems mean new problems. I think the same can safely be said of code—more code, more problems. Do it without a new system if you can

A cautionary tale of the risks involved with embracing new frameworks.

But when you introduce a new system, you introduce new variables, new failure points, and new problems.

almost anything is easier to get into than out of.