Tags: eot

12

sparkline

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Content Protection, fonts, and trolling « in progress

Chris defends himself from some inaccuracies I flung his way, regarding fonts and DRM.

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

Making Of ‘Peugeot - Paperwork’ on Vimeo

Kyle’s paper skills are truly impressive.

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009

Web fonts. Where are we? Will web fonts ever be a reality? | i love typography, the typography and fonts blog

A great round-up on the current state of web typography following TypeCon 2009.

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

How to create EOT files without Microsoft WEFT — Edward O’Connor

@font-face for all — Ted shows how to convert TTF files to EOT using the command line.

Friday, October 31st, 2008

Code: Flickr Developer Blog » The Shape of Alpha

Flickr has amassed tons of geotagging data and Aaron has been playing with it.

Saturday, October 18th, 2008

Ubiquitous web font embedding just got a step closer | Web Directions

John has come to the same conclusion as Richard with regards to font embedding. In short, the font foundries are missing a huge revenue stream. They could be offering fonts on a per-domain basis (a la Google Maps or any other third-party API). Rem…

Tuesday, April 1st, 2008

Home of the Geotag Icon Project

An attempt to create a standardised icon for geotagged content, much like the standardised icon for RSS.

Wednesday, November 21st, 2007

Photos taken in Brighton on Flickr!

Flickr Places. This is what George announced at dConstruct. It's enthralling: interestingness mashed up with geotagging.

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2006

Twitter / Rev Dan Catt: 10,000,059 geotagged photo,...

Via Reverend Dan Catt on Twitter comes word of over 10,100,000 getagged photos. Mazel tov!

Friday, November 3rd, 2006

Matrix locations in Sydney

When Eric and Tantek where in Sydney for Web Essentials 2005 they went off on a little jaunt that Eric dubbed urban spelunking. They went in search of locations from The Matrix, which was filmed in Sydney, donchyaknow.

“That looks like fun”, I thought. When I found myself in Sydney for Web Directions South, I resolved to follow in the footsteps of the futuristic hero dressed in black… no, not Neo; Tantek. I used location information gathered from Tantek's photos to find some street addresses. I also managed to find a couple of locations of my own.

Off I went with Jessica in tow and camera in hand. The resultant photos are up on Flickr. Evidently, I'm not the only one who got a kick out of this: the pictures have been dugg, sending their viewing figures into five digits.

For anyone else who wants to do a Matrix tour of Sydney, here's a list of locations and time stamps from the movie. They're all geotagged and encoded in hCard so you can go ahead and extract that data.

Adam Street Bridge The Adam Street bridge scene begins at 00:19:32. It's filmed at Campbell Street and Elizabeth Street.

Morpheus The crosswalk in the agent training programme is shown at 00:53:42. It's filmed at Martin Place and Pitt Street.

Woman in the red dress The fountain featuring the woman in the red dress appears 35 seconds later at 00:54:17. It's also filmed at Martin Place and Pitt Street.

Military controlled building The military controlled building where Morpheus is held comes into view at 01:25:47. The building is the Colonial State Bank Centre on Philip Street and Martin Place.

Phone call Neo comes out of the phonebooth at the end of the film at 2:03:30. You can find it across from Dymock's bookstore on the corner of Hunter Street and Pitt Street.

Metacortex The Metacortex building where Neo works is seen at 00:10:20 and is actually the Metcentre seen from Margaret Street and Carrington Street.

Monday, June 26th, 2006

Mashing up with microformats

Back in March, during South by Southwest, Tantek asked me if I’d like to sit in on his microformats panel alongside Chris Messina and Norm! The audio recording of the panel is now available through the conference podcast.

I’ve taken the liberty of having the recording transcribed (using castingWords.com) and I’ve posted a tidied up version of the transcript to the articles section: Microformats: Evolving the Web. You can listen along through the articles RSS feed which doubles up as a podcast.

I’ve also posted the transcript on the microformats wiki so that others can edit it if they catch any glaring mistakes in the transcription.

During the panel I talked about Adactio Austin, a fairly trivial use of microformats but one that I’ve been building upon. I’d like to provide some cut’n’paste JavaScript that would allow people to get some added value from using microformats. Supposing you have a bunch of locations marked up in hCard with geotags, you could drop in a script and have a map appear showing those locations.

Perhaps the geotagging won’t even be necessary. Google added a geocoder to their mapping API two weeks ago. The UK, alas, is not yet supported (probably because the Post Office won’t let go of its monopoly that easily… Postman Pat, your money-grabbing days are numbered).

Unfortunately, Google Maps isn’t very suited to the cut’n’paste idea: you have to register a different API key for each domain where you want to use the mapping API.

The Yahoo maps API is less draconian about registration but its lack of detailed UK maps makes it a non-starter for me.

Maybe I should step away from maps and concentrate on events instead. It probably wouldn’t be too hard too write a script to create a calendar based on any hCalendar data found in a document. Perhaps I’ll investigate the calendar widget from Yahoo.

Ultimately I’d like to create something like Chris’s Mapendar idea. If only there were enough hours in the day.

Sunday, April 2nd, 2006

Upcoming webolution

At the risk of becoming API-watch Central, I feel I must point out some nifty new features that have been added to Upcoming.org.

Andy and the gang have been diligently geotagging events using Yahoo’s geocoder API. Best of all, these latitude and longitude co-ordinates are now also being exposed through the API. Methinks Adactio Austin won’t be the last mashing up of event and map data I’ll be doing.

On the Upcoming site itself, you can now limit the number of attendees for an event, edit any venues you’ve added and edit your comments. This comes just a few days after Brian Suda mentioned in a chat that he would like to have the option to edit this comment later (right now he’s looking for somewhere to stay during XTech).

Feature wished for; feature added. This is exactly the kind of iterative, evolutionary growth that goes a long way towards what Kathy Sierra calls creating passionate users. By all accounts, her panel at South by Southwest was nothing short of outstanding. Everyone I spoke to who attended was raving about it for days. Muggins here missed it but I have a good excuse. I was busy signing freshly-purchased books, so I can’t complain.