Tags: evolution

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Tuesday, May 28th, 2019

Evolution of Webdesign

Funny because it’s true.

Sunday, February 17th, 2019

Is the universe pro-life? The Fermi paradox can help explain — Quartz

Living things are just a better way for nature to dissipate energy and increase the universe’s entropy.

No anthropocentric exceptionalism here; just the laws of thermodynamics.

According to the inevitable life theory, biological systems spontaneously emerge because they more efficiently disperse, or “dissipate” energy, thereby increasing the entropy of the surroundings. In other words, life is thermodynamically favorable.

As a consequence of this fact, something that seems almost magical happens, but there is nothing supernatural about it. When an inanimate system of particles, like a group of atoms, is bombarded with flowing energy (such as concentrated currents of electricity or heat), that system will often self-organize into a more complex configuration—specifically an arrangement that allows the system to more efficiently dissipate the incoming energy, converting it into entropy.

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018

UX past, present, and future | Clearleft

This long zoom by Andy is right up my alley—a history of UX design that begins in 1880. It’s not often that you get to read something that includes Don Norman, Doug Engelbart, Lilian Gilbreth, and Vladimir Lenin. So good!

Saturday, September 1st, 2018

The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity | CSS-Tricks

This is a terrific spot-on piece by Rachel. I firmly believe that healthy competition and diversity in the browser market is vital for the health of the web (which is why I’m always saddened and frustrated to hear web developers wish for a single monocultural rendering engine).

Tuesday, August 21st, 2018

Design Laws in Nature by Jordan Moore

A deep, deep dive into biomicry in digital design.

Nature is our outsourced research and development department. Observing problems solved by nature can help inform how we approach problems in digital design. Nature doesn’t like arbitrary features. It finds a way to shed unnecessary elements in advancing long-term goals over vast systems.

Monday, March 20th, 2017

1917. Free history.

Time-shifted reports from the Russian revolution, 100 years on.

All the texts used are taken from genuine documents written by historical figures: letters, memoirs, diaries and other documents of the period.

Every day, when you go onto the site, you will find out what happened exactly one hundred years ago: what various people were thinking about and what happened to each of them in this eventful year. You may not fast-forward into the future, but must follow events as they happen in real time.

Saturday, February 4th, 2017

The Computational Foundation of Life | Quanta Magazine

Philip Ball certainly has a way with words.

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Richard Dawkins, Mount Improbable: Play With Evolution

A lovely interactive demonstration of evolution, based on the original code Richard Dawkins used for Climbing Mount Improbable.

Friday, July 13th, 2012

Stephen Wolfram in The European magazine: I Like to Build Alien Artifacts

Thoughts on artificial intelligence, computation and complexity.

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

The Robot-Readable World – Blog – BERG

Wonderful musings from Matt on meeting the emerging machine intelligence halfway.

Monday, October 4th, 2010

Kevin Kelly and Steven Johnson on Where Ideas Come From | Magazine

You'll need to use Instapaper/Readability/Safari Reader to make it legible, but this conversation is well worth reading. Now I want to get those books.

Friday, May 28th, 2010

Evolution and Creativity: Why Humans Triumphed - WSJ.com

Matt Ridley's new book sounds like a corker.

Saturday, February 21st, 2009

Canvas Test

Conway's Game of Life executed using the canvas element.

Wednesday, October 17th, 2007

NCSE Resource

To counter the creationists' lists of "scientists who doubt evolution" here's a list of scientists named Steve who support Darwin's theory. (via Steven Pinker's Q&A after a lecture last week)

Monday, July 30th, 2007

Biologists Helping Bookstores

A blog devoted entirely to reshelving books in their correct categories in bookstores, specifically the science and religion categories. I approve.

Saturday, March 17th, 2007

Co-evolution of neocortex size, group size and language in humans

The Dunbar number gets bandied about a lot in conversations about social networks these days. Here's the original paper that shows the research behind the oft-misused term.

Friday, January 5th, 2007

The New Yorker: Game Master

A profile of Will Wright. I'm really looking forward to hearing him speak at SXSW this year.

Monday, December 18th, 2006

Today on 24 Ways

Drew has clearly forgotten how much work he put into last year’s advent calendar because he’s only gone and relaunched 24 Ways this year.

It being the 18th of December, the webby festivities are well underway so be sure to read through all the morsels that have been published thus far. Today it’s my turn to pop something out of the calendar. I’ve written a piece called Boost Your Hyperlink Power, dedicated to the humble hyperlink. It’s mostly about the little used rel and rev attributes.

I’ve also included some microformats in there. I’m particularly pleased with the example I came up with for vote-links:

I agree with <a href="http://richarddawkins.net/home" rev="vote-for">Richard Dawkins</a>
about those <a href="http://www.icr.org/" rev="vote-against">creationists</a>.

I’ll take any chance I can to strike a blow for science. Mind you, I’ve got nothing on Patrick: he’s managed to create entire case studies in his new book that champion evolutionary theory.

Maybe we should form a web ring of Humanist web developers: explaining semantic markup whilst battling against the forces of superstition and ignorance.

Monday, December 4th, 2006

CHARLES DARWIN HAS A POSSE! -- stickers in support of evolution

Brilliant! I need to get some sticker paper so I can print out this picture and put it on my laptop.

Monday, September 4th, 2006

Spore Gameplay Video - Google Video

Spore fascinates me. It looks like the kind of thing that could change gaming forever.