Tags: inputs



Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

Accessible custom styled form elements - Rian Rietveld

An excellent level-headed evaluation of styling and scripting form controls, weighing up the benefits and trade-offs. The more tightly you control the appearance, the less you get to benefit from the functionality (and accessibility) that the browser gives you for free …meaning you’ve now to got to work harder to replace it.

HTML elements like check buttons, radio buttons or select options can be hard to style with CSS in a custom design. There are many workarounds for this, but are they accessible?

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

Form Validation with Web Audio | CSS-Tricks

An interesting idea from Ruth—using subtle sounds to augment inline form validation.

There aren’t any extremely established best practices for this stuff. The best we can do is make tasteful choices and do user research. Which is to say, the examples in this post are ideas, not gospel.

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

Implementing a slider well

A look at the feedback needed for a slider control that feels “right”.

You can get most of the behavioural (though not styling) suggestions in HTML by doing this:

  <input type="range" min="0" max="100" value="50"
  <output name="amount">50</output>

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

Improve Your Billing Form’s UX In One Day – Smashing Magazine

A few straightforward steps for improving the usability of credit card forms. The later steps involve JavaScript but the first step uses nothing more than straight-up HTML.

WTF, forms?

Here’s a CSS file that will give you a bit more control over styling some form elements. The thinking behind the CSS for each element is explained nice and clearly.

Saturday, November 2nd, 2013

Responsive design, screens, and shearing layers — Unstoppable Robot Ninja

A wonderful piece by Ethan taking issue what the criticism that responsive design is over-reliant on screen size. Instead, he says, it begins with screen size, but there’s no limit to where we can go from there.

Responsive design might begin with the screen, but it doesn’t end there.