Tags: headers

10

sparkline

Saturday, June 23rd, 2018

I discovered a browser bug - JakeArchibald.com

Jake’s blow-by-blow account of uncovering a serious browser vulnerability is fascinating. But if you don’t care for the technical details, skip ahead to to how different browser makers handled the issue—it’s very enlightening. (And if you do care for the technical details, make sure you click on the link to the PDF version of this post.)

Sunday, June 17th, 2018

Detecting image requests in service workers

In Going Offline, I dive into the many different ways you can use a service worker to handle requests. You can filter by the URL, for example; treating requests for pages under /blog or /articles differently from other requests. Or you can filter by file type. That way, you can treat requests for, say, images very differently to requests for HTML pages.

One of the ways to check what kind of request you’re dealing with is to see what’s in the accept header. Here’s how I show the test for HTML pages:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    // Handle your page requests here.
}

So, logically enough, I show the same technique for detecting image requests:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('image')) {
    // Handle your image requests here.
}

That should catch any files that have image in the request’s accept header, like image/png or image/jpeg or image/svg+xml and so on.

But there’s a problem. Both Safari and Firefox now use a much broader accept header: */*

My if statement evaluates to false in those browsers. Sebastian Eberlein wrote about his workaround for this issue, which involves looking at file extensions instead:

if (request.url.match(/\.(jpe?g|png|gif|svg)$/)) {
    // Handle your image requests here.
}

So consider this post a patch for chapter five of Going Offline (page 68 specifically). Wherever you see:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('image'))

Swap it out for:

if (request.url.match(/\.(jpe?g|png|gif|svg)$/))

And feel to add any other image file extensions (like webp) in there too.

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

Understanding the WebView Viewport in iOS 11 - Ayogo Health Inc.

One more reason not to use sticky headers on mobile.

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

thebaer/MMRA: Make Medium Readable Again — a browser extension

I’ve gotten a little tired of showing up to a Medium-powered site on a non-medium.com domain and getting badgered to Sign Up! or Get Updates! when I’m already a Medium user.

A Chrome extension to Make Medium Readable Again by:

  • Keeping the top navigation bar from sticking around
  • Hiding the bottom “Get Updates” bar completely
  • (Optionally) hiding the clap / share bar
  • (Optionally) loading all post images up front, instead of lazy loading as you scroll

Shame there isn’t a mobile version to get rid of the insulting install-our-app permabutton.

Friday, April 15th, 2016

GitHub’s CSP journey - GitHub Engineering

A step-by-step walkthrough of how GitHub has tweaked its Content Security Policy over time. There are some valuable insights here, and I’m really, really happy to see companies share this kind of information.

Monday, March 14th, 2016

Service Workers: Save your User’s Data using the Save-Data Header | Dean Hume

I hadn’t heard of the save-data header. This article shows how you can use a Service Worker to sniff for it and serve up smaller assets, but I’m guessing you could also sniff for it from the server.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

Homebrew header hardening

I’m at Homebrew Website Club. I figured I’d use this time to document some tweaking I’ve been doing to the back end of my website.

securityheaders.io is a handy site for testing whether your website’s server is sending sensible headers. Think of it like SSL Test for a few nitty-gritty details.

adactio.com was initially scoring very low, but the accompanying guide to hardening your HTTP headers meant I was able to increase my ranking to acceptable level.

My site is running on an Apache server on an Ubuntu virtual machine on Digital Ocean. If you’ve got a similar set-up, this might be useful…

I ssh’d into my server and went to this folder in the Apache directory

cd /etc/apache2/sites-available

There’s a file called default-ssl.conf that I need to edit (my site is being served up over HTTPS; if your site isn’t, you should edit 000-default.conf instead). I type:

nano default-ssl.conf

Depending on your permissions, you might need to type:

sudo nano default-ssl.conf

Now I’m inside nano. It’s like any other text editor you might be used to using, if you imagined what it would be like to remove all the useful features from it.

Within the <Directory /var/www/> block, I add a few new lines:

<IfModule mod_headers.c>
  Header always set X-Xss-Protection "1; mode=block"
  Header always set X-Frame-Options "SAMEORIGIN"
  Header always set X-Content-Type-Options "nosniff"
</IfModule>

Those are all no-brainers:

  • Enable protection against cross-site-scripting.
  • Don’t allow your site to be put inside a frame.
  • Don’t allow anyone to change the content-type headers of your files after they’ve been sent from the server.

If you’re serving your site over HTTPS, and you’re confident that you don’t have any mixed content (a mixture of HTTPS and HTTP), you can add this line as well:

Header always set Content-Security-Policy "default-src https: data: 'unsafe-inline' 'unsafe-eval'"

To really up your paranoia (and let’s face it, that’s what security is all about; justified paranoia), you can throw this in too:

Header unset Server
Header unset X-Powered-By

That means that your server will no longer broadcast its intimate details. Of course, I’ve completely reversed that benefit by revealing to you in this blog post that my site is running on Apache on Ubuntu.

I’ll tell you something else too: it’s powered by PHP. There’s some editing I did there too. But before I get to that, let’s just finish up that .conf file…

Hit ctrl and o, then press enter. That writes out the file you’ve edited. Now you can leave nano: press ctrl and x.

You’ll need to restart Apache for those changes to take effect. Type:

service apache2 restart

Or, if permission is denied:

sudo service apache2 restart

Now, about that PHP thing. Head over to a different directory:

cd /etc/php5/fpm

Time to edit the php.ini file. Type:

nano php.ini

Or, if you need more permissions:

sudo nano php.ini

It’s a long file, but you’re really only interested in one line. A shortcut to finding that line is to hit ctrl and w (for “where is?”), type expose, and hit enter. That will take you to the right paragraph. If you see a line that says:

expose_php = On

Change it to:

expose_php= Off

Save the file (ctrl and o, enter) then exit nano (ctrl and x).

Restart Apache:

service apache2 restart

Again, you might need to preface that with sudo.

Alright, head on back to securityheaders.io and see how your site is doing now. You should be seeing a much better score.

There’s one more thing I should be doing that’s preventing me from getting a perfect score. That’s Public Key Pinning. It sounds a bit too scary for a mere mortal like me to attempt. Or rather, the consequences of getting it wrong (which I probably would), sound too scary.

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

securityheaders.io

A quick way of testing for some fairly easy to fix security leakage from your server’s headers.

I say easy to fix, but I find the fix for public key-pins pant-shittingly intimidating.

Saturday, December 24th, 2011

REDbot: <>

Oh, this is very handy indeed: a quick lint tool for HTTP so you can see what kind of headers are being sent. There’s a bookmarklet in the footer too.

Wednesday, July 25th, 2007

Thirteen Simple Rules for Speeding Up Your Web Site

The justification behind YSlow. If you've heard Nate Koechley speak, some of this will be familiar to you. It's all solid advice as far as I can tell.