Tags: google amp

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Sunday, October 29th, 2017

The meaning of AMP

Ethan quite rightly points out some semantic sleight of hand by Google’s AMP team:

But when I hear AMP described as an open, community-led project, it strikes me as incredibly problematic, and more than a little troubling. AMP is, I think, best described as nominally open-source. It’s a corporate-led product initiative built with, and distributed on, open web technologies.

But so what, right? Tom-ay-to, tom-a-to. Well, here’s a pernicious example of where it matters: in a recent announcement of their intent to ship a new addition to HTML, the Google Chrome team cited the mood of the web development community thusly:

Web developers: Positive (AMP team indicated desire to start using the attribute)

If AMP were actually the product of working web developers, this justification would make sense. As it is, we’ve got one team at Google citing the preference of another team at Google but representing it as the will of the people.

This is just one example of AMP’s sneaky marketing where some finely-shaved semantics allows them to appear far more reasonable than they actually are.

At AMP Conf, the Google Search team were at pains to repeat over and over that AMP pages wouldn’t get any preferential treatment in search results …but they appear in a carousel above the search results. Now, if you were to ask any right-thinking person whether they think having their page appear right at the top of a list of search results would be considered preferential treatment, I think they would say hell, yes! This is the only reason why The Guardian, for instance, even have AMP versions of their content—it’s not for the performance benefits (their non-AMP pages are faster); it’s for that prime real estate in the carousel.

The same semantic nit-picking can be found in their defence of caching. See, they’ve even got me calling it caching! It’s hosting. If I click on a search result, and I am taken to page that has a URL beginning with https://www.google.com/amp/s/... then that page is being hosted on the domain google.com. That is literally what hosting means. Now, you might argue that the original version was hosted on a different domain, but the version that the user gets sent to is the Google copy. You can call it caching if you like, but you can’t tell me that Google aren’t hosting AMP pages.

That’s a particularly low blow, because it’s such a bait’n’switch. One of the reasons why AMP first appeared to be different to Facebook Instant Articles or Apple News was the promise that you could host your AMP pages yourself. That’s the very reason I first got interested in AMP. But if you actually want the benefits of AMP—appearing in the not-search-results carousel, pre-rendered performance, etc.—then your pages must be hosted by Google.

So, to summarise, here are three statements that Google’s AMP team are currently peddling as being true:

  1. AMP is a community project, not a Google project.
  2. AMP pages don’t receive preferential treatment in search results.
  3. AMP pages are hosted on your own domain.

I don’t think those statements are even truthy, much less true. In fact, if I were looking for the right term to semantically describe any one of those statements, the closest in meaning would be this:

A statement used intentionally for the purpose of deception.

That is the dictionary definition of a lie.

Update: That last part was a bit much. Sorry about that. I know it’s a bit much because The Register got all gloaty about it.

I don’t think the developers working on the AMP format are intentionally deceptive (although they are engaging in some impressive cognitive gymnastics). The AMP ecosystem, on the other hand, that’s another story—the preferential treatment of Google-hosted AMP pages in the carousel and in search results; that’s messed up.

Still, I would do well to remember that there are well-meaning people working on even the fishiest of projects.

Except for the people working at the shitrag that is The Register.

(The other strong signal that I overstepped the bounds of decency was that this post attracted the pond scum of Hacker News. That’s another place where the “well-meaning people work on even the fishiest of projects” rule definitely doesn’t apply.)

Saturday, April 1st, 2017

AMP: breaking news | Andrew Betts

A wide-ranging post from Andrew on the downsides of Google’s AMP solution.

I don’t agree with all the issues he has with the format itself (in my opinion, the fact that AMP pages can’t have script elements is a feature, not a bug), but I wholeheartedly concur with his concerns about the AMP cache:

It recklessly devalues the URL

Spot on! And as Andrew points out, in this age of fake news, devaluing the URL is a recipe for disaster.

It’s hard to avoid the idea that the primary objective of AMP is really about hosting publisher content inside the Google ecosystem (as is more obviously the objective of Facebook Instant Articles and Apple News).

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

The Problem With AMP | 80x24

The largest complaint by far is that the URLs for AMP links differ from the canonical URLs for the same content, making sharing difficult. The current URLs are a mess.

This is something that the Google gang are aware of, and they say they’re working on a fix. But this post points out some other misgivings with AMP, like its governance policy:

This keeps the AMP HTML specification squarely in the hands of Google, who will be able to take it in any direction that they see fit without input from the community at large. This guise of openness is perhaps even worse than the Apple News Format, which at the very least does not pretend to be an open standard.

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

From WordPress to Apple News, Instant Articles, and AMP - The Media Temple Blog

Chris runs through the process and pitfalls of POSSEing a site (like CSS Tricks) to Apple’s News app, Facebook’s Instant Articles, and Google’s AMP.

Hey, whatever you want. As long as…

  1. It’s not very much work
  2. The content’s canonical home is my website.

I just want people to read and like CSS-Tricks.

Saturday, August 6th, 2016

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: AMP your content - A Preview of AMP’ed results in Search

Google’s search results now include AMP pages in the regular list of results (not just in a carousel). They’re marked with a little grey lightning bolt next to the word AMP.

The experience of opening of those results is certainly fast, but feels a little weird—like you haven’t really gone to the website yet, but instead that you’re still tethered to the search results page.

Clicking on a link within an AMP spawns a new window, which reinforces the idea of the web as something separate to AMP (much as they still like to claim that AMP is “a subset of HTML”—at this point, it really, really isn’t).

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Backdoor Service Workers

When I was moderating that panel at the Progressive Web App dev Summit, I brought up this point about twenty minutes in:

Alex, in your talk yesterday you were showing the AMP demo there with the Washington Post. You click through and there’s the Washington Post AMP thing, and it was able to install the Service Worker with that custom element. But I was looking at the URL bar …and that wasn’t the Washington Post. It was on the CDN from AMP. So I talked to Paul Backaus from the AMP team, and he explained that it’s an iframe, and using an iframe you can install a Service Worker from somewhere else.

Alex and Emily explained that, duh, that’s the way iframes work. It makes sense when you think about it—an iframe is pretty much the same as any other browser window. Still, it feels like it might violate the principle of least surprise.

Let’s say you followed my tongue-in-cheek advice to build a progressive web app store. Your homepage might have the latest 10 or 20 progressive web apps. You could also include 10 or 20 iframes so that those sites are “pre-installed” for the person viewing your page.

Enough theory. Here’s a practical example…

Suppose you’ve never visited the website for my book, html5forwebdesigners.com (if you have visited it, and you want to play along with this experiment, go to your browser settings and delete anything stored by that domain).

You happen to visit my website adactio.com. There’s a little blurb buried down on the home page that says “Read my book” with a link through to html5forwebdesigners.com. I’ve added this markup after the link:

<iframe src="https://html5forwebdesigners.com/iframe.html" style="width: 0; height: 0; border: 0">
</iframe>

That hidden iframe pulls in an empty page with a script element:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<title>HTML5 For Web Designers</title>
<script>
if ('serviceWorker' in navigator) {
  navigator.serviceWorker.register('/serviceworker.js');
}
</script>
</head>
</html>

That registers the Service Worker on my book’s site which then proceeds to install all the assets it needs to render the entire site offline.

There you have it. Without ever visiting the domain html5forwebdesigners.com, the site has been pre-loaded onto your device because you visited the domain adactio.com.

A few caveats:

  1. I had to relax the Content Security Policy for html5forwebdesigners.com to allow the iframe to be embedded on adactio.com:

    Header always set Access-Control-Allow-Origin: "https://adactio.com"
    
  2. If your browser’s settings has “Block third-party cookies and site data” selected in the preferences, the iframe-invoked Service Worker won’t install:

    Uncaught (in promise) DOMException: Failed to register a ServiceWorker: The user denied permission to use Service Worker.
    

The example I’ve put together here is relatively harmless. But it’s possible to imagine more extreme scenarios. Imagine there’s a publishing company that has 50 websites for 50 different publications. Each one of them could have an empty page waiting to be embedded via iframe from the other 49 sites. You only need to visit one page on one of those 50 sites to have 50 Service Workers spun up and caching assets in the background.

There’s the potential here for a tragedy of the commons. I hope we’ll be sensible about how we use this power.

Just don’t tell the advertising industry about this.