Tags: fluid

21

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Monday, December 19th, 2016

The math of CSS locks

A very very in-depth look at fluid typography in CSS using calc.

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Get the Balance Right: Responsive Display Text ◆ 24 ways

Some really great CSS tips from Rich on sizing display text for multiple viewports.

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

Told you so

One of the recurring themes at the Responsive Day Out was how much of a sea change responsive design is. More than once, it was compared to the change we went through going from table layouts to CSS …but on a much bigger scale.

Mark made the point that designing in a liquid way, rather than using media queries, is the real challenge for most people. I think he’s right. I think there’s an over-emphasis on media queries and breakpoints when we talk about responsive design. Frankly, media queries are, for me, the least interesting aspect. And yet, I often hear “media queries” and “responsive design” used interchangeably, as if they were synonyms.

Embracing the fluidity of the medium: that’s the really important bit. I agree with Mark’s assessment that the reason why designers and developers are latching on to media queries and breakpoints is a desire to return to designing for fixed canvases:

What started out as a method to optimise your designs for various screen widths has turned, ever so slowly, into multiple canvas design.

If you’re used to designing fixed-width layouts, it’s going to be really, really hard to get your head around designing and building in a fluid way …at first. In his talk, Elliot made the point that it will get easier once you get the hang of it:

Once you overcome that initial struggle of adapting to a new process, designing and building responsive sites needn’t take any longer, or cost any more money. The real obstacle is designers and developers being set in their ways. I know this because I was one of those people, and to those of you who’ve now fully embraced RWD, you may well be nodding in agreement: we all struggled with it to begin with, just like we did when we moved from table-based layout to CSS.

This is something I’ve been repeating again and again: we’re the ones who imposed the fixed-width constraint onto the medium. If we had listened to John Allsopp and embraced the web for the inherently fluid medium it is, we wouldn’t be having such a hard time getting our heads around responsive design.

But I feel I should clarify something. I’ve been saying “we” have been building fixed-width sites. That isn’t strictly true. I’ve never built a fixed-width website in my life.

Some people find this literally unbelievable. On the most recent Happy Mondays podcast, Sarah said:

I doubt anyone can hold their hands up and say they’ve exclusively worked in fluid layouts since we moved from tables.

Well, my hand is up. And actually, I was working with fluid layouts even when we were still using tables for layout: you can apply percentages to tables too.

Throughout my career, even if the final site was going to be fixed width, I’d still build it in a fluid way, using percentages for widths. At the very end, I’d slap on one CSS declaration on the body to fix the width to whatever size was fashionable at the time: 760px, 960px, whatever …that declaration could always be commented out later if the client saw the light.

Actually, I remember losing work back when I was a freelancer because I was so adamant that a site should be fluid rather than fixed. I was quite opinionated and stubborn on that point.

A search through the archives of my journal attests to that:

Way back in 2003, I wrote:

It seems to me that, all too often, designers make the decision to go with a fixed width design because it is the easier path to tread. I don’t deny that liquid design can be hard. To make a site that scales equally well to very wide as well as very narrow resolutions is quite a challenge.

In 2004, I wrote:

Cast off your fixed-width layouts; you have nothing to lose but your WYSIWYG mentality!

I just wouldn’t let it go. I said:

So maybe I should be making more noise. I could become the web standards equivalent of those loonies with the sandwich boards, declaiming loudly that the end is nigh.

At my very first South by Southwest in 2005, in a hotel room at 5am, when I should’ve been partying, I was explaining to Keith why liquid layouts were the way to go.

Fixed width vs Liquid

That’s just sad.

So you’ll forgive me if I feel a certain sense of vindication now that everyone is finally doing what I’ve been banging on about for years.

I know that it’s very unbecoming of me to gloat. But if you would indulge me for a moment…

I TOLD YOU! YOU DIDN’T LISTEN BUT I TOLD YOU! LIQUID LAYOUTS, I SAID. BUT, OH NO, YOU INSISTED ON CLINGING TO YOUR FIXED WIDTH WAYS LIKE A BUNCH OF BLOODY SHEEP. WELL, YOU’RE LISTENING NOW, AREN’T YOU? HAH!

Ahem.

I’m sorry. That was very undignified. It’s just that, after TEN BLOODY YEARS, I just had to let it out. It’s not often I get to do that.

Now, does anyone want to revisit the discussion about having comments on blogs?

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Resizable Displays | Fluid Interfaces

See now, this is why liquid layouts are the way to go.

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

LukeW | Multi-Device Layout Patterns

Luke catalogues layout patterns in responsive designs.

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

The ‘trouble’ with Android | Stephanie Rieger

Stephanie focuses on Android but this is a cautionary tale about trying to impose control over what you’re sending to the multitude of mobile devices out there.

Designing to fixed screen sizes is in fact never a good idea…there is just too much variation, even amongst ‘popular’ devices.

Saturday, November 19th, 2011

Responsive Design Essentials: Look Great on any Device - Facebook developers

The process behind the mobile-first responsive design of audiovroom.com.

Monday, November 14th, 2011

You Say Responsive, I Say Adaptive | Sparkbox

On the importance of using a fluid grid in responsive design.

Friday, October 28th, 2011

Foundation: Rapid Prototyping and Building Framework from ZURB

A framework for banging out ready-made responsive designs.

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

Fluid Baseline Grid - A sensible HTML5 and CSS3 development kit

A set of default styles to get started on a mobile-first responsive design.

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Golden Grid System

I’m usually not a fan of CSS “frameworks” but I like the thinking that’s gone into this fluid, responsive system. I particularly like this advice:

Take it apart, steal the parts that you like, and adapt them to your own way of working.

Saturday, July 23rd, 2011

ProtoFluid. Rapid Prototyping of Adaptive CSS and Responsive Design.

Another browser-based tool for testing your responsive designs at different screen sizes.

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

You Say Responsive, I Say Adaptive | Sparkbox

On the importance of using fluid grids as part of responsive web design:

We do responsive web design, but we don’t do it for the sake of being trendy. We do it because we believe it’s the way websites should be made. This is an opportunity for us to finally embrace the dynamic medium we build for. The web is not fixed width.

Sunday, June 5th, 2011

Hand Crafted Web design Kawartha Lakes, Lindsay, Peterborough | Bitfoundry

A thoroughly lovely responsive design, very nicely and thoughtfully executed.

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

Fit To Scale | Trent Walton

More documentation of a responsive redesign, this time from Trent Walton. Be sure to check out the FitText jQuery plug-in that was created as a result.

Design for the changing web: Our response :: Studio :: Headshift

Documenting the process of switching to a responsive design. I think there’s always insight to be gained from seeing how your peers are approaching these challenges.

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010

Information Architects

A great example of responsive web design. I like the idea of upping the font size for really large viewports. I may do that on Huffduffer.

Monday, August 30th, 2010

TeuxDeux Part Deux

I’ve tried a few different to-do list apps in my time: Ta-da List, Remember The Milk. They’re all much of a muchness (although Remember The Milk’s inability to remember me on return visits put me off it after a while).

The one that really fits with my mental model is TuexDeux. It’s very, very simple and that’s its strength. It does one thing really well.

Now it has been updated with a few little changes.

TeuxDeux Part Deux on Vimeo

I’m very pleased to see that it has become more flexible and fluid. I’ve said it before but I really think that web apps should aim to be adaptable to the user’s preferred viewing window. With more content-driven sites, such as webzines and news articles, I understand why more control is given to the content creator, but for an application, where usage and interaction is everything, flexibility and adaptability should be paramount, in my opinion.

Anyway, the new changes to TeuxDeux make it better than ever. Although…

If I had one complaint—and this is going to sound kind of weird—it’s that you mark items as done by clicking on them (as if they were links). I kind of miss the feeling of satisfaction that comes with ticking a checkbox to mark an item as done.

I told you it was going to sound kind of weird.

Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010

Finally ° a fluid Hicksdesign ° The Hickensian ° Hicksdesign

Jon gets flexible. This is the mark of a true web designer.

Sunday, April 19th, 2009

Fluid Images — Unstoppable Robot Ninja

Ethan follows up his Fluid Grids article with an equally excellent piece on resizing images.