Tags: ie

2065

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Wednesday, September 18th, 2019

Keeping it simple with CSS that scales - Andy Bell

The transcript of Andy’s talk from this year’s State Of The Browser conference.

I don’t think using scale as an excuse for over-engineering stuff—especially CSS—is acceptable, even for huge teams that work on huge products.

A love letter to my website - DESK Magazine

We choose whether our work stays alive on the internet. As long as we keep our hosting active, our site remains online. Compare that to social media platforms that go public one day and bankrupt the next, shutting down their app and your content along with it.

Your content is yours.

But the real truth is that as long as we’re putting our work in someone else’s hands, we forfeit our ownership over it. When we create our own website, we own it – at least to the extent that the internet, beautiful in its amorphous existence, can be owned.

The Appification of Everything & Why it Needs to End

When your only tool seems like a smartphone, everything looks like an app.

Amber writes on Ev’s blog about products that deliberately choose to be dependent on smartphone connectivity:

We read service outage stories like these seemingly every week, and have become numb to the fundamental reality: The idea of placing the safety of yourself, your child, or another loved one in the hands of an app dependent on a server you cannot touch, control, or know the status of, is utterly unacceptable.

Tuesday, September 17th, 2019

NoJS Side-by-Side

Drag this to your browser’s bookmark bar now!

Such a useful quick check for resilience—this bookmarklet shows you a side-by-side comparison of a site with JavaScript enabled and disabled.

Monday, September 16th, 2019

I’m Taking Ownership of My Tweets—zachleat.com

I fully expect my personal website to outlive Twitter and as such have decided to take full ownership of the content I’ve posted there. In true IndieWeb fashion, I’m taking ownership of my data.

Wednesday, September 11th, 2019

The Ugly Truth about Design Systems

The video of a talk in which Mark discusses pace layers, dogs, and design systems. He concludes:

  1. Current design systems thinking limits free, playful expression.
  2. Design systems uncover organisational disfunction.
  3. Continual design improvement and delivery is a lie.
  4. Component-focussed design is siloed thinking.

It’s true many design systems are the blueprints for manufacturing and large scale application. But in almost every instance I can think of, once you move from design to manufacturing the horse has bolted. It’s very difficult to move back into design because the results of the system are in the wild. The more strict the system, the less able you are to change it. That’s why broad principles, just enough governance, and directional examples are far superior to locked-down cookie cutters.

Tuesday, September 10th, 2019

Request mapping

The Request Map Generator is a terrific tool. It’s made by Simon Hearne and uses the WebPageTest API.

You pop in a URL, it fetches the page and maps out all the subsequent requests in a nifty interactive diagram of circles, showing how many requests third-party scripts are themselves generating. I’ve found it to be a very effective way of showing the impact of third-party scripts to people who aren’t interested in looking at waterfall diagrams.

I was wondering… Wouldn’t it be great if this were built into browsers?

We already have a “Network” tab in our developer tools. The purpose of this tab is to show requests coming in. The browser already has all the information it needs to make a diagram of requests in the same that the request map generator does.

In Firefox, there’s a little clock icon in the bottom left corner of the “Network” tab. Clicking that shows a pie-chart view of requests. That’s useful, but I’d love it if there were the option to also see the connected circles that the request map generator shows.

Just a thought.

Simplicity (II)

When you ever had to fix just a few lines of CSS and it took two hours to get an ancient version of Gulp up and running, you know what I’m talking about.

I feel seen.

When everything works, it feels like magic. When something breaks, it’s hell.

I concur with Bastian’s advice:

I have a simple rule of thumb when it comes to programming:

less code === less potential issues

And this observation rings very true:

This dependency hell is also the reason why old projects are almost like sealed capsules. You can hardly let a project lie around for more than a year, because afterwards it’s probably broken.

Thursday, September 5th, 2019

Why I Have a Website and You Should Too · Jamie Tanna | Software (Quality) Engineer

I know a number of people who blog as a way to express themselves, for expression’s sake, rather than for anyone else wanting to read it. It’s a great way to have a place to “scream into the void” and share your thoughts.

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019

Today’s Firefox Blocks Third-Party Tracking Cookies and Cryptomining by Default - The Mozilla Blog

If you haven’t done so already, you should really switch to Firefox.

Then encourage your friends and family to switch to Firefox too.

Reasons to be Cheerful

The new editorial project from David Byrne, as outlined in his recent Long Now talk.

Through stories of hope, rooted in evidence, Reasons to be Cheerful aims to inspire us all to be curious about how the world can be better, and to ask ourselves how we can be part of that change.

Sunday, September 1st, 2019

Why These Social Networks Failed So Badly

Ignore the clickbaity headline and have a read of Whitney Kimball’s obituaries of Friendster, MySpace, Bebo, OpenSocial, ConnectU, Tribe.net, Path, Yik Yak, Ello, Orkut, Google+, and Vine.

I’m sure your content on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram is perfectly safe.

Bandstands: The industry built on Victorian social engineering - BBC News

As a resident of Brighton—home to the most beautiful of bandstands—this bit of background to their history is fascinating.

Thursday, August 29th, 2019

comment parade

A way for you to comment (anonymously, if you wish) on any post that accepts webmentions. So you can use this to respond to posts on adactio.com if you want.

Saturday, August 24th, 2019

Consume less, create more

Editing is hard because you realize how bad you are. But editing is easy because we’re all better at criticizing than we are at creating.

Relatable:

My essay was garbage. But it was my garbage.

This essay is most definitely not garbage. I like it very much.

Friday, August 23rd, 2019

Intentional and Emergent Design Systems | Jordan Moore

This is a really interesting distinction:

An intentional design system. The flavour and framework may vary, but the approach generally consists of: design system first → design/build solutions.

An emergent design system. This approach is much closer to the user needs end of the scale by beginning with creative solutions before deriving patterns and systems (i.e the system emerges from real, coded scenarios).

It’s certainly true that intentional design systems will invariably bake in a number of (unproven?) assumptions.

Thursday, August 22nd, 2019

Jeremy Keith - Building The Web - View Source 2019 - YouTube

I had a chat with Vitaly for half an hour about all things webby. It was fun!

Why We All Need a Personal Website – Plus Practical Tips for How to Build One - Adobe 99U

The best time to make a personal website is 20 years ago. The second best time to make a personal website is now.

Chris offers some illustrated advice:

  • Define the purpose of your site
  • Organize your content
  • Look for inspiration
  • Own your own domain name
  • Build your website

Wednesday, August 21st, 2019

Accessibility and web performance are not features, they’re the baseline | CSS-Tricks

Performance and accessibility aren’t features that can linger at the bottom of a Jira board to be considered later when it’s convenient.

Instead we must start to see inaccessible and slow websites for what they are: a form of cruelty. And if we want to build a web that is truly a World Wide Web, a place for all and everyone, a web that is accessible and fast for as many people as possible, and one that will outlive us all, then first we must make our websites something else altogether; we must make them kind.