Tags: css

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sparkline

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

Silly hover effects and the future of web typography – Pixelambacht

These experiments with transitioning variable font styles on hover might be silly, but I can see the potential for some beautiful interaction design.

CSS usage on the web platform - Microsoft Edge Development

Top of the props.

CSS properties …props …top of the. Never mind.

This CSS usage data comes from a Bing-powered scan of 2,602,016.00 pages.

Accessible Links Re:visited | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

Great advice on keeping your hyperlinks accessible.

Friday, December 1st, 2017

Cascading Web Design with Feature Queries ◆ 24 ways

24 Ways is back! Yay! This year’s edition kicks off with a great article by Hui Jing on using @supports:

Chances are, the latest features will not ship across all browsers at the same time. But you know what? That’s perfectly fine. If we accept this as a feature of the web, instead of a bug, we’ve just opened up a lot more web design possibilities.

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

Accessible custom styled form elements - Rian Rietveld

An excellent level-headed evaluation of styling and scripting form controls, weighing up the benefits and trade-offs. The more tightly you control the appearance, the less you get to benefit from the functionality (and accessibility) that the browser gives you for free …meaning you’ve now to got to work harder to replace it.

HTML elements like check buttons, radio buttons or select options can be hard to style with CSS in a custom design. There are many workarounds for this, but are they accessible?

Tuesday, November 28th, 2017

V6: Typography and Proportions | Rob Weychert

Rob walks us through the typographic choices for his recent redesign:

Most of what I design that incorporates type has a typographic scale as its foundation, which informs the typeface choices and layout proportions. The process of creating that scale begins by asking what the type needs to do, and what role contrasting sizes will play in that.

Eric’s Archived Thoughts: Generating Wireframe Boxes with CSS and HTML5

Eric uses some super-clever CSS to “wireframe up” a web page.

I wonder if this could be turned into a little bookmarklet?

Thursday, November 23rd, 2017

Localisation and Translation on the Web

Practical advice from Ire on localising web pages.

A Content Slider

Brad always said that carousels were way to stop people beating each other up in meetings. I like the way Heydon puts it:

Carousels (or ‘content sliders’) are like men. They are not literally all bad — some are even helpful and considerate. But I don’t trust anyone unwilling to acknowledge a glaring pattern of awfulness. Also like men, I appreciate that many of you would rather just avoid dealing with carousels, but often don’t have the choice. Hence this article.

Sunday, November 19th, 2017

Ten Years Old – CSS Wizardry

Congratulations on a decade of publishing on your own site—you’re a blogging wizard, Harry!

Having this website changed and shaped my career. If you don’t have a blog, I urge you, start working on one this weekend. Your own blog, with your own content, at your own domain. It might just change your life.

Friday, November 17th, 2017

Animista

What a great way to play around with CSS animations!

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

Eric’s Archived Thoughts: Declining Complexity in CSS

I think Eric is absolutely right. The barrier to entry for accomplishing what you want with CSS is much lower now. It only seems more complicated if you’re used to doing things the old way.

I envy “the kids”, the ones just starting to learn front end now. They’re likely never going to know the pain of float drop, or wrestling with inline blocks, or not being able to center along one axis. They’re going to roll their eyes when we old-timers start grumbling about the old days and say, “Floats?!? Who ever thought floats would be a good way to lay out a page? That’s totally not what they’re for, anyone can see that! Were you all high as a kite, or just utterly stupid?” You know, the way “the kids” talked ten years ago, except then it was about using tables for layout.

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

The Contrast Swap Technique: Improved Image Performance with CSS Filters | CSS-Tricks

A clever performance trick for images:

  1. Reduce image contrast using a linear transform function (Photoshop can do this)
  2. Apply a contrast filter in CSS to the image to make up for the contrast removal

Wednesday, November 8th, 2017

A Responsive Accessible Table | Adrian Roselli

Following on from Richard’s article, here’s a deep dive into making HTML tables that are accessible and responsive.

Wednesday, November 1st, 2017

Rebuilding slack.com – Several People Are Coding

A really great case study of a code refactor by Mina, with particular emphasis on the benefits of CSS Grid, fluid typography, and accessibility.

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

Airplanes and Ashtrays – CSS Wizardry

Whenever you plan or design a system, you need to build in your own ashtrays—a codified way of dealing with the inevitability of somebody doing the wrong thing. Think of what your ideal scenario is—how do you want people to use whatever you’re building—and then try to identify any aspects of it which may be overly opinionated, prescriptive, or restrictive. Then try to preempt how people might try to avoid or circumvent these rules, and work back from there until you can design a safe middle-ground into your framework that can accept these deviations in the safest, least destructive way possible.

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

The Story of CSS Grid, from Its Creators · An A List Apart Article

It must be the day for documenting the history of CSS. Here’s an article by Aaron on the extraordinary success story of CSS Grid. A lot of the credit for that quite rightly goes to Rachel and Jen:

Starting with Rachel Andrew coming in and creating a ton of demos and excitement around CSS Grid with Grid by Example and starting to really champion it and show it to web developers and what it was capable of and the problems that it solves.

Then, a little bit later, Jen Simmons created something called Labs where she put a lot of demos that she created for CSS Grid up on the web and, again, continued that momentum and that wave of enthusiasm for CSS Grid with web developers in the community.

Building a CSS-only image gallery (with fallbacks)

A great step-by-step walkthrough of building a really nice image gallery without any JavaScript.

The end result is really impressive but there’s still the drawback that the browser history will be updated every time you click on an image thumbnail (because the functionality relies on ID attributes referenced via :target). Depending on your use-case, that may or may not be desirable.

A Look Back at the History of CSS | CSS-Tricks

The evolution of CSS, as told by the author of the excellent History of the Web newsletter.