Tags: interface

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sparkline

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

Removing the White Bars in Safari on iPhone X

You could add a bunch of proprietary CSS that Apple just pulled out of their ass.

Or you could make sure to set a background colour on your body element.

I recommend the latter. Because reasons.

Fix Twitter by Jonathan Suh

Make Twitter Great Again:

Fix Twitter is a browser extension to always show “replying to” in replies and threads along with an option to restore the old-school @-mentions.

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

Sonic sparklines

I’ve seen some lovely examples of the Web Audio API recently.

At the Material conference, Halldór Eldjárn demoed his Poco Apollo project. It generates music on the fly in the browser to match a random image from NASA’s Apollo archive on Flickr. Brian Eno, eat your heart out!

At Codebar Brighton a little while back, local developer Luke Twyman demoed some of his audio-visual work, including the gorgeous Solarbeat—an audio orrery.

The latest issue of the Clearleft newsletter has some links on sound design in interfaces:

I saw Ruth give a fantastic talk on the Web Audio API at CSS Day this year. It had just the right mixture of code and inspiration. I decided there and then that I’d have to find some opportunity to play around with web audio.

As ever, my own website is the perfect playground. I added an audio Easter egg to adactio.com a while back, and so far, no one has noticed. That’s good. It’s a very, very silly use of sound.

In her talk, Ruth emphasised that the Web Audio API is basically just about dealing with numbers. Lots of the examples of nice usage are the audio equivalent of data visualisation. Data sonification, if you will.

I’ve got little bits of dataviz on my website: sparklines. Each one is a self-contained SVG file. I added a script element to the SVG with a little bit of JavaScript that converts numbers into sound (I kind of wish that the script were scoped to the containing SVG but that’s not the way JavaScript in SVG works—it’s no different to putting a script element directly in the body). Clicking on the sparkline triggers the sound-playing function.

It sounds terrible. It’s like a theremin with hiccups.

Still, I kind of like it. I mean, I wish it sounded nicer (and I’m open to suggestions on how to achieve that—feel free to fork the code), but there’s something endearing about hearing a month’s worth of activity turned into a wobbling wave of sound. And it’s kind of fun to hear how a particular tag is used more frequently over time.

Anyway, it’s just a silly little thing, but anywhere you spot a sparkline on my site, you can tap it to hear it translated into sound.

Monday, September 11th, 2017

Why strong sound design is critical to successful products - O’Reilly Media

From Designing Products with Sound by Amber Case and Aaron Day:

Sound eases cognitive burdens.

Sound is also a powerful brand differentiator.

Sound is emotional.

Finally, sound impacts productivity.

But also:

Not every product needs sound design.

Friday, September 8th, 2017

UI Sounds: From Zero To Hero | Icons8 Blog

Following on from Ruth’s piece, here are some more thoughts on sound in UI from Roman Zimarev, the creator of icon sounds.

He makes a distinction between notification sounds and interaction sounds, as well as talking about sound identity in branding.

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

Write.as — Spread your ideas

This looks like a really nice writing interface. It currently exports to Medium, Tumblr, and Twitter …but it would be really nice if it could post to a micropub endpoint.

Form Validation with Web Audio | CSS-Tricks

An interesting idea from Ruth—using subtle sounds to augment inline form validation.

There aren’t any extremely established best practices for this stuff. The best we can do is make tasteful choices and do user research. Which is to say, the examples in this post are ideas, not gospel.

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

User Interfaces for Variable Fonts · An A List Apart Article

A good introduction to variable fonts, and an exploration of the possible interface elements we might use to choose our settings: toggles? knobs? sliders? control pads?

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017

Interface font family

Interface is a font for highly legible text on computer screens.

And it’s free!

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

What Would Augment Reality? (with images, tweets) · lukew · Storify

Luke has been asking people to imagine ways of augmenting the world. Spimes are back, baby!

Monday, July 31st, 2017

Tooltips & Toggletips

Another great deep dive by Heydon into a single interface pattern. This time it’s the tooltip, and its cousin, the toggletip.

There’s some great accessibility advice in here.

Sunday, July 23rd, 2017

What I’ve learned about motor impairment

James gives—if you’ll pardon the pun— hands-on advice on making sites that consider motor impairment:

  • Don’t assume keyboard access is all you need
    • Auto complete/Autofill
    • Show me my password
  • Allow for fine motor control issues
    • Don’t autoplay videos
    • Avoid hover-only controls
    • Infinite scrolling considerations
  • Be mindful of touch
    • Avoid small hit targets
    • Provide alternate controls for touch gestures

Far from being a niche concern, visitors with some form of motor impairment likely make up a significant percentage of your users. I would encourage you to test your website or application with your less dominant hand. Is it still easy to use?

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

Designing The Perfect Slider – Smashing Magazine

If you thought Vitaly’s roundup of date pickers was in-depth, wait ‘till you get a load of this exhaustive examination of slider controls.

It pairs nicely with this link.

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

URLs are UI - Scott Hanselman

So many folks spend time on their CSS and their UX/UI but still come up with URLs that are at best, comically long, and at worst, user hostile.

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

Designing The Perfect Date And Time Picker – Smashing Magazine

Vitaly’s been bitten with date-picker fever. Here’s his deep, deep, deep dive into one interface element.

Tuesday, July 4th, 2017

Perch UI Pattern Library | Perch UI Pattern Library

A nice little pattern library from Rachel and Drew for the Perch admin interface. Within folders, they’re using Brad’s atomic design nomenclature, and the whole thing is managed with Fractal.

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

Fidget Spinners — Real Life

A look at our relationship with waiting, and how that is manifested in the loading icons in our interfaces.

For me, in my moments of boredom, as I turn to my phone and refresh my social media feed, I imagine that what’s on the other side of the buffering icon might be the content that will rid me of boredom and produce a satisfying social connection. The buffering icon here represents my hopes for the many ways that my social media feeds can satisfy my longings at any given moment. They rarely do, though I believe that we are half in love with the buffering icon here because it represents the promise of intimacy or excitement across the distances that separate us.

Sunday, July 2nd, 2017

Sticky headers

A three-part series by Remy looking at one interface pattern (a sticky header) and how his code evolved and changed:

  1. Sticky headers
  2. Smooth scroll & sticky navigation
  3. CSS sticky nav & smooth scroll

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

Implementing a slider well

A look at the feedback needed for a slider control that feels “right”.

You can get most of the behavioural (though not styling) suggestions in HTML by doing this:

<form>
  <input type="range" min="0" max="100" value="50"
   onchange="amount.value=this.value"
   onmousemove="amount.value=this.value">
  <output name="amount">50</output>
</form>

Out of the (Drop)Shadows | Scott Jensen Design

Can an opinionated flat design still have depth and truly be free of drop shadows?

Scott proposes a technique that mimics atmospheric perspective—y’know, when things in the distance look hazier than things in the foreground.

The fact is, we are surrounded by a world that is full of depth, and very little of it is defined by shadow. If we are going to replace drop shadows in our visual UI metaphors, we should look at other options that create depth in the world around us.