Tags: mp3

22

sparkline

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Audio book

I’ve recorded each chapter of Resilient Web Design as MP3 files that I’ve been releasing once a week. The final chapter is recorded and released so my audio work is done here.

If you want subscribe to the podcast, pop this RSS feed into your podcast software of choice. Or use one of these links:

Or if you can have it as one single MP3 file to listen to as an audio book. It’s two hours long.

So, for those keeping count, the book is now available as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and MP3.

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

Playbutton

A wearable read-only music player that's a badge. Kind of awesome.

Wednesday, October 13th, 2010

Dirpy Studio Beta - Internet DVR - Convert Youtube Videos to Mp3s

A very handy tool for converting YouTube videos to MP3.

Monday, September 27th, 2010

Delivering Sorrow

Hot on the heels of the work for St. Paul’s School, I’ve been tweaking the media queries for the Salter Cane website. I was switching the site over to using HTML5 structural elements anyway, so I figured I’d meddle with the CSS while I was at it.

Once again, the fact that the site was already using percentages made the process very straightforward. Depending on the viewport width, the layout changes from three columns to two columns to one column.

Salter Cane (1440) Salter Cane (1024) Salter Cane (760) Salter Cane (480)

And once again, I didn’t remove any content for small screen devices. The natural language navigation at the top of the page—now correctly ensconced in a nav element—really comes into its own in the linearised layout, allowing for quick access to different sections of the document.

The timing of all this optimisation is fortuitous. The second Salter Cane album has just been released: it’s called Sorrow.

It already has some fans. Shaun said:

The Truth Is Nothing sounds like Leonard Cohen, Johnny Cash and Arcade Fire had a musical transporter accident. can’t stop listening to it.

Lachlan is equally enthusiastic. If you like what you hear, you can buy the physical album from CD Baby or buy the digital album from iTunes. It will be available on Spotify and Amazon soon.

All the songs are licensed under a Creative Commons attribution license which means that they are . I’m looking forward to seeing where they end up.

You can listen to the whole album on the Salter Cane site using a Flash MP3 player. The documentation for Audio Player reads:

To insert a player on the page, place an HTML element and give it a unique ID. This element will be replaced with a player. If the browser doesn’t support Audio Player, the element will not be replaced so use it to show alternative content (maybe a message telling the user to download Flash).

The example code looks like this:

<p id="audioplayer_1">Alternative content</p>
<script type="text/javascript">
AudioPlayer.embed("audioplayer_1", {soundFile: "file.mp3"});
</script>

But rather than using a P element, I used the HTML5 audio element:

<audio id="audioplayer_1" src="file.mp3" controls="controls" preload="none">
</audio>  
<script>  
AudioPlayer.embed("audioplayer_1", {soundFile: "file.mp3"});  
</script>

That way, browsers with Flash installed get the plugin while other devices—like, say, the iPhone, iPod and iPad—get the native audio player.

Audio

Whatever device you’re using, enjoy listening to Sorrow by Salter Cane.

Sunday, March 29th, 2009

Amazon.com MP3 Downloads: Free Indie Sampler Bonanza

Indie compilations for you to download for free.

Friday, January 11th, 2008

Creating Proprietary Content is Like 'Writing in Sand' | Compiler from Wired.com

Tantek talks about the importance of open media for the longevity of data.

Friday, November 2nd, 2007

Episode 21 - .net magazine

I had a chat with Paul Boag this morning and now the podcast episode is online. Me, Paul Hammond, Drew McLellan and Christian Heilmann discuss APIs.

Wednesday, September 26th, 2007

Amazapple

Amazon is selling MP3s. Right now it’s US only (and I’ve got a sneaky US account on the side) but hopefully this will reach foreign shores before too long. Straight out of the starting gate, they’ve got about 2 million songs on offer. Every single one of those songs is encoded at 256kbps with no DRM. It’s that last detail that makes this such a big deal.

I’ve never been able to get my head around the justifications for DRM. In the past, I have been literally sitting in front of my computer with my credit card in hand, eager to spend money on music I love. But rather than greet me with open arms, services like iTunes instead treat me with suspicion, demanding that they get to call the shots about how I can use music that I’ve bought.

For a really egregious example of where this can lead, take note that Virgin Digital is shutting down:

All tracks used Windows Media DRM, and therefore were only playable under Windows and on WMA-compatible devices. The site now advises its customers who have purchased tracks to back them up, as they will not be able to download them again once Virgin Digital has closed. It’s unclear whether the purchasers of individual tracks will be able to access their songs without burning them to CD and reimporting them as MP3s, but it’s better to be safe than sorry if you’re one of those customers. And naturally, subscribing members will lose access altogether once their subscriptions lapse.

DRM-crippled suppliers treat me like a criminal. That turns out to be a self-fulfilling prophesy. It’s precisely because of the DRM that I resort to using peer-to-peer networks or other illicit means of music acquisition.

Make no mistake, the design of the iTunes music store trumps Amazon on just about every level. For most of the purchasing process, the user experience is far superior on iTunes. But the user experience doesn’t end with a financial transaction. The user experience of interacting with the purchased song continues long after leaving the store.

I haven’t bought anything from the iTunes music store because of the DRM. I have used it though: I’ve been given gift certificates for iTunes downloads. This is what I have to do after completing a download:

  1. Pull out the read/write CD I keep just for this,
  2. Burn my new music to the CD,
  3. Rip the music back as MP3,
  4. Erase the CD in preparation for step 1.

And that’s perfectly legal allowed by the terms of service*. But I can’t just convert from DRMed AAC straight to MP3—that would be illegal.

Now, it’s pretty clear that this kind of “copy protection” isn’t going to get in the way of anyone who seriously wants to make copies of the music. All it does is place frustrating stumbling blocks in the path of legitimate customers who want to listen to their purchased music wherever they choose.

I hope that the launch of the Amazon MP3 store is a sign that record companies are finally beginning to realise that people who want their music to be open and portable aren’t criminals—they’re music lovers.

John Gruber puts it best when he says:

Given the Amazon MP3 Store’s audio quality, prices, and user experience, I can’t see why anyone would buy DRM-restricted music from iTunes that’s available from Amazon.

In a wonderful twist, the current number one bestselling song on Amazon is 1234 by Feist— the very song that Apple uses to promote the iPod Nano. And why not? iPods and MP3s have always been a great combination (it always frustrates me when I read reports by lazy journalists that contain statements such as “only songs purchased from Apple’s iTunes music store can be played on the iPod”). I suspect that the vast majority of iPods are filled with un-DRMed music, mostly ripped from CD. Now, thanks to Amazon, there’s also an easy way to fill them with un-DRMed music downloaded from the tubes of the internets.


* Matthew points out that back-ups, archiving, shifting format, all currently illegal in the UK. Here’s the petition to change that. Even the government agrees that the current situation is pretty stupid but the law hasn’t changed.

Friday, May 4th, 2007

Make the logo bigger

Now when your satanic client tells you to make the logo bigger, you can always rock out.

Wednesday, August 30th, 2006

creative bastard

This is a great way to deal with telemarketers.

Monday, June 5th, 2006

CcPublisher 2 - CcWiki

This is a tool for embedding licensing information in files (like MP3s). I'm going to try this out and see how it goes.

Tuesday, November 29th, 2005

AIGA - Talking with Jason Santa Maria: An Event Apart, #04

Stan talks about the upcoming Event Apart in Philadelphia.

Wednesday, October 26th, 2005

Odeo: Create

You can now create podcasts on Odeo. This is going to be huge.

Monday, October 10th, 2005

Yahoo! Podcasts

Quite nice, but a bit too cluttered for my taste. I still prefer Odeo.

Thursday, August 11th, 2005

CoverFlow

A nifty app for OS X that allows you to browse your iTunes music by album cover.

Wednesday, July 27th, 2005

Monday, July 11th, 2005

Apple - Support - GarageBand - Recording Your Podcast

Scroll down to the end - Apple are offering a command line tool for adding chapters to podcasts. You can also add images which will show up in the artwork window of iTunes.

Smithsonian Global Sound

A fantastic online music store from the Smithsonian. You can download MP3s and liner notes.

Monday, June 20th, 2005

A BBC radio report on blogging

Tom Coates, Heather Armstrong and others weigh in with their thoughts. Tom has a sexy radio voice.

Saturday, June 18th, 2005

DittyBot - An Applescript Adventure

Coolest use of Automater ever. Send an SMS form your phone to your POP account and your Mac will call you back over Skype to play you an MP3.