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Wednesday, May 8th, 2019

Timing out

Service workers are great for creating a good user experience when someone is offline. Heck, the book I wrote about service workers is literally called Going Offline.

But in some ways, the offline experience is relatively easy to handle. It’s a binary situation; either you’re online or you’re offline. What’s more challenging—and probably more common—is the situation that Jake calls Lie-Fi. That’s when technically you’ve got a network connection …but it’s a shitty connection, like one bar of mobile signal. In that situation, because there’s technically a connection, the user gets a slow frustrating experience. Whatever code you’ve got in your service worker for handling offline situations will never get triggered. When you’re handling fetch events inside a service worker, there’s no automatic time-out.

But you can make one.

That’s what I’ve done recently here on adactio.com. Before showing you what I added to my service worker script to make that happen, let me walk you through my existing strategy for handling offline situations.

Service worker strategies

Alright, so in my service worker script, I’ve got a block of code for handling requests from fetch events:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
        const request = fetchEvent.request;
    // Do something with this request.
});

I’ve got two strategies in my code. One is for dealing with requests for pages:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    // Code for handling page requests.
}

By adding an else clause I can have a different strategy for dealing with requests for anything else—images, style sheets, scripts, and so on:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    // Code for handling page requests.
} else {
    // Code for handling everthing else.
}

For page requests, I’m going to try to go the network first:

fetchEvent.respondWith(
    fetch(request)
    .then( responseFromFetch => {
        return responseFromFetch;
    })

My logic is:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network.

If that doesn’t work, we’re in an offline situation. That triggers the catch clause. That’s where I have my offline strategy: show a custom offline page that I’ve previously cached (during the install event):

.catch( fetchError => {
    return caches.match('/offline');
})

Now my logic has been expanded to this:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network, but if that doesn’t work, show a custom offline page instead.

So my overall code for dealing with requests for pages looks like this:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
        fetch(request)
        .then( responseFromFetch => {
            return responseFromFetch;
        })
        .catch( fetchError => {
            return caches.match('/offline');
        })
    );
}

Now I can fill in the else statement that handles everything else—images, style sheets, scripts, and so on. Here my strategy is different. I’m looking in my caches first, and I only fetch the file from network if the file can’t be found in any cache:

caches.match(request)
.then( responseFromCache => {
    return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
})

Here’s all that fetch-handling code put together:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            fetch(request)
            .then( responseFromFetch => {
                return responseFromFetch;
            })
            .catch( fetchError => {
                return caches.match('/offline');
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
        })
    }
});

Good.

Cache as you go

Now I want to introduce an extra step in the part of the code where I deal with requests for pages. Whenever I fetch a page from the network, I’m going to take the opportunity to squirrel it away in a cache. I’m calling that cache “pages”. I’m imaginative like that.

fetchEvent.respondWith(
    fetch(request)
    .then( responseFromFetch => {
        const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
        try {
            fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                caches.open('pages')
                .then( pagesCache => {
                    return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                })
            )
        } catch(error) {
            console.error(error);
        }
        return responseFromFetch;
    })

You’ll notice that I can’t put the response itself (responseFromCache) into the cache. That’s a stream that I only get to use once. Instead I need to make a copy:

const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();

That’s what gets put in the pages cache:

fetchEvent.waitUntil(
    caches.open('pages')
    .then( pagesCache => {
        return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
    })
)

Now my logic for page requests has an extra piece to it:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, show a custom offline page instead.

Here’s my updated fetch-handling code:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            fetch(request)
            .then( responseFromFetch => {
                const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
                try {
                    fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                        caches.open('pages')
                        .then( pagesCache => {
                            return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                        })
                    )
                } catch(error) {
                    console.error(error);
                }
                return responseFromFetch;
            })
            .catch( fetchError => {
                return caches.match('/offline');
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
        })
    }
});

I call this the cache-as-you-go pattern. The more pages someone views on my site, the more pages they’ll have cached.

Now that there’s an ever-growing cache of previously visited pages, I can update my offline fallback. Currently, I reach straight for the custom offline page:

.catch( fetchError => {
    return caches.match('/offline');
})

But now I can try looking for a cached copy of the requested page first:

.catch( fetchError => {
    caches.match(request)
    .then( responseFromCache => {
        return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
    })
});

Now my offline logic is expanded:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, first look for an existing copy in a cache, and otherwise show a custom offline page instead.

I can also access this ever-growing cache of pages from my custom offline page to show people which pages they can revisit, even if there’s no internet connection.

So far, so good. Everything I’ve outlined so far is a good robust strategy for handling offline situations. Now I’m going to deal with the lie-fi situation, and it’s that cache-as-you-go strategy that sets me up nicely.

Timing out

I want to throw this addition into my logic:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, first look for an existing copy in a cache, and otherwise show a custom offline page instead (but if the request is taking too long, try to show a cached version of the page).

The first thing I’m going to do is rewrite my code a bit. If the fetch event is for a page, I’m going to respond with a promise:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
        new Promise( resolveWithResponse => {
            // Code for handling page requests.
        })
    );
}

Promises are kind of weird things to get your head around. They’re tailor-made for doing things asynchronously. You can set up two parameters; a success condition and a failure condition. If the success condition is executed, then we say the promise has resolved. If the failure condition is executed, then the promise rejects.

In my re-written code, I’m calling the success condition resolveWithResponse (and I haven’t bothered with a failure condition, tsk, tsk). I’m going to use resolveWithResponse in my promise everywhere that I used to have a return statement:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            new Promise( resolveWithResponse => {
                fetch(request)
                .then( responseFromFetch => {
                    const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
                    try {
                        fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                            caches.open('pages')
                            then( pagesCache => {
                                return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                            })
                        )
                    } catch(error) {
                        console.error(error);
                    }
                    resolveWithResponse(responseFromFetch);
                })
                .catch( fetchError => {
                    caches.match(request)
                    .then( responseFromCache => {
                        resolveWithResponse(
                            responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline')
                        );
                    })
                })
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
        })
    }
});

By itself, rewriting my code as a promise doesn’t change anything. Everything’s working the same as it did before. But now I can introduce the time-out logic. I’m going to put this inside my promise:

const timer = setTimeout( () => {
    caches.match(request)
    .then( responseFromCache => {
        if (responseFromCache) {
            resolveWithResponse(responseFromCache);
        }
    })
}, 3000);

If a request takes three seconds (3000 milliseconds), then that code will execute. At that point, the promise attempts to resolve with a response from the cache instead of waiting for the network. If there is a cached response, that’s what the user now gets. If there isn’t, then the wait continues for the network.

The last thing left for me to do is cancel the countdown to timing out if a network response does return within three seconds. So I put this in the then clause that’s triggered by a successful network response:

clearTimeout(timer);

I also add the clearTimeout statement to the catch clause that handles offline situations. Here’s the final code:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            new Promise( resolveWithResponse => {
                const timer = setTimeout( () => {
                    caches.match(request)
                    .then( responseFromCache => {
                        if (responseFromCache) {
                            resolveWithResponse(responseFromCache);
                        }
                    })
                }, 3000);
                fetch(request)
                .then( responseFromFetch => {
                    clearTimeout(timer);
                    const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
                    try {
                        fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                            caches.open('pages')
                            then( pagesCache => {
                                return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                            })
                        )
                    } catch(error) {
                        console.error(error);
                    }
                    resolveWithResponse(responseFromFetch);
                })
                .catch( fetchError => {
                    clearTimeout(timer);
                    caches.match(request)
                    .then( responseFromCache => {
                        resolveWithResponse(
                            responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline')
                        );
                    })
                })
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request)
        })
    }
});

That’s the JavaScript translation of this logic:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, first look for an existing copy in a cache, and otherwise show a custom offline page instead (but if the request is taking too long, try to show a cached version of the page).

For everything else, try finding a cached version first, otherwise fetch it from the network.

Pros and cons

As with all service worker enhancements to a website, this strategy will do absolutely nothing for first-time visitors. If you’ve never visited my site before, you’ve got nothing cached. But the more you return to the site, the more your cache is primed for speedy retrieval.

I think that serving up a cached copy of a page when the network connection is flaky is a pretty good strategy …most of the time. If we’re talking about a blog post on this site, then sure, there won’t be much that the reader is missing out on—a fixed typo or ten; maybe some additional webmentions at the end of a post. But if we’re talking about the home page, then a reader with a flaky network connection might think there’s nothing new to read when they’re served up a stale version.

What I’d really like is some way to know—on the client side—whether or not the currently-loaded page came from a cache or from a network. Then I could add some kind of interface element that says, “Hey, this page might be stale—click here if you want to check for a fresher version.” I’d also need some way in the service worker to identify any requests originating from that interface element and make sure they always go out to the network.

I think that should be doable somehow. If you can think of a way to do it, please share it. Write a blog post and send me the link.

But even without the option to over-ride the time-out, I’m glad that I’m at least doing something to handle the lie-fi situation. Perhaps I should write a sequel to Going Offline called Still Online But Only In Theory Because The Connection Sucks.

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

Unraveling The JPEG

A deep, deep, deep dive into the JPEG format. Best of all, it’s got interactive explanations you can tinker with, a la Nicky Case or Bret Victor.

Test the impact of ads and third party scripts

This is a very useful new feature in Calibre, the performance monitoring tool. Now you can get data about just how much third-party scripts are affecting your site’s performance:

The best way of circumventing fear and anxiety around third party script performance is to capture metrics that clearly articulate their performance impact.

Tuesday, April 30th, 2019

Progressive Font Enrichment: reinventing web font performance | Responsive Web Typography

Jason describes the next big thing in web typography: streaming fonts!

…to enable the ability for only the required part of the font be downloaded on any given page, and for subsequent requests for that font to dynamically ‘patch’ the original download with additional sets of glyphs as required on successive page views—even if they occur on separate sites.

Monday, April 29th, 2019

Naming things to improve accessibility

Some good advice from Hidde, based on his recent talk Six ways to make your site more accessible.

Sunday, April 28th, 2019

Norbert Wiener’s Human Use of Human Beings is more relevant than ever.

What would Wiener think of the current human use of human beings? He would be amazed by the power of computers and the internet. He would be happy that the early neural nets in which he played a role have spawned powerful deep-learning systems that exhibit the perceptual ability he demanded of them—although he might not be impressed that one of the most prominent examples of such computerized Gestalt is the ability to recognize photos of kittens on the World Wide Web.

Friday, April 26th, 2019

How I failed the <a>

I think the situation that Remy outlines here is quite common (in client-rehydrated server-rendered pages), but what’s less common is Remy’s questioning and iteration.

So I now have a simple rule of thumb: if there’s an onClick, there’s got to be an anchor around the component.

Wednesday, April 24th, 2019

Preload, prefetch and other link tags: what they do and when to use them · PerfPerfPerf

Following on from Harry’s slides, here’s another round-up of thoserel attribute values that begin with pre.

More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About Resource Hints - Speaker Deck

Slides from Harry’s deep dive into rel values: preconnect, prefetch, and preload.

Friday, April 12th, 2019

Google AMP lowered our page speed, and there’s no choice but to use it - unlike kinds

What happens when you’re AMP pages are slower than your regular pages …but you’re forced to use AMP anyway if you want to appear in the top stories carousel.

AMP isn’t about speed. It’s about control.

The elephant in the room here is pre-rendering: that’s why Google aren’t using page speed alone as a determining factor for what goes in the carousel.

Monday, April 8th, 2019

User interfaces: hiding stuff should be a last resort by Adam Silver

When we hide content, there’s a greater risk the user won’t see it. There’s a higher reliance on digital literacy and it’s generally more labour intensive for the user.

Worse still, sometimes we kill off essential content.

AddyOsmani.com - Native image lazy-loading for the web!

The loading attribute for images and iframes is coming to Chrome. The best part:

You can also use loading as a progressive enhancement. Browsers that support the attribute can get the new lazy-loading behavior with loading=lazy and those that don’t will still have images load.

Sunday, April 7th, 2019

Drag’n’drop revisited

I got a message from a screen-reader user of The Session recently, letting me know of a problem they were having. I love getting any kind of feedback around accessibility, so this was like gold dust to me.

They pointed out that the drag’n’drop interface for rearranging the order of tunes in a set was inaccessible.

Drag and drop

Of course! I slapped my forehead. How could I have missed this?

It had been a while since I had implemented that functionality, so before even looking at the existing code, I started to think about how I could improve the situation. Maybe I could capture keystroke events from the arrow keys and announce changes via ARIA values? That sounded a bit heavy-handed though: mess with people’s native keyboard functionality at your peril.

Then I looked at the code. That was when I realised that the fix was going to be much, much easier than I thought.

I documented my process of adding the drag’n’drop functionality back in 2016. Past me had his progressive enhancement hat on:

One of the interfaces needed for this feature was a form to re-order items in a list. So I thought to myself, “what’s the simplest technology to enable this functionality?” I came up with a series of select elements within a form.

Reordering

The problem was in my feature detection:

There’s a little bit of mustard-cutting going on: does the dragula object exist, and does the browser understand querySelector? If so, the select elements are hidden and the drag’n’drop is enabled.

The logic was fine, but the execution was flawed. I was being lazy and hiding the select elements with display: none. That hides them visually, but it also hides them from screen readers. I swapped out that style declaration for one that visually hides the elements, but keeps them accessible and focusable.

It was a very quick fix. I had the odd sensation of wanting to thank Past Me for making things easy for Present Me. But I don’t want to talk about time travel because if we start talking about it then we’re going to be here all day talking about it, making diagrams with straws.

I pushed the fix, told the screen-reader user who originally contacted me, and got a reply back saying that everything was working great now. Success!

Thursday, March 28th, 2019

Responsible JavaScript: Part I · An A List Apart Article

As I pick apart yet another bundle not unlike a tangled ball of Christmas tree lights, it’s become clear that the web is drunk on JavaScript. We reach for it for almost everything, even when the occasion doesn’t call for it. Sometimes I wonder how vicious the hangover will be.

I love everything about this article and I can’t wait for part two.

What we tend to forget is that the environment websites and web apps occupy is one and the same. Both are subject to the same environmental pressures that the large gradient of networks and devices impose. Those constraints don’t suddenly vanish when we decide to call what we build “apps”, nor do our users’ phones gain magical new powers when we do so.

Needless to say, I endorse this message:

Whether you think of your site as an “app” or not, adding a service worker to it is perhaps one of the most responsible uses of JavaScript that exists today.

Monday, March 25th, 2019

Stuffing the Front End

53% of mobile visits leave a page that takes longer than 3 seconds to load. That means that a large number of visitors probably abandoned these sites because they were staring at a blank screen for 3 seconds, said “fuck it,” and left approximately half way before the page showed up. The fact that the next page interaction would have been quicker—assuming all the JS files even downloaded correctly in the first attempt—doesn’t amount to much if they didn’t stick around for the first page to load. What was gained by putting the business logic in the front end in this scenario?

Sunday, March 24th, 2019

Always Own Your Platform

Stop giving away your work to people who don’t care about it. Host it yourself. Distribute it via methods you control. Build your audience deliberately and on your own terms.

Friday, March 22nd, 2019

Who has the fastest website in F1? - JakeArchibald.com

I think I physically winced on more than one occassion as I read through Jake’s report here.

He makes an interesting observation at the end:

However, none of the teams used any of the big modern frameworks. They’re mostly Wordpress & Drupal, with a lot of jQuery. It makes me feel like I’ve been in a bubble in terms of the technologies that make up the bulk of the web.

Yes! This! Contrary to what you might think reading through the latest and greatest tips and tricks from the front-end community, the vast majority of sites out there on the web are not being built with React, Vue, webpack or any other “modern” tools.

Gutenberg and the Internet

Steven Pemberton’s presentation on the printing press, the internet, Moore’s Law, and exponential growth.

Monday, March 18th, 2019

The Lean Web video from Boston CSS | Go Make Things

A good talk from from Chris Ferdinandi, who says:

One of the central themes of my talk on The Lean Web is that we as developers repeatedly take all of the great things the web and browsers give us out-of-the-box, break them, and then re-implement them poorly with JavaScript.

Friday, March 15th, 2019