Tags: mit

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Wednesday, May 15th, 2019

A report from the AMP Advisory Committee Meeting – Terence Eden’s Blog

I completely agree with every single one of Terence’s recommendations here. The difference is that, in my case, they’re just hot takes, whereas he has actually joined the AMP Advisory Committee, joined their meetings, and listened to the concerns of actual publishers.

He finds:

  • AMP isn’t loved by publishers
  • AMP is not accessible
  • No user research
  • AMP spreads fake news
  • Signed Exchanges are not the answer

There’s also a very worrying anti-competitive move by Google Search in only showing AMP results to users of Google Chrome.

I’ve been emailing with Paul from the AMP team and I’ve told him that I honestly think that AMP’s goal should be to make itself redundant …the opposite of the direction it’s going in.

As I said in the meeting - if it were up to me, I’d go “Well, AMP was an interesting experiment. Now it is time to shut it down and take the lessons learned back through a proper standards process.”

I suspect that is unlikely to happen. Google shows no sign of dropping AMP. Mind you, I thought that about Google+ and Inbox, so who knows!

Good point!

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

Limitation Breeds Creativity - Cassie Evans [Bytes Conf 2019] - YouTube

Cassie’s terrific talk from Bytes Conf, featuring some wild CSS experiments.

(Conference organisers—you want Cassie on your stage!)

Friday, March 15th, 2019

Friday, February 1st, 2019

Limiting JavaScript? - TimKadlec.com

Following on from that proposal for a browser feature that I linked to yesterday, Tim thinks through all the permutations and possibilities of user agents allowing users to throttle resources:

If a limit does get enforced (it’s important to remember this is still a big if right now), as long as it’s handled with care I can see it being an excellent thing for the web that prioritizes users, while still giving developers the ability to take control of the situation themselves.

Monday, January 7th, 2019

Resolution

The start of a new year is the traditional time for making resolutions. I’ve done it in the past. Now I’m not sure it’s such a good idea.

Think about it. It’s January. The middle of winter. It’s cold outside. The days are short. The only seasonal foods available are root vegetables and brassicas. Considering this lack of sunlight and fruit, it seems inadvisable to try to also deny yourself the intake of sugar, alcohol, meat, carbohydrates or gluten. You’re playing with a stacked deck. And then when inevitably, in the depths of winter, you cave in and pour yourself a glass of wine or indulge in a piece of cake, you now have the added weight of guilt on your shoulders to carry through the neverending winter nights.

Of course not all resolutions involve the abnegation of material pleasures. Many a new year’s promise involves a renewed commitment to work, exercise, or culture-vulching. But again, is this really the best time of year to do that? Given the weather, are you really in the best frame of mind to tackle such a tall order?

No, I don’t think I’ll be making any new year’s resolutions. If anything, this is the time of year when I won’t feel bad about having a pint of ale or a comforting stew. It’s also the time of year when I’m going to cut myself more slack if I’m not exercising diligently or working hard. Let’s face it, just making it through these months intact should be achievement enough.

If I were to make a resolution, it would only be that, come summertime, I’ll take stock and maybe make a commitment to cut down on some guilty pleasure or increase some noble activity then. A midsummer’s resolution, if you will.

Until then, I’ll be cosying up and indulging in any bodily comforts I crave. My resolve to do that is strong.

Friday, December 28th, 2018

Malicious AI Report

Well, this an interesting format experiment—the latest Black Mirror just dropped, and it’s a PDF.

Sunday, February 11th, 2018

Brendan Dawes - Using a Git Repo to create a physical document of the work

There’s something quite Bridlesque about these lovely books that Brendan is generating from git commits.

Monday, November 20th, 2017

Happier HTML5 Form Validation - daverupert.com

Dave uses just a smidgen of JavaScript to whip HTML5’s native form validation into shape.

Instead of being prescriptive about error messaging, we use what the browser natively gives us.

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

Attachment #317095 for bug #175115

I’ve never been so excited by a single diff in a JSON file.

Service workers are coming to Safari.

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

Social Cooling

If you feel you are being watched, you change your behavior. Big Data is supercharging this effect.

Some interesting ideas, but the tone is so alarming as to render the message meaningless.

As our weaknesses are mapped, we are becoming too transparent. This is breeding a society where self-censorship and risk-aversion are the new normal.

I stopped reading at the point where the danger was compared to climate change.

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

100 Days Of Open Source (2017) — Joschi Kuphal · Web architect · Nuremberg / Germany

Joschi is documenting his commitment to “contribute at least one meaningful commit a day to a public Open Source project or a similar community effort.” So far it’s a really nice mix of coding and face-to-face activities.

Friday, January 6th, 2017

Making stuff from scratch in the wild

Making fire, building shelter, throwing spears …all useful post-apocalyptic skills documented on the primitive technology blog.

Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

Smithsonian 3D Apollo 11 Command Module

This is so wonderful! A 3D fly-through of the Apollo 11 command module, right in your browser. It might get your fan whirring, but it’s worth it.

Click through for lots of great details on the interface controls, like which kinds of buttons and switches were chosen for which tasks.

And there’s this lovely note scrawled near the sextant by Michael Collins (the coolest of all the astronauts):

Spacecraft 107, alias Apollo 11, alias ‘Columbia.’ The Best Ship to Come Down the Line. God Bless Her.

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

Saturday, June 25th, 2016

ISP’s are updating your site without your permission

One more reason to make the switch to HTTPS.

Progressive Web Apps Dev Summit | hiddedevries.nl

Hidde’s write-up of the Progressive Web App Dev Summit:

It was exciting to hear about the technologies, and to see that a lot of them already work on a great deal of platforms. Most of the major browser vendors expressed how much they liked the idea, so it is realistic to say support will increase in the short term. This, and the fact that all PWA techniques can be regarded as a ‘progressive enhancement’ (with some leniency as to what that term means), entails that we can build Progressive Web Apps today.

Hopefully, we will do so responsibly. Native apps really only work on their particular platforms. PWAs, in theory, can be built to work universally. For everyone with a web enabled device. This is awesome! Major browser vendors are behind the idea, and I think as developers we should be, too.

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

PWAs: The Panel (Progressive Web App Summit 2016) - YouTube

Here’s the video of the panel I moderated yesterday at the Progressive Web App Dev Summit. I had to get a bit Paxman at times with some of the more media-trained panelists.

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Progressive Web App Dev Summit 2016 | Home

Google have asked me to moderate a panel on the second day of this event in Amsterdam dedicated to progressive web apps. Very brave of them, considering some of my recent posts.

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

IndieWeb Summit 2016 - Portland, Oregon

If you want to go to the Indie Web Summit on June 3rd to 5th (and you should), there’s a travel assistance fund:

If you are a member of a group that is typically underrepresented (e.g. if you are not straight, white, cis and male), and otherwise could not afford to travel to IndieWeb Summit on your own, an anonymous donor has established a $1000 fund to assist individuals from underrepresented backgrounds with travel and/or lodging costs for the Indieweb Summit in Portland.

Saturday, March 5th, 2016

Journal of Design and Science

A new publication from MIT. It deliberately avoids the jargon that’s often part and parcel of peer-reviewed papers, and all of the articles are published under a Creative Commons attribution licence.

The first issue is dedicated to Marvin Minsky and features these superb articles, all of which are independently excellent but together form an even greater whole…

Design and Science by Joi Ito:

When the cybernetics movement began, the focus of science and engineering was on things like guiding a ballistic missile or controlling the temperature in an office. These problems were squarely in the man-made domain and were simple enough to apply the traditional divide-and-conquer method of scientific inquiry.

Science and engineering today, however, is focused on things like synthetic biology or artificial intelligence, where the problems are massively complex. These problems exceed our ability to stay within the domain of the artificial, and make it nearly impossible for us to divide them into existing disciplines.

Age of Entanglement by Neri Oxman:

This essay proposes a map for four domains of creative exploration—Science, Engineering, Design and Art—in an attempt to represent the antidisciplinary hypothesis: that knowledge can no longer be ascribed to, or produced within, disciplinary boundaries, but is entirely entangled.

Design as Participation by Kevin Slavin:

The designers of complex adaptive systems are not strictly designing systems themselves. They are hinting those systems towards anticipated outcomes, from an array of existing interrelated systems. These are designers that do not understand themselves to be in the center of the system. Rather, they understand themselves to be participants, shaping the systems that interact with other forces, ideas, events and other designers. This essay is an exploration of what it means to participate.

The Enlightenment is Dead, Long Live the Entanglement by Danny Hillis:

As our technological and institutional creations have become more complex, our relationship to them has changed. We now relate to them as we once related to nature. Instead of being masters of our creations, we have learned to bargain with them, cajoling and guiding them in the general direction of our goals. We have built our own jungle, and it has a life of its own.