Tags: maths

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sparkline

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

Metaballs

Metaballs, not to be confused with meatballs, are organic looking squishy gooey blobs.

Here’s the maths behind the metaballs (implemented in SVG).

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

How Not To Sort By Average Rating

I don’t understand the maths, but the logic is fascinating.

Friday, July 9th, 2010

aM laboratory

A beautiful piece of musical mathematical poetry.

Friday, April 3rd, 2009

NEW MATH by Craig Damrauer

Equations to live by.

Monday, February 9th, 2009

Quantum Random Bit Generator Service

There's no such thing as a good CAPTCHA but if there were, these would be ...Best. CAPTCHAs. Ever!

Friday, August 8th, 2008

Finding five numbers

I like Tumblr. I like Pownce. They both make it very quick and easy to post discrete quanta of information. I use Pownce for posting audio files and links to videos. I use Tumblr to post quotations. But both services suffer from the same problem: refindability.

Magnolia and Delicious encourage tagging. Those tags can then surface some pretty interesting aggregate behaviour but first and foremost, they’re useful for the individual doing the tagging. It’s pretty easy for me to track down something I bookmarked on Magnolia even if it was quite a while back. I don’t need to keep a list of all the tags I’ve ever used: I just need to search for a word that I think I might have used when I was tagging a bookmark. While it would be very difficult for me to try to second-guess how someone else might describe something, it’s usually pretty easy to put myself in the shoes of my past self.

As my store of data on Pownce and Tumblr increases, I’m starting to miss tagging (or any kind of search) more and more. Then again, I can understand why both services would resist that kind of scope creep. Both services rely on their simplicity. Adding another field to fill in could potentially be a road block between the user and the task they want to accomplish (although it doesn’t feel that way with Delicious or Magnolia). Update: it turns out that you can tag in Tumblr but it’s hidden behind the “advanced” link. Thanks to Keith Bell for pointing that out.

Here’s a case in point. Over time I’ve been posting MP3 files to Pownce of a series of radio programmes by Simon Singh, author of The Code Book — a superb piece of work. The audio from the radio programmes is available from the BBC website but only in Real Audio which, let’s face it, is complete pants. I originally got the MP3 files from Brian but after a catastrophic hard drive crash, I realised that it would be better to store them at an addressable URL. Besides, I wanted to geek out with my mathematically-minded friends. Pownce’s raison d’être is sharing stuff with friends so it seemed like the perfect home for the Singh files.

But without any kind of tagging or search, there’s no easy way for me or anyone else to revisit just those files at a later date. As a temporary patch, I’m listing the URLs for the Pownce posts that correspond to each episode. If you want to download the files, you’ll need to log in to Pownce.

  1. Five Numbers

    1. A Countdown to Zero
    2. Simple as Pi
    3. The Golden Ratio
    4. The Imaginary Number
    5. Infinity
  2. Another Five Numbers

    1. The Number Four
    2. The Number Seven
    3. The Largest Prime Number
    4. Kepler’s Conjecture
    5. Game Theory
  3. A Further Five Numbers

    1. 1 — The Most Popular Number!
    2. 2 — At the Double
    3. 6 Degrees of Separation
    4. 6.67 x 10-11 — The Number that Defines the Universe
    5. 1729 — The First Taxicab Number

Monday, July 28th, 2008

Fun (and Fraud Detection) with Benford’s Law | Data and the Web

Benford's law blows my mind. Be sure to watch the video. This is all related to network theory and power law distributions ...I'm just not sure how.

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

The Long Now Foundation - Essays

Richard Feynman and The Connection Machine.