Tags: crypto

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Friday, October 25th, 2019

Latest Firefox Brings Privacy Protections Front and Center Letting You Track the Trackers - The Mozilla Blog

I really like this latest addition in Firefox to show how many tracking scripts are being blocked. I think it’s always good to make the invisible visible (one of the reasons why I like RequestMap so much).

Friday, September 6th, 2019

Enigma machine / Tom MacWright / Observable

See how an Enigma machine works …and interact with it.

Letters to be encrypted enter at the boundary, move through the wire matrix, and exit.

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019

Today’s Firefox Blocks Third-Party Tracking Cookies and Cryptomining by Default - The Mozilla Blog

If you haven’t done so already, you should really switch to Firefox.

Then encourage your friends and family to switch to Firefox too.

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

Blockchain and Trust - Schneier on Security

Honestly, cryptocurrencies are useless. They’re only used by speculators looking for quick riches, people who don’t like government-backed currencies, and criminals who want a black-market way to exchange money.

Bruce Schneier on the blockchain:

What blockchain does is shift some of the trust in people and institutions to trust in technology. You need to trust the cryptography, the protocols, the software, the computers and the network. And you need to trust them absolutely, because they’re often single points of failure.

Thursday, December 6th, 2018

Four Days Trapped at Sea With Crypto’s Nouveau Riche

A brilliantly written piece by Laurie Penny. Devestating, funny, and sad, featuring journalistic gold like this:

John McAfee has never been convicted of rape and murder, but—crucially—not in the same way that you or I have never been convicted of rape or murder.

Saturday, March 10th, 2018

Bitcoin Is Ridiculous. Blockchain Is Dangerous: Paul Ford - Bloomberg

An astoundingly great piece of writing from Paul Ford, comparing the dot-com bubble and the current blockchain bubble. This resonates so hard:

I knew I was supposed to have an opinion on how the web and the capital markets interacted, but I just wanted to write stuff and put it online. Or to talk about web standards—those documents, crafted by committees at the World Wide Web consortium, that defined the contract between a web browser and a web server, outlining how HTML would work. These standards didn’t define just software, but also culture; this was the raw material of human interaction.

And, damn, if this isn’t the best description the post-bubble web:

Heat and light returned. And bit by bit, the software industry insinuated itself into every aspect of global enterprise. Mobile happened, social networks exploded, jobs returned, and coding schools popped up to convert humans into programmers and feed them to the champing maw of commerce. The abstractions I loved became industries.

Oof! That isn’t even the final gut punch. This is:

Here’s what I finally figured out, 25 years in: What Silicon Valley loves most isn’t the products, or the platforms underneath them, but markets.

Thursday, January 25th, 2018

PonziCoin

Yet another cryptocurrency …except that this was meant to be satire.

This has gotten crazy out of hand, I apologize but we will no longer be selling PonziCoin on this site because this was a joke.

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

The Woman Who Smashed Codes - Jason Fagone - Hardcover

This book—released today—looks right up my alley.

After World War I, Smith used her talents to catch gangsters and smugglers during Prohibition, then accepted a covert mission to discover and expose Nazi spy rings that were spreading like wildfire across South America, advancing ever closer to the United States. As World War II raged, Elizebeth fought a highly classified battle of wits against Hitler’s Reich, cracking multiple versions of the Enigma machine used by German spies.

Monday, January 30th, 2017

The Invention of Wireless Cryptography—The Appendix

A marvellous story of early twentieth century espionage over the airwaves.

In one proposal, hidden instructions were interspersed within regular, ordinary-looking messages by slightly lengthening the spaces between dots and dashes.

Monday, December 26th, 2016

Enigma-E

An Enigma machine of one’s own.

Sunday, December 6th, 2015

The Moral Character of Cryptographic Work by Phillip Rogaway (PDF)

It’s a PDF and it’s an academic paper, but this rousing call to arms is a remarkably clear and engrossing read.

With few exceptions, the atomic scientists who worked on disarmament were not the same individuals as those who built the bomb. Their colleagues—fellow physicists—did that. Cryptographers didn’t turn the Internet into an instrument of total surveillance, but our colleagues—fellow computer scientists and engineers—did that.

It concludes with a series of design principles for the cryptographic community:

  • Attend to problems’ social value. Do anti-surveillance research.
  • Be introspective about why you are working on the problems you are.
  • Apply practice-oriented provable security to anti-surveillance problems.
  • Think twice, and then again, about accepting military funding.
  • Regard ordinary people as those whose needs you ultimately aim to satisfy.
  • Be open to diverse models. Regard all models as suspect and dialectical.
  • Get a systems-level view. Attend to that which surrounds our field.
  • Learn some privacy tools. Use them. Improve them.
  • Stop with the cutesy pictures. Take adversaries seriously.
  • Design and build a broadly useful cryptographic commons.
  • Choose language well. Communication is integral to having an impact.

We need to erect a much expanded commons on the Internet. We need to realize popular services in a secure, distributed, and decentralized way, powered by free software and free/open hardware. We need to build systems beyond the reach of super-sized companies and spy agencies. Such services must be based on strong cryptography. Emphasizing that prerequisite, we need to expand our cryptographic commons.

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

100 words 052

There was a Clearleft outing to Bletchley Park today. I can’t believe I hadn’t been before. It was nerdvana—crypto, history, and science combined in one very English location.

Alan Turing’s work at Station X is rightly lauded, but I can’t help feeling a bit uncomfortable with the way we make heroes of those who work in the shadows. After the war, England’s fictional hero was James Bond, the creation of former Bletchley worker Ian Fleming. And now we have GCHQ spying on its own citizens.

Righteousness in the past doesn’t earn a country a free pass for the future.

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Seeing Like a Network — The Message — Medium

How computers work:

One day, a man name Alan Turing found a magic lamp, and rubbed it. Out popped a genie, and Turing wished for infinite wishes. Then we killed him for being gay, but we still have the wishes.

Then we networked computers together:

The network is ultimately not doing a favor for those in power, even if they think they’ve mastered it for now. It increases their power a bit, it increases the power of individuals immeasurably. We just have to learn to live in the age of networks.

We are all nodes in many networks. This is a beautiful description of how one of those networks operates.

Saturday, December 28th, 2013

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Alice and Bob in Cipherspace

A clear explanation of the current state of homomorphic encryption.

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

telegraphic and signal codes : scans, transcriptions

Before there were HTTP codes, there were telegraphic codes. The Victorian internet indeed!