Tags: life

63

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Friday, July 19th, 2019

Simon Collison | Timeline

I’ve shaped this timeline over five months. It might look simple, but it most definitely was not. I liken it to chipping away at a block of marble, or the slow process of evolving a painting, or constructing a poem; endless edits, questions, doubling back, doubts. It was so good to have something meaty to get stuck into, but sometimes it was awful, and many times I considered throwing it away. Overall it was challenging, fun, and worth the effort.

Simon describes the process of curating the lovely timeline on his personal homepage.

My timeline is just like me, and just like my life: unfinished, and far from perfect.

Monday, June 24th, 2019

Frank Chimero on causing ‘good trouble’ and re-imagining the status quo to combat achievement culture | Creative Boom

It’s really easy to think that not working full bore is somehow failing your teammates or that withholding effort is poor work ethic and moral weakness. That thought is worth interrogating, though, and it all seems kind of ridiculous once you get it out in the open. There should be no guilt for refusing to work hysterically.

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

I commissioned an oil painting of Barbra Streisand’s cloned dogs

There’s something deliciously appropriate about using a painting cloning service to clone a photograph of some cloned dogs.

“Did you just order an oil painting of Barbra Streisand’s dogs?” is the most Simon and Natalie thing ever.

Although this comes close:

I took it to the framing store and asked if they could do something with “an air of existential dread”… and they nailed it too!

Sunday, February 17th, 2019

Is the universe pro-life? The Fermi paradox can help explain — Quartz

Living things are just a better way for nature to dissipate energy and increase the universe’s entropy.

No anthropocentric exceptionalism here; just the laws of thermodynamics.

According to the inevitable life theory, biological systems spontaneously emerge because they more efficiently disperse, or “dissipate” energy, thereby increasing the entropy of the surroundings. In other words, life is thermodynamically favorable.

As a consequence of this fact, something that seems almost magical happens, but there is nothing supernatural about it. When an inanimate system of particles, like a group of atoms, is bombarded with flowing energy (such as concentrated currents of electricity or heat), that system will often self-organize into a more complex configuration—specifically an arrangement that allows the system to more efficiently dissipate the incoming energy, converting it into entropy.

Tuesday, January 1st, 2019

Welcome to the Silicon Seaside - PCMag UK

A profile of Brighton, featuring Clearleft’s own Chris How.

Monday, December 31st, 2018

How I write conference talks. — Ethan Marcotte

I can relate to Ethan’s 16-step process for writing conference talks.

Step 14 is the most important.

Friday, October 26th, 2018

Silicon Valley by the Sea: Is Brighton Really a UK Startup Hub?

Terrible title; nice article. Rich speaks his brains about Clearleft and what we like about being in Brighton.

Wednesday, June 27th, 2018

BREAKING: Complex Organic Molecules Discovered on Enceladus For The First Time

I know I should remain calm and sceptical about announcements like this, but …SQUEEEE!

Wednesday, January 3rd, 2018

How DIY communities are pushing the frontiers of science | Labs | eLife

A report on Science Hack Day Berlin (published on the excellent eLife website).

When I put together the first Science Hack Day back in 2010, I had no idea how amazingly far it would spread—all thanks to Ariel.

Monday, June 5th, 2017

eLife goes live

The World Wide Web was forged in the crucible of science. Tim Berners-Lee was working at CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research, a remarkable place where the pursuit of knowledge—rather than the pursuit of profit—is the driving force.

I often wonder whether the web as we know it—an open, decentralised system—could’ve been born anywhere else. These days it’s easy to focus on the success stories of the web in the worlds of commerce and social networking, but I still find there’s something that really “clicks” with the web and the science (Zooniverse being a classic example).

At Clearleft we’ve been lucky enough to work on science-driven projects like the Wellcome Library and the Wellcome Trust. It’s incredibly rewarding to work on projects where the bottom line is measured in knowledge-sharing rather than moolah. So when we were approached by eLife to help them with an upcoming redesign, we jumped at the chance.

We usually help organisations through our expertise in user-centred design, but in this case the design and UX were already in hand. The challenge was in the implementation. The team at eLife knew that they wanted a modular pattern library to keep their front-end components documented and easily reusable. Given Clearleft’s extensive experience with building pattern libraries, this was a match made in heaven (or whatever the scientific non-theistic equivalent of heaven is).

A group of us travelled up from Brighton to Cambridge to kick things off with a workshop. Before diving into code, it was important to set out the aims for the redesign, and figure out how a pattern library could best support those aims.

Right away, I was struck by the great working relationship between design and front-end development within eLife—there was a great collaborative spirit to the endeavour.

Some goals for the redesign soon emerged:

  • Promote the HTML reading experience as a 1st choice for readers.
  • Align the online experience with the eLife visual identity.

That led to some design principles:

  • Focus on content not site furniture.
  • Remove visual clutter and provide no more than the user needs at any stage of the experience.
  • Aid discovery of value added content beyond the manuscript.

Those design principles then informed the front-end development process. Together we came up with a priority of concerns:

  1. Access
  2. Maintainability
  3. Performance
  4. Taking advantage of browser capabilities
  5. Visual appeal

It’s interesting that maintainability was such a high priority that it superseded even performance, but we also proposed a hypothesis at the same time:

Maintainability doesn’t negatively impact performance.

The combination of the design principles and priorities led us to formulate approaches that could be used throughout the project:

  • Progressive enhancement.
  • Small-screen first responsive images.
  • Only add libraries as needed.

Then we dived into the tech stack: build tools, version control approaches, and naming methodologies. BEM was the winner there.

None of those decisions were set in stone, but they really helped to build a solid foundation for the work ahead. Graham camped out in Cambridge for a while, embedding himself in the team there as they began the process of identifying, naming, and building the components.

The work continued after Clearleft’s involvement wrapped up, and I’m happy to say that it all paid off. The new eLife site has just gone live. It’s looking—and performing—beautifully.

What a great combination: the best of the web and the best of science!

eLife is a non-profit organisation inspired by research funders and led by scientists. Our mission is to help scientists accelerate discovery by operating a platform for research communication that encourages and recognises the most responsible behaviours in science.

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

ongoing by Tim Bray · Geek Career Paths

Tim Bray lists the options available to a technically-minded person thinking about their career path …but doesn’t mention the option of working at an agency.

Some good long-zoom observations in here:

The bad news that it’s a lot of work. We’re a young pro­fes­sion and we’re still work­ing out our best prac­tices, so the ground keeps chang­ing un­der you; it doesn’t get eas­i­er as the decades go by.

The good news is that it doesn’t get hard­er ei­ther. Once you learn to stop ex­pect­ing your knowl­edge to stay fresh, the pace of in­no­va­tion doesn’t feel to me like it’s much faster (or slow­er) now than it was in 1987 or 1997 or 2007. More good news: The tech­nol­o­gy gets bet­ter. Se­ri­ous­ly, we are so much bet­ter at build­ing soft­ware now than we used to be in any of those oth­er years end­ing in 7.

Saturday, February 4th, 2017

The Computational Foundation of Life | Quanta Magazine

Philip Ball certainly has a way with words.

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Astronaut

This is beautifully intimate. Your role is that of an anthropologist in orbit around Earth observing the everyday moments on the planet below through uploaded videos that have never been viewed by another human.

Monday, November 21st, 2016

Is Dark Matter Hiding Aliens?

Here’s a fun cosmic hypothesis on the scale of an Olaf Stapeldon story. There are even implications for data storage:

By storing its essential data in photons, life could give itself a distributed backup system. And it could go further, manipulating new photons emitted by stars to dictate how they interact with matter. Fronts of electromagnetic radiation could be reaching across the cosmos to set in motion chains of interstellar or planetary chemistry with exquisite timing, exploiting wave interference and excitation energies in atoms and molecules.

Sunday, October 16th, 2016

The Service Worker Lifecycle  |  Web  |  Google Developers

Jake goes into the details of what exactly is happening when a service worker is installed or replaced.

This is easily the most complex part of working with service workers, and I think I’m beginning to wrap my head around it, but the good news is that, for the most part, you don’t really need to know the ins and outs of this to get started (and dev tools are now making it easier to nuke from orbit if this begins to bite).

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

The Service Worker Lifecycle

The life cycle of a Service Worker—with all its events and states—is the one bit that I’ve never paid that much attention to. My eyes just glaze over when it comes to installation, registration, and activation. But this post explains the whole process really clearly. Now it’s starting to make sense to me.

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

Network Effect

The latest piece from Jonathan Harris explores online life in all its mundanity, presenting it in an engaging way, all the while trying to make you feel bad for doing exactly what the site is encouraging you to do.

Friday, March 11th, 2016

THE WALK OF LIFE PROJECT

The thesis: any film is improved by playing Walk Of Life by Dire Straits over the ending.

The proof: this website.

(this is absorbing and brilliant)

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

Someone will read this

After Responsive Field Day I had the chance to spend some extra time in Portland. I was staying with one Andy, with occasional welcome opportunities to hang out with the other Andy.

Over an artisanal, hand-crafted, free-range lunch one day, I took a moment to thank Andy B. I thanked him for a link. Links are very much his stock-in-trade, but there was one in particular that he had shared which stuck in my soul.

It started when he offered a bribe for a good link:

Paul Thompson won the bounty:

The link was to a page on Tilde Town, one of the many old-school web rings set up in the spirit of Paul Ford’s Tilde Club. The owner of this page had taken it upon himself to perform a really interesting—and surprisingly moving—experiment:

  1. Find blog posts where people have written “no one will ever read this”, and
  2. Read them aloud.

I’ve written before about how powerful the sound of a human voice can be. There was something about hearing these posts—which were written with a resigned acceptance of indifference—being given the time and respect to be read aloud. I listened to every single one, sometimes bemused, sometimes horrified, always fascinated.

You should listen to all of them too. They deserve it.

One in particular haunted me. It was written in 2008. After listening to it, I had to know more. I felt creepy and voyeuristic, but I transcribed a sentence from the audio file and pasted it in to Google.

I found her blog on the old my-diary.org domain. She only wrote nine entries in total. Her last one was in November 2009.

That was six years ago. I wonder how things turned out for her. I wonder if life got better for her when she left her teenage years behind. I wonder if she ever found peace.

I hope she’s okay.

Friday, January 9th, 2015

The Real Roots of Midlife Crisis - The Atlantic

As someone entering their mid 40s, I find this research into “the U-curve” immensely reassuring.