Tags: ipad

22

sparkline

Friday, June 12th, 2015

100 words 082

Apple launched the iPad five years ago. A few months after its release, I bought one of those first-generation iPads. I used it for a while before concluding that, much as I had suspected, it wasn’t the right device for me. But it was the perfect device for my mother. So I gave the iPad to my mother.

Sure enough, it worked out great for her. But now it’s getting quite long in the tooth. So now I’ve given her a new iPad for her birthday; one that’s lighter, faster, and—crucially—comes with a camera. It’s a Facetime device.

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Unmoored

James re-imagines the Barbican as an airship drifting free of central London.

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

In Flux | Trent Walton

Trent offers some excellent advice for dealing with the effects of the iPad’s retina display on your websites. That advice is: don’t panic.

Friday, April 20th, 2012

From Print to iPad: Designing a Reading Experience

Harry’s 15 minute case-study presentation at UX London was excellent. He says the lesson is that we shouldn’t be afraid to make mistakes, but there’s another lesson here too: testing with users will save your ass.

Thursday, October 27th, 2011

Newsstand Is Promising, Yay! But Enough with Issue-Based Publishing (Global Moxie)

Josh nails it: publishers need to stop thinking in terms of issues:

Publishers and designers have to start thinking about content at a more atomic level, not in aggregated issues. That’s how we already understand news as consumers, and we have to start thinking that way as publishers, too. This is why Flipboard, Instapaper, and other aggregators are so interesting: they give you one container for the whole universe of content, unbound to any one publisher.

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

OLO

This is a thoroughly enjoyable, frustratingly addictive two-player game for the iPad.

Oh, and it just happens to be made with HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Friday, June 10th, 2011

McSweeney’s Internet Tendency: TripAdvisor.com Reviews for the Overlook Hotel.

I look forward to seeing Eyes Wide Shut as a series of Foursquare check-ins.

Friday, April 29th, 2011

Push Pop Press: Al Gore’s Our Choice

This looks like a beautiful way to present information, although it seems a real shame that the information is locked to just one class of device.

Monday, April 4th, 2011

Orientation and scale

Paul Irish, Divya Manian and Shi Chuan launched Mobile Boilerplate recently—a mobile companion site to HTML5 Boilerplate.

There’s some good stuff in there but I was a little surprised to see that the meta viewport element included values for minimum-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0, user-scalable=no:

Setting user-scalable=no is pretty much the same as setting minimum-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0. In any case, I’m not keen on it. Like Roger, I don’t think we should take away the user’s right to pinch and zoom to make content larger. That’s why my usual viewport declaration is:

Yes, I know that most native apps don’t allow you to zoom but I see no reason to replicate that failing on the web.

But there’s a problem. Allowing users to scale content for comfort would be fine if it weren’t for a bug in Mobile Safari:

When the meta viewport tag is set to content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1", or any value that allows user-scaling, changing the device to landscape orientation causes the page to scale larger than 1.0. As a result, a portion of the page is cropped off the right, and the user must double-tap (sometimes more than once) to get the page to zoom properly into view.

This is really annoying so Shi Chuan set about fixing the problem.

His initial solution was to keep minimum-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0 in the meta viewport element but then to change it using JavaScript once the user initiates a gesture (the gesturestart event is triggered as soon as two fingers are on the screen). At the point, the content attribute of the meta viewport element gets updated to read minimum-scale=0.25, maximum-scale=1.6, the default values:

var metas = document.getElementsByTagName('meta');
var i;
if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i)) {
  document.addEventListener("gesturestart", gestureStart, false);
  function gestureStart() {
    for (i=0; i<metas.length; i++) {
      if (metas[i].name == "viewport") {
        metas[i].content = "width=device-width, minimum-scale=0.25, maximum-scale=1.6";
      }
    }
  }
}

That works nicely but I wasn’t too keen on the dependency between the markup and the script. If, for whatever reason, the script doesn’t get executed, users are stuck with an unzoomable page.

I suggested that the script should also set the initial value to minimum-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0:

var metas = document.getElementsByTagName('meta');
var i;
if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i)) {
  for (i=0; i<metas.length; i++) {
    if (metas[i].name == "viewport") {
      metas[i].content = "width=device-width, minimum-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0";
    }
  }
  document.addEventListener("gesturestart", gestureStart, false);
}
function gestureStart() {
  for (i=0; i<metas.length; i++) {
    if (metas[i].name == "viewport") {
      metas[i].content = "width=device-width, minimum-scale=0.25, maximum-scale=1.6";
    }
  }
}

Now the markup still contains the robust accessible default:

…while the script takes care of initially setting the scale values and also updating them when a gesture is detected. Here’s what’s happening:

  1. By default, the page is scaleable because the initial meta viewport declaration doesn’t set a minimum-scale or maximum-scale.
  2. Once the script loads, the page is no longer scalable because both minimum-scale and maximum-scale have been set to 1.0. If the device is switched from portrait to landscape, the resizing bug won’t be triggered because scaling is disabled.
  3. When the gesturestart event is detected—indicating that the user might be trying to scale the page—the minimum-scale and maximum-scale values are updated to allow scaling. At this point, if the device is switched from portrait to landscape, the resizing bug will occur because the page is now scaleable.

Jason Weaver points out that you should probably detect for iPad too. That’s a pretty straightforward update:

if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i) || navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i))

Mathias Bynens updated the code to use querySelectorAll which is supported in Mobile Safari. Here’s the code I’m currently using:

if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i) || navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i)) {
  var viewportmeta = document.querySelector('meta[name="viewport"]');
  if (viewportmeta) {
    viewportmeta.content = 'width=device-width, minimum-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0';
    document.body.addEventListener('gesturestart', function() {
      viewportmeta.content = 'width=device-width, minimum-scale=0.25, maximum-scale=1.6';
    }, false);
  }
}

You can try it out on Huffduffer, Salter Cane, Principia Gastronomica and right here on Adactio.

Right now there’s still a little sluggishness between the initial pinch-zoom gesture and the scaling; the scale values (0.25 - 1.6) don’t seem to take effect immediately. A second pinch-zoom gesture is often required. If you have any ideas for improving the event capturing and propagation, dive in there.

Update: the bug has been fixed in iOS 6.

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

iPad: The Microwave Oven of Computing | Techinch

Y’know, I think this comparison actually makes a lot of sense.

Monday, December 20th, 2010

A Starry Night on Vimeo

A very cute Christmas message from Torchbox.

A Starry Night

Monday, November 29th, 2010

iOS Fonts

A handy list of installed fonts on the iPhone and iPad.

Sunday, October 24th, 2010

Super-Toys Last All Summer Long

When I was in Boston for An Event Apart back in May, I bought an .

That makes it sound like a very casual act. Back then, iPads were in very short supply. When I asked an employee at the Apple Store in Boston if they had any iPads in stock, he didn’t answer Hmm… let me check, or Not at the moment. He answered Oh, God no!

Fortunately, Malarkey was far more persistent than I and managed, through means fair or foul, to track down the only two iPads for sale in all of Beantown.

I used the device for two months and then, as predicted, I gave it to my mother. It was definitely the right decision. She loves it. She’s using it all the time, surfing the web wherever she pleases.

I liked using the iPad, but I didn’t love it. Once the novelty wore off, I found I had few good reasons to use it rather than use my Macbook.

Some observations from a Summer spent in the company of the iPad…

The iPad is almost exactly the wrong weight. It’s just that little bit too heavy to comfortably hold in one hand. It’s no coincidence that all of iPad demonstrations show it resting on a raised leg. I found that if I was using the iPad for any length of time, I would adopt a more and more relaxed, nay… slouchy position. Before I knew it, I was supine on the sofa, one leg raised with the iPad resting against it, like a Roman emperor waiting to be fed individually-peeled grapes.

The iPad is a great device for reading. I rediscovered the power of RSS. The iPad is also a great device for browsing the web. The problem is, I don’t really browse the web that much. Instead, I browse, I bookmark, I quote, I huffduff, I copy, I paste, I tweet, I share. Using an iPad made me realise that the web is very much a read/write medium for me. While it’s possible to do all those things on the iPad, it isn’t easy.

The tell-tale moment came when I was reading something on the iPad—supine on the sofa, of course—that I wanted to post to Delicious. Rather than fill in a form using the iPad’s on-screen keyboard, I found myself putting the iPad down and reaching for my Macbook just to accomplish that one little task. That’s when I knew it wasn’t the ideal device for me.

Don’t get me wrong: I’m not joining in the chorus of those silly enough to say that the iPad can’t be used for creating, editing and updating. That conclusion would be far too absolute and Boolean. But I think the iPad favours consumption more than creation. And that’s okay. That still makes it a great device for many people—such as my mother.

There’s one big fly in the ointment of the iPad as a device for non-geeks—such as my mother—and that’s the out-of-the-box experience. John Gruber pointed this out in his review of the iPad:

One thing that is very iPhone-like about iPad is that when you first take it out of the box, it wants to be plugged into your Mac or PC via USB and sync with iTunes. … It creates an impression that the iPad does not stand on its own. It’s a child that still needs a parent. But it’s not a young child. It’s more like a teenager. It’s close. So close that it feels like it ought to be able to stand on its own.

My mother has an old G3 Ruby iMac which doesn’t have USB 2, so I had to set up the iPad on my machine before giving it to her. It’s such a shame that this step is even necessary. I love the idea of a portable touchscreen device that you can simply turn on for the first time, connect to a WiFi network, and start surfing the web.

Perhaps later versions of the iPad will support account synching via . Perhaps later versions of the iPad will support multiple accounts, which would make it a great family household device. Perhaps later versions of the iPad will have a front-facing camera and support FaceTime. Perhaps later versions of the iPad will be slimmer and lighter.

Perhaps I will get a later version of the iPad.

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

Let's start a new life with iDish. - しーなねこの記録

By far the best use of an iPad I've seen.

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

Non Hover | Trent Walton

A timely reminder: don't hide information behind mouseover events.

Saturday, June 26th, 2010

What Apple needs to do now « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird

Adam Greenfield is spot-on here, dismantling Apple's "imitate real world objects" design guideline for iPhone and iPad apps.

Tuesday, June 1st, 2010

Four Hundred & Twenty-Nine Pounds — Paul Robert Lloyd

Paul doesn't need an iPad. Neither do I. Neither do you. Paul is spending his money elsewhere.

Sunday, May 2nd, 2010

MiniApps - HTML5 apps for iPhone, iPad, Android & other mobile platforms

A nice collection of free apps for your mobile device. No app store required, thanks to offline storage.

Friday, April 30th, 2010

The real reason why Steve Jobs hates Flash - Charlie's Diary

Charles Stross peers into his dilithium crystal ball and tells tales of the future as decided by Apple.

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

QuirksBlog: A pixel is not a pixel is not a pixel

A clear explanation of device-width from PPK.