Tags: end

2184

sparkline

Saturday, May 15th, 2021

Can I :has()

This would be such a great addition to CSS—a parent/ancestor selector!

With the combined might of :has(), :not(), nth-child(), and calc(), CSS has become a powerful language for specifying rules to account for all kinds of situations.

Wednesday, May 12th, 2021

Google Workspace Updates: Google Docs will now use canvas based rendering: this may impact some Chrome extensions

Yikes!

We’re updating the way Google Docs renders documents. Over the course of the next several months, we’ll be migrating the underlying technical implementation of Docs from the current HTML-based rendering approach to a canvas-based approach to improve performance and improve consistency in how content appears across different platforms.

I’ll be very interested to see how they handle the accessibility of this move.

Add support for defining a theme color for both light & dark modes (prefers color scheme)

There’s a good discussion here (kicked off by Jen) about providing different theme-color values in a web app manifest to match prefers-color-scheme in media queries.

Pixelhop new website walk through

A case study with equal emphasis on animation and performance.

Tuesday, May 11th, 2021

Design for reading: tips for optimizing content for Reader modes and reading apps

The more I consume content in reading apps, the more I am reminded of the importance and the power of progressive enhancement as a strategy to create resilient and malleable experiences that work for everyone, regardless of how they choose to consume our content.

Top stuff from Sara here!

We have a tendency to always make an assumption about how our readers are reading our content—probably in the browser, with our fancy styles applied to it. But if we make a habit out of thinking about the Web in layers and CSS as an enhancement on top of the content layer, then we can start optimizing and enhancing our users’ reading experiences regardless of their context.

Thinking about the different ways in which users access the Web only shines light on the importance of a progressively enhanced approach to building for the Web. The more we think about the Web in layers and try to improve the experience of one layer before moving to the next, the more resilient experiences we can create. That’s what the essence of progressive enhancement is about.

Work at Clearleft

A little while back, I wrote about how much I like the job description of a design engineer. I still have issues with the “engineer” part, but overall it’s a great way to describe a front-end developer who works on the front of the front end: the outputs that end users interact with: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. If it’s delivered in a web browser, then it’s design engineering.

Perhaps you also prefer the front of the front end to the back of the front end. Perhaps you also like to spend your time thinking about resilience, performance, and accessibility rather than build pipelines and frameworks. Perhaps you’d like to work with like-minded people.

Clearleft is hiring a midweight design engineer. Perhaps it’s you.

If you’d like to use your development talents in the service of good design, you should apply. And remember, you’d be working for yourself: Clearleft is an employee-owned agency.

You don’t have to be based in Brighton. You can work remotely, although we’re expecting that a monthly face-to-face gathering will become the norm after The Situation ends. So if you’re based somewhere like London, that would work out nicely. That said, if you’re based somewhere like London, this might also be the ideal opportunity to make a move to the seaside.

You do have to be eligible to work in the UK. Alas, that pool has shrunk somewhat. Thanks, Brexit.

Perhaps you think you’re not qualified. Apply anyway. You’ve got nothing to lose.

Perhaps this role isn’t for you, but you know someone who might fit the bill. Please tell them. Spread the word.

We’d especially love to hear from people under-represented in design and technology.

Come and work with us.

Monday, May 10th, 2021

The web we choose to build. Principles for user-centred front-end development by Colin Oakley

I was really chuffed to see some posts of mine referenced in this rather excellent piece about design principles for front-end development.

Building a resilient frontend using progressive enhancement - Service Manual - GOV.UK

Using progressive enhancement means your users will be able to do what they need to do if any part of the stack fails.

What a terrific short guide to sensible web development!

  • Start with HTML
    • Using interactive elements
    • Adding the extras
    • Building more complex services
    • Testing your service
    • Do not assume users turn off CSS or JavaScript
    • Case studies and related guides

Friday, May 7th, 2021

Simple things are complicated: making a show password option - Technology in government

This is a great deep dive into a single component, a password toggle in this case. It shows how assumptions are challenged and different circumstances are considered in order to make it truly resilient.

Sunday, May 2nd, 2021

Performance-testing the Google I/O site - JakeArchibald.com

Modern web development:

Imagine you went to a restaurant, took a seat, and 20 minutes later you still haven’t been given a menu. You ask where it is, and you’re told “oh, we’re currently cooking you everything you might possibly ask for. Then we’ll give you the menu, you’ll pick something, and we’ll be able to give you it instantly, because it’ll all be ready”.

Single page apps, ladies and gentlemen.

Thursday, April 29th, 2021

CSS Hell - To Hell with bad CSS!

Collection of common CSS mistakes, and how to fix them.

I like the way this is organised: it’s like “code smells” for CSS. Some of them will probably be familiar, in which case, you can dive in and find out what’s going on.

Saturday, April 24th, 2021

Still Hoping for Better Native Page Transitions | CSS-Tricks

It would be nice to be able to animate the transition between pages if we want to on the web without resorting to hacks or full-blown architecture choices to achieve it.

Amen, Chris, amen!

The danger here is that you might pick a single-page app just for this ability, which is what I mean by having to buy into a site architecture just to achieve this.

CSS Font Lorem Ipsum

Professional web designer on a closed course. Do not attempt.

Thursday, April 22nd, 2021

Midweight Design Engineer | Clearleft

Want to work with me? If so, come and be a design engineer at Clearleft!

What’s a design engineer? A front-end developer at the front of the front end who values accessibility, performance, and progressive enhancement.

We’re looking for a design-friendly front-end developer with demonstrable skills in pattern-based prototyping and production to join our friendly and supportive team in the heart of Brighton.

Even if this isn’t for you, please spread the word …especially to potential candidates who aren’t mediocre middle-aged white dudes (I’ve already got that demographic covered).

Tuesday, April 20th, 2021

Numbers

Core web vitals from Google are the ingredients for an alphabet soup of exlusionary intialisms. But once you get past the unnecessary jargon, there’s a sensible approach underpinning the measurements.

From May—no, June—these measurements will be a ranking signal for Google search so performance will become more of an SEO issue. This is good news. This is what Google should’ve done years ago instead of pissing up the wall with their dreadful and damaging AMP project that blackmailed publishers into using a proprietary format in exchange for preferential search treatment. It was all done supposedly in the name of performance, but in reality all it did was antagonise users and publishers alike.

Core web vitals are an attempt to put numbers on user experience. This is always a tricky balancing act. You’ve got to watch out for the McNamara fallacy. Harry has already started noticing this:

A new and unusual phenomenon: clients reluctant (even refusing) to fix performance issues unless they directly improve Vitals.

Once you put a measurement on something, there’s a danger of focusing too much on the measurement. Chris is worried that we’re going to see tips’n’tricks for gaming core web vitals:

This feels like the start of a weird new era of web performance where the metrics of web performance have shifted to user-centric measurements, but people are implementing tricky strategies to game those numbers with methods that, if anything, slightly harm user experience.

The map is not the territory. The numbers are a proxy for user experience, but it’s notoriously difficult to measure intangible ideas like pain and frustration. As Laurie says:

This is 100% the downside of automatic tools that give you a “score”. It’s like gameification. It’s about hitting that perfect score instead of the holistic experience.

And Ethan has written about the power imbalance that exists when Google holds all the cards, whether it’s AMP or core web vitals:

Google used its dominant position in the marketplace to force widespread adoption of a largely proprietary technology for creating websites. By switching to Core Web Vitals, those power dynamics haven’t materially changed.

We would do well to remember:

When you measure, include the measurer.

But if we’re going to put numbers to user experience, the core web vitals are a pretty good spread of measurements: largest contentful paint, cumulative layout shift, and first input delay.

(If you prefer using initialisms, remember that CFP is Certified Financial Planner, CLS is Community Legal Services, and FID is Flame Ionization Detector. Together they form CWV, Catholic War Veterans.)

Global performance insights for your site | Lighthouse Metrics

I hadn’t come across this before—run Lighthouse tests on your pages from six different locations around the world at once.

davatron5000/awesome-standalones

A curated list of awesome framework-agnostic standalone web components.

Monday, April 19th, 2021

My current HTML boilerplate - Manuel Matuzović

This is a great HTML boilerplate, with an explanation of every line.

Home · castastrophe/wc-theming-standards Wiki

I really like the idea of a shared convention for styling web components with custom properties—feels like BEM meets microformats.

Monday, April 12th, 2021

The Layers of the Web - Jeremy Keith - YouTube

Here’s the video of the talk I gave at the Web Stories conference back in February.

The Layers of the Web - Jeremy Keith