Tags: components

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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

Pattern patter. — Ethan Marcotte

Ethan has been thinking smarty-thinky thoughts about patterns and pattern libraries.

Monday, December 19th, 2016

BAgel

The styleguide, design principles, and pattern library for British Airways. It’s the “global experience language” for BA …so it’s called BAgel.

Sunday, December 4th, 2016

Fractal ways

24 Ways is back! That’s how we web nerds know that the Christmas season is here. It kicked off this year with a most excellent bit of hardware hacking from Seb: Internet of Stranger Things.

The site is looking lovely as always. There’s also a component library to to accompany it: Bits, the front-end component library for 24 ways. Nice work, courtesy of Paul. (I particularly like the comment component example).

The component library is built with Fractal, the magnificent tool that Mark has open-sourced. We’ve been using at Clearleft for a while now, but we haven’t had a chance to make any of the component libraries public so it’s really great to be able to point to the 24 Ways example. The code is all on Github too.

There’s a really good buzz around Fractal right now. Lots of people in the design systems Slack channel are talking about it. There’s also a dedicated Fractal Slack channel for people getting into the nitty-gritty of using the tool.

If you’re currently wrestling with the challenges of putting a front-end component library together, be sure to give Fractal a whirl.

Thursday, November 24th, 2016

Document your design systems with Fractal | Creative Bloq

This quick dip into Fractal was in last month’s Net magazine.

It’s very gratifying to see how much Fractal is resonating with people—Mark has put so much hard work into it.

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

Custom Elements: an ecosystem still being worked out - Tales of a Developer Advocate

Really, really smart thinking from Paul here, musing on the power relationship between the creators of custom elements and the users of custom elements.

From Pages to Patterns – Charlotte Jackson - btconfBER2016 on Vimeo

The video of Charlotte’s excellent pattern library talk that she presented yesterday in Berlin.

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

Create a MarkDown tag - JSFiddle

This is nice example of a web component that degrades gracefully—if custom elements aren’t supported, you still get the markdown content, just not converted to HTML.

<ah-markdown>
## Render some markdown!
</ah-markdown>

Sunday, October 23rd, 2016

Overview | Atlassian Design Guidelines

A nicely-documented styleguide from Atlassian. It’s not a component library, though—there’s no code here.

Friday, October 21st, 2016

The Web Platform Podcast : 111 Extensible Web Components on Huffduffer

I spoke my brains in this podcast episode, all about web components, progressive enhancement and backwards compatibility.

Maintaining and organising a pattern library - FutureLearn

Alla looks at a few different ways of organising the contents of a pattern library, based on her experience with the FutureLearn team.

Tuesday, October 11th, 2016

You Might Not Need JavaScript

Una has put together a nice collection of patterns that use CSS for interactions. JavaScript would certainly be more suitable for many of these, but they still provide some great ideas for robust fallbacks.

Monday, October 10th, 2016

Taking Pattern Libraries To The Next Level – Smashing Magazine

Here’s an epic brain dump by Vitaly on the challenges of putting together a pattern library and then maintaining it.

Sacrificing consistency for usability is fine. A slightly open-ended, inconsistent but heavily used pattern library is better than a perfectly consistent pattern library that is never used.

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

Building Resizeable Components with Relative CSS Units | CSS-Tricks

A thorough and compelling demonstration of why it makes sense to size all the properties of your components—font size, margins, borders, etc.—in ems or rems rather than mixing in pixels for some properties. It’s all about the scalability, innit?

Monday, September 12th, 2016

Style Guides, Pattern Libraries, Design Systems and other amenities. // Speaker Deck

This slide deck is a whistle-stop tour of all things styleguide and pattern-library related. Nice to see Charlotte’s excellent exercise get a shout-out.

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Shadow DOM v1: self-contained web components | Web Fundamentals - Google Developers

An in-depth look at the current Shadow DOM spec. It’s well-written but I don’t think this will really click with me until I start playing around with it for myself.

It’s good to see that the examples have some thought given to fallback content.

There’s also a corresponding tutorial on custom elements

Monday, August 8th, 2016

“Researching Design Systems,” an article by Dan Mall

Dan has been researching the history of design systems, annotating as he goes.

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

Extensible web components

Adam Onishi has written up his thoughts on web components and progressive enhancements, following on from a discussion we were having on Slack. He shares a lot of the same frustrations as I do.

Two years ago, I said:

I have conflicting feelings about Web Components. I am simultaneously very excited and very nervous.

I still feel that way. In theory, web components are very exciting. In practice, web components are very worrying. The worrying aspect comes from the treatment of backwards compatibility.

It all comes down to the way custom elements work. When you make up a custom element, it’s basically a span.

<fancy-select></fancy-select>

Then, using JavaScript with ShadowDOM, templates, and the other specs that together make up the web components ecosystem, you turn that inert span-like element into something all-singing and dancing. That’s great if the browser supports those technologies, and the JavaScript executes successfully. But if either of those conditions aren’t met, what you’re left with is basically a span.

One of the proposed ways around this was to allow custom elements to extend existing elements (not just spans). The proposed syntax for this was an is attribute.

<select is="fancy-select">...</select>

Browser makers responded to this by saying “Nah, that’s too hard.”

To be honest, I had pretty much given up on the is functionality ever seeing the light of day, but Monica has rekindled my hope:

Still, I’m not holding my breath for this kind of declarative extensibility landing in browsers any time soon. Instead, a JavaScript-based way of extending existing existing elements is currently the only way of piggybacking on all the accessible behavioural goodies you get with native elements.

class FancySelect extends HTMLSelectElement

But this imperative approach fails completely if custom elements aren’t supported, or if the JavaScript fails to execute. Now you’re back to having spans.

The presentation on web components at the Progressive Web Apps Dev Summit referred to this JavaScript-based extensibility as “progressively enhancing what’s already available”, which is a bit of a stretch, given how completely it falls apart in older browsers. It was kind of a weird talk, to be honest. After fifteen minutes of talking about creating elements entirely from scratch, there was a minute or two devoted to the is attribute and extending existing elements …before carrying as though those two minutes never happened.

But even without any means of extending existing elements, it should still be possible to define custom elements that have some kind of fallback in non-supporting browsers:

<fancy-select>
 <select>...</select>
</fancy-select>

In that situation, you at least get a regular ol’ select element in older browsers (or in modern browsers before the JavaScript kicks in and uplifts the custom element).

Adam has a great example of this in his post:

I’ve been thinking of a gallery component lately, where you’d have a custom element, say <o-gallery> for want of a better example, and simply populate it with images you want to display, with custom elements and shadow DOM you can add all the rest, controls/layout etc. Markup would be something like:

<o-gallery>
 <img src="">
 <img src="">
 <img src="">
</o-gallery>

If none of the extra stuff loads, what do we get? Well you get 3 images on the page. You still get the content, but just none of the fancy interactivity.

Yes! This, in my opinion, is how we should be approaching the design of web components. This is what gets me excited about web components.

Then I look at pretty much all the examples of web components out there and my nervousness kicks in. Hardly any of them spare a thought for backwards-compatibility. Take a look, for example, at the entire contents of the body element for the Polymer Shop demo site:

<shop-app unresolved="">SHOP</shop-app>

This seems really odd to me, because I don’t think it’s a good way to “sell” a technology.

Compare service workers to web components.

First of all, ask the question “who benefits from this technology?” In the case of service workers, it’s the end users. They get faster websites that handle network failure better. In the case of web components, there are no direct end-user benefits. Web components exist to make developers lives easier. That’s absolutely fine, but any developer convenience gained by the use of web components can’t come at the expense of the user—that price is too high.

The next question we usually ask when we’re evaluating a technology is “how well does it work?” Personally, I think it’s just as important to ask “how well does it fail?”

Service workers work well and fail well. If a browser supports service workers, the user gets all the benefits. If a browser doesn’t support service workers, the user get the same experience they would have always had.

Web components (will) work well, but fail badly. If a browser supports web components, the user gets the experience that the developer has crafted using these new technologies. If a browser doesn’t support web components, the user gets …probably nothing. It depends on how the web components have been designed.

It’s so much easier to get excited about implementing service workers. You’ve literally got nothing to lose and everything to gain. That’s not the case with web components. Or at least not with the way they are currently being sold.

See, this is why I think it’s so important to put some effort into designing web components that have some kind of fallback. Those web components will work well and fail well.

Look at the way new elements are designed for HTML. Think of complex additions like canvas, audio, video, and picture. Each one has been designed with backwards-compatibility in mind—there’s always a way to provide fallback content.

Web components give us developers the same power that, up until now, only belonged to browser makers. Web components also give us developers the same responsibilities as browser makers. We should take that responsibility seriously.

Web components are supposed to be the poster child for The Extensible Web Manifesto. I’m all for an extensible web. But the way that web components are currently being built looks more like an endorsement of The Replaceable Web Manifesto. I’m not okay with a replaceable web.

Here’s hoping that my concerns won’t be dismissed as “piffle and tosh” again by the very people who should be thinking about these issues.

Monday, August 1st, 2016

Web Components and progressive enhancement - Adam Onishi

Adam and I share the same hopes and frustrations with web components. They can be written in a resilient, layered way that allows for progressive enhancement, but just about every example out there demonstrates a “my way or the highway” approach to using them.

We were chatting about this in the Design Systems slack channel, and it helped clarify some of my thoughts. I’ll try to poop out a blog post about this soon.

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

A Code Review, Or Yet Another Reason to Love the Web | Brad Frost

I love this back and forth between Brad and Jonathon. I think they’ve both got some good ideas:

  • I agree with Brad that you can start marking up these kind of patterns before you’ve got visual designs.
  • I agree with Jonathon that it’s often better to have a generic wrapper element to avoid making assumptions about which elements will be used.