Tags: i

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Monday, December 9th, 2019

It’s Time to Get Personal ◆ 24 ways

When people ask where to find you on the web, what do you tell them? Your personal website can be your home on the web. Or, if you don’t like to share your personal life in public, it can be more like your office. As with your home or your office, you can make it work for your own needs. Do you need a place that’s great for socialising, or somewhere to present your work? Without the constraints of somebody else’s platform, you get to choose what works for you.

A terrific piece from Laura enumerating the many ways that having your own website can empower you.

Have you already got your own website already? Fabulous! Is there anything you can do to make it easier for those who don’t have their own sites yet? Could you help a person move their site away from a big platform? Could you write a tutorial or script that provides guidance and reassurance?

Level of Effort | Brad Frost

Brad gets ranty …with good reason.

Checked in at Plough & Stars. Sunday night session 🎻🎵 map

Checked in at Plough & Stars. Sunday night session 🎻🎵

Sunday, December 8th, 2019

On this day

I’m in San Francisco to speak at An Event Apart, which kicks off tomorrow. But I arrived a few days early so that I could attend Indie Web Camp SF.

Yesterday was the discussion day. Most of the attendees were seasoned indie web campers, so quite a few of the discussions went deep on some of the building blocks. It was a good opportunity to step back and reappraise technology decisions.

Today is the day for making, tinkering, fiddling, and hacking. I had a few different ideas of what to do, mostly around showing additional context on my blog posts. I could, for instance, show related posts—other blog posts (or links) that have similar tags attached to them.

But I decided that a nice straightforward addition would be to show a kind of “on this day” context. After all, I’ve been writing blog posts here for eighteen years now; chances are that if I write a blog post on any given day, there will be something in the archives from that same day in previous years.

So that’s what I’ve done. I’ll be demoing it shortly here at Indie Web Camp, but you can see it in action now. If you look at the page for this blog post, you should see a section at the end with the heading “Previously on this day”. There you’ll see links to other posts I’ve written on December 8th in years gone by.

It’s quite a mixed bag. There’s a post about when I used to have a webcam from sixteen years ago. There’s a report from the Flash On The Beach conference from thirteen years ago (I wrote that post while I was in Berlin). And five years ago, I was writing about markup patterns for web components.

I don’t know if anyone other than me will find this feature interesting (but as it’s my website, I don’t really care). Personally, I find it fascinating to see how my writing has changed, both in terms of subject matter and tone.

Needless to say, the further back in time you go, the more chance there is that the links in my blog posts will no longer work. That’s a real shame. But then it’s a pleasant surprise when I find something that I linked to that is still online after all this time. And I can take comfort from the fact that if anyone has ever linked to anything I’ve written on my website, then those links still work.

2019 Firefox Flashback

Here’s an end-of-year roundup of all the data that Mozilla have gathered through their Firefox browser—very impressive!

Replying to

One of my favourite quotes in all of my talks was from this fantastic piece by the brilliant Ida Rhodes:

“The Human Computer’s Dreams Of The Future”

https://adactio.s3.amazonaws.com/pdf/IdaRhodes-TheHumanComputersDreamOfTheFuture.pdf

Replying to

Glad you liked it!

Saturday, December 7th, 2019

There’s a lot of love for @eleven_ty at Indie Web Camp San Francisco.

It feels like @ZachLeat is here in spirit.

Friday, December 6th, 2019

Going to San Francisco. brb

Thursday, December 5th, 2019

Left Homebrew Website Club Brighton a bit early to get to @TheSkiff for @AsyncJS to hear @DvBerzon talk about the results from his fascinating howreadable.com project.

I <3 the cascade! | Go Make Things

Chris makes the valid observation that JavaScript programmers who bemoan the “global scope” of CSS are handily forgetting that JavaScript also has global scope by default.

JS is also global by default. We use IIFEs and wrapper functions to add scope.

And for all this talk about CSS being global, you can actually scope styles when you need to. It’s more-or-less the same way you do it in JavaScript.

Reading The Canopy Of Time by Brian Aldiss.

Wednesday, December 4th, 2019

Checked in at Jolly Brewer. Tunes! — with Jessica map

Checked in at Jolly Brewer. Tunes! — with Jessica

I feel very lucky to have known @JamesWillWeb—a huge inspiration to me and many others.

I will miss him terribly.

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019

Replying to

💔

Conference talks…

Slides & videos: https://speaking.adactio.com/

Recently:

Upcoming:

Motion Paths - Past, Present and Future | Codrops

This is superbly in-depth and easy-to-follow article from Cassie—everything you need to know about motion paths in SVG and CSS! It’s worth reading just for the wonderful examples.

Music and Web Design | Brad Frost

I feel my trajectory as a musician maps to the trajectory of the web industry. The web is still young. We’re all still figuring stuff out and we’re all eager to get better. In our eagerness to get better, we’re reaching for more complexity. More complex abstractions, build processes, and tools. Because who wants to be bored playing in 4/4 when you can be playing in 7/16?

I hope we in the web field will arrive at the same realization that I did as a musician: complexity is not synonymous with quality.

Can I get an “Amen!”?

Monday, December 2nd, 2019

Design Questions Library | d.school public library

This site is not meant to be exhaustive, but rather a useful guide—our FAQ for design understanding. We hope it will inspire discussion, some questioning, a little soul searching, and ideally, a bit of intellectual support for your everyday endeavors.

The Design Questions Library goes nicely with the Library of Ambiguity.