Tags: offline

185

sparkline

Thursday, August 1st, 2019

Navigation preloads in service workers

There’s a feature in service workers called navigation preloads. It’s relatively recent, so it isn’t supported in every browser, but it’s still well worth using.

Here’s the problem it solves…

If someone makes a return visit to your site, and the service worker you installed on their machine isn’t active yet, the service worker boots up, and then executes its instructions. If those instructions say “fetch the page from the network”, then you’re basically telling the browser to do what it would’ve done anyway if there were no service worker installed. The only difference is that there’s been a slight delay because the service worker had to boot up first.

  1. The service worker activates.
  2. The service worker fetches the file.
  3. The service worker does something with the response.

It’s not a massive performance hit, but it’s still a bit annoying. It would be better if the service worker could boot up and still be requesting the page at the same time, like it would do if no service worker were present. That’s where navigation preloads come in.

  1. The service worker activates while simultaneously requesting the file.
  2. The service worker does something with the response.

Navigation preloads—like the name suggests—are only initiated when someone navigates to a URL on your site, either by following a link, or a bookmark, or by typing a URL directly into a browser. Navigation preloads don’t apply to requests made by a web page for things like images, style sheets, and scripts. By the time a request is made for one of those, the service worker is already up and running.

To enable navigation preloads, call the enable() method on registration.navigationPreload during the activate event in your service worker script. But first do a little feature detection to make sure registration.navigationPreload exists in this browser:

if (registration.navigationPreload) {
  addEventListener('activate', activateEvent => {
    activateEvent.waitUntil(
      registration.navigationPreload.enable()
    );
  });
}

If you’ve already got event listeners on the activate event, that’s absolutely fine: addEventListener isn’t exclusive—you can use it to assign multiple tasks to the same event.

Now you need to make use of navigation preloads when you’re responding to fetch events. So if your strategy is to look in the cache first, there’s probably no point enabling navigation preloads. But if your default strategy is to fetch a page from the network, this will help.

Let’s say your current strategy for handling page requests looks like this:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
  const request = fetchEvent.request;
  if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
      fetch(request)
      .then( responseFromFetch => {
        // maybe cache this response for later here.
        return responseFromFetch;
      })
      .catch( fetchError => {
        return caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
          return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
        });
      })
    );
  }
});

That’s a fairly standard strategy: try the network first; if that doesn’t work, try the cache; as a last resort, show an offline page.

It’s that first step (“try the network first”) that can benefit from navigation preloads. If a preload request is already in flight, you’ll want to use that instead of firing off a new fetch request. Otherwise you’re making two requests for the same file.

To find out if a preload request is underway, you can check for the existence of the preloadResponse promise, which will be made available as a property of the fetch event you’re handling:

fetchEvent.preloadResponse

If that exists, you’ll want to use it instead of fetch(request).

if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
  // do something with fetchEvent.preloadResponse
} else {
  // do something with fetch(request)
}

You could structure your code like this:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
  const request = fetchEvent.request;
  if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
      fetchEvent.respondWith(
        fetchEvent.preloadResponse
        .then( responseFromPreload => {
          // maybe cache this response for later here.
          return responseFromPreload;
        })
        .catch( preloadError => {
          return caches.match(request)
          .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
          });
        })
      );
    } else {
      fetchEvent.respondWith(
        fetch(request)
        .then( responseFromFetch => {
          // maybe cache this response for later here.
          return responseFromFetch;
        })
        .catch( fetchError => {
          return caches.match(request)
          .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
          });
        })
      );
    }
  }
});

But that’s not very DRY. Your logic is identical, regardless of whether the response is coming from fetch(request) or from fetchEvent.preloadResponse. It would be better if you could minimise the amount of duplication.

One way of doing that is to abstract away the promise you’re going to use into a variable. Let’s call it retrieve. If a preload is underway, we’ll assign it to that variable:

let retrieve;
if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
  retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse;
}

If there is no preload happening (or this browser doesn’t support it), assign a regular fetch request to the retrieve variable:

let retrieve;
if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
  retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse;
} else {
  retrieve = fetch(request);
}

If you like, you can squash that into a ternary operator:

const retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse ? fetchEvent.preloadResponse : fetch(request);

Use whichever syntax you find more readable.

Now you can apply the same logic, regardless of whether retrieve is a preload navigation or a fetch request:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
  const request = fetchEvent.request;
  if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    const retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse ? fetchEvent.preloadResponse : fetch(request);
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
      retrieve
      .then( responseFromRetrieve => {
        // maybe cache this response for later here.
       return responseFromRetrieve;
      })
      .catch( fetchError => {
        return caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
          return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
        });
      })
    );
  }
});

I think that’s the least invasive way to update your existing service worker script to take advantage of navigation preloads.

Like I said, preload navigations can give a bit of a performance boost if you’re using a network-first strategy. That’s what I’m doing here on adactio.com and on thesession.org so I’ve updated their service workers to take advantage of navigation preloads. But on Resilient Web Design, which uses a cache-first strategy, there wouldn’t be much point enabling navigation preloads.

Jeff Posnick made this point in his write-up of bringing service workers to Google search:

Adding a service worker to your web app means inserting an additional piece of JavaScript that needs to be loaded and executed before your web app gets responses to its requests. If those responses end up coming from a local cache rather than from the network, then the overhead of running the service worker is usually negligible in comparison to the performance win from going cache-first. But if you know that your service worker always has to consult the network when handling navigation requests, using navigation preload is a crucial performance win.

Oh, and those browsers that don’t yet support navigation preloads? No problem. It’s a progressive enhancement. Everything still works just like it did before. And having a service worker on your site in the first place is itself a progressive enhancement. So enabling navigation preloads is like a progressive enhancement within a progressive enhancement. It’s progressive enhancements all the way down!

By the way, if all of this service worker stuff sounds like gibberish, but you wish you understood it, I think my book, Going Offline, will prove quite valuable.

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019

You are not connected to the Internet

This is a very cute offline page. Ali Spittel has written up how it was made too.

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2019

The trimCache function in Going Offline …again

It seems that some code that I wrote in Going Offline is haunted. It’s the trimCache function.

First, there was the issue of a typo. Or maybe it’s more of a brainfart than a typo, but either way, there’s a mistake in the syntax that was published in the book.

Now it turns out that there’s also a problem with my logic.

To recap, this is a function that takes two arguments: the name of a cache, and the maximum number of items that cache should hold.

function trimCache(cacheName, maxItems) {

First, we open up the cache:

caches.open(cacheName)
.then( cache => {

Then, we get the items (keys) in that cache:

cache.keys()
.then(keys => {

Now we compare the number of items (keys.length) to the maximum number of items allowed:

if (keys.length > maxItems) {

If there are too many items, delete the first item in the cache—that should be the oldest item:

cache.delete(keys[0])

And then run the function again:

.then(
    trimCache(cacheName, maxItems)
);

A-ha! See the problem?

Neither did I.

It turns out that, even though I’m using then, the function will be invoked immediately, instead of waiting until the first item has been deleted.

Trys helped me understand what was going on by making a useful analogy. You know when you use setTimeout, you can’t put a function—complete with parentheses—as the first argument?

window.setTimeout(doSomething(someValue), 1000);

In that example, doSomething(someValue) will be invoked immediately—not after 1000 milliseconds. Instead, you need to create an anonymous function like this:

window.setTimeout( function() {
    doSomething(someValue)
}, 1000);

Well, it’s the same in my trimCache function. Instead of this:

cache.delete(keys[0])
.then(
    trimCache(cacheName, maxItems)
);

I need to do this:

cache.delete(keys[0])
.then( function() {
    trimCache(cacheName, maxItems)
});

Or, if you prefer the more modern arrow function syntax:

cache.delete(keys[0])
.then( () => {
    trimCache(cacheName, maxItems)
});

Either way, I have to wrap the recursive function call in an anonymous function.

Here’s a gist with the updated trimCache function.

What’s annoying is that this mistake wasn’t throwing an error. Instead, it was causing a performance problem. I’m using this pattern right here on my own site, and whenever my cache of pages or images gets too big, the trimCaches function would get called …and then wouldn’t stop running.

I’m very glad that—witht the help of Trys at last week’s Homebrew Website Club Brighton—I was finally able to get to the bottom of this. If you’re using the trimCache function in your service worker, please update the code accordingly.

Management regrets the error.

Friday, June 7th, 2019

Jeremy Keith: Going offline - YouTube

Here’s the opening keynote I gave at Frontend United in Utrecht a few weeks back.

Wednesday, May 8th, 2019

Timing out

Service workers are great for creating a good user experience when someone is offline. Heck, the book I wrote about service workers is literally called Going Offline.

But in some ways, the offline experience is relatively easy to handle. It’s a binary situation; either you’re online or you’re offline. What’s more challenging—and probably more common—is the situation that Jake calls Lie-Fi. That’s when technically you’ve got a network connection …but it’s a shitty connection, like one bar of mobile signal. In that situation, because there’s technically a connection, the user gets a slow frustrating experience. Whatever code you’ve got in your service worker for handling offline situations will never get triggered. When you’re handling fetch events inside a service worker, there’s no automatic time-out.

But you can make one.

That’s what I’ve done recently here on adactio.com. Before showing you what I added to my service worker script to make that happen, let me walk you through my existing strategy for handling offline situations.

Service worker strategies

Alright, so in my service worker script, I’ve got a block of code for handling requests from fetch events:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
        const request = fetchEvent.request;
    // Do something with this request.
});

I’ve got two strategies in my code. One is for dealing with requests for pages:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    // Code for handling page requests.
}

By adding an else clause I can have a different strategy for dealing with requests for anything else—images, style sheets, scripts, and so on:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    // Code for handling page requests.
} else {
    // Code for handling everthing else.
}

For page requests, I’m going to try to go the network first:

fetchEvent.respondWith(
    fetch(request)
    .then( responseFromFetch => {
        return responseFromFetch;
    })

My logic is:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network.

If that doesn’t work, we’re in an offline situation. That triggers the catch clause. That’s where I have my offline strategy: show a custom offline page that I’ve previously cached (during the install event):

.catch( fetchError => {
    return caches.match('/offline');
})

Now my logic has been expanded to this:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network, but if that doesn’t work, show a custom offline page instead.

So my overall code for dealing with requests for pages looks like this:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
        fetch(request)
        .then( responseFromFetch => {
            return responseFromFetch;
        })
        .catch( fetchError => {
            return caches.match('/offline');
        })
    );
}

Now I can fill in the else statement that handles everything else—images, style sheets, scripts, and so on. Here my strategy is different. I’m looking in my caches first, and I only fetch the file from network if the file can’t be found in any cache:

caches.match(request)
.then( responseFromCache => {
    return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
})

Here’s all that fetch-handling code put together:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            fetch(request)
            .then( responseFromFetch => {
                return responseFromFetch;
            })
            .catch( fetchError => {
                return caches.match('/offline');
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
        })
    }
});

Good.

Cache as you go

Now I want to introduce an extra step in the part of the code where I deal with requests for pages. Whenever I fetch a page from the network, I’m going to take the opportunity to squirrel it away in a cache. I’m calling that cache “pages”. I’m imaginative like that.

fetchEvent.respondWith(
    fetch(request)
    .then( responseFromFetch => {
        const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
        try {
            fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                caches.open('pages')
                .then( pagesCache => {
                    return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                })
            )
        } catch(error) {
            console.error(error);
        }
        return responseFromFetch;
    })

You’ll notice that I can’t put the response itself (responseFromCache) into the cache. That’s a stream that I only get to use once. Instead I need to make a copy:

const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();

That’s what gets put in the pages cache:

fetchEvent.waitUntil(
    caches.open('pages')
    .then( pagesCache => {
        return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
    })
)

Now my logic for page requests has an extra piece to it:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, show a custom offline page instead.

Here’s my updated fetch-handling code:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            fetch(request)
            .then( responseFromFetch => {
                const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
                try {
                    fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                        caches.open('pages')
                        .then( pagesCache => {
                            return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                        })
                    )
                } catch(error) {
                    console.error(error);
                }
                return responseFromFetch;
            })
            .catch( fetchError => {
                return caches.match('/offline');
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
        })
    }
});

I call this the cache-as-you-go pattern. The more pages someone views on my site, the more pages they’ll have cached.

Now that there’s an ever-growing cache of previously visited pages, I can update my offline fallback. Currently, I reach straight for the custom offline page:

.catch( fetchError => {
    return caches.match('/offline');
})

But now I can try looking for a cached copy of the requested page first:

.catch( fetchError => {
    caches.match(request)
    .then( responseFromCache => {
        return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
    })
});

Now my offline logic is expanded:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, first look for an existing copy in a cache, and otherwise show a custom offline page instead.

I can also access this ever-growing cache of pages from my custom offline page to show people which pages they can revisit, even if there’s no internet connection.

So far, so good. Everything I’ve outlined so far is a good robust strategy for handling offline situations. Now I’m going to deal with the lie-fi situation, and it’s that cache-as-you-go strategy that sets me up nicely.

Timing out

I want to throw this addition into my logic:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, first look for an existing copy in a cache, and otherwise show a custom offline page instead (but if the request is taking too long, try to show a cached version of the page).

The first thing I’m going to do is rewrite my code a bit. If the fetch event is for a page, I’m going to respond with a promise:

if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
        new Promise( resolveWithResponse => {
            // Code for handling page requests.
        })
    );
}

Promises are kind of weird things to get your head around. They’re tailor-made for doing things asynchronously. You can set up two parameters; a success condition and a failure condition. If the success condition is executed, then we say the promise has resolved. If the failure condition is executed, then the promise rejects.

In my re-written code, I’m calling the success condition resolveWithResponse (and I haven’t bothered with a failure condition, tsk, tsk). I’m going to use resolveWithResponse in my promise everywhere that I used to have a return statement:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            new Promise( resolveWithResponse => {
                fetch(request)
                .then( responseFromFetch => {
                    const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
                    try {
                        fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                            caches.open('pages')
                            then( pagesCache => {
                                return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                            })
                        )
                    } catch(error) {
                        console.error(error);
                    }
                    resolveWithResponse(responseFromFetch);
                })
                .catch( fetchError => {
                    caches.match(request)
                    .then( responseFromCache => {
                        resolveWithResponse(
                            responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline')
                        );
                    })
                })
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request);
        })
    }
});

By itself, rewriting my code as a promise doesn’t change anything. Everything’s working the same as it did before. But now I can introduce the time-out logic. I’m going to put this inside my promise:

const timer = setTimeout( () => {
    caches.match(request)
    .then( responseFromCache => {
        if (responseFromCache) {
            resolveWithResponse(responseFromCache);
        }
    })
}, 3000);

If a request takes three seconds (3000 milliseconds), then that code will execute. At that point, the promise attempts to resolve with a response from the cache instead of waiting for the network. If there is a cached response, that’s what the user now gets. If there isn’t, then the wait continues for the network.

The last thing left for me to do is cancel the countdown to timing out if a network response does return within three seconds. So I put this in the then clause that’s triggered by a successful network response:

clearTimeout(timer);

I also add the clearTimeout statement to the catch clause that handles offline situations. Here’s the final code:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
    const request = fetchEvent.request;
    if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
        fetchEvent.respondWith(
            new Promise( resolveWithResponse => {
                const timer = setTimeout( () => {
                    caches.match(request)
                    .then( responseFromCache => {
                        if (responseFromCache) {
                            resolveWithResponse(responseFromCache);
                        }
                    })
                }, 3000);
                fetch(request)
                .then( responseFromFetch => {
                    clearTimeout(timer);
                    const copy = responseFromFetch.clone();
                    try {
                        fetchEvent.waitUntil(
                            caches.open('pages')
                            then( pagesCache => {
                                return pagesCache.put(request, copy);
                            })
                        )
                    } catch(error) {
                        console.error(error);
                    }
                    resolveWithResponse(responseFromFetch);
                })
                .catch( fetchError => {
                    clearTimeout(timer);
                    caches.match(request)
                    .then( responseFromCache => {
                        resolveWithResponse(
                            responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline')
                        );
                    })
                })
            })
        );
    } else {
        caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || fetch(request)
        })
    }
});

That’s the JavaScript translation of this logic:

When someone requests a page, try to fetch it from the network and store a copy in a cache, but if that doesn’t work, first look for an existing copy in a cache, and otherwise show a custom offline page instead (but if the request is taking too long, try to show a cached version of the page).

For everything else, try finding a cached version first, otherwise fetch it from the network.

Pros and cons

As with all service worker enhancements to a website, this strategy will do absolutely nothing for first-time visitors. If you’ve never visited my site before, you’ve got nothing cached. But the more you return to the site, the more your cache is primed for speedy retrieval.

I think that serving up a cached copy of a page when the network connection is flaky is a pretty good strategy …most of the time. If we’re talking about a blog post on this site, then sure, there won’t be much that the reader is missing out on—a fixed typo or ten; maybe some additional webmentions at the end of a post. But if we’re talking about the home page, then a reader with a flaky network connection might think there’s nothing new to read when they’re served up a stale version.

What I’d really like is some way to know—on the client side—whether or not the currently-loaded page came from a cache or from a network. Then I could add some kind of interface element that says, “Hey, this page might be stale—click here if you want to check for a fresher version.” I’d also need some way in the service worker to identify any requests originating from that interface element and make sure they always go out to the network.

I think that should be doable somehow. If you can think of a way to do it, please share it. Write a blog post and send me the link.

But even without the option to over-ride the time-out, I’m glad that I’m at least doing something to handle the lie-fi situation. Perhaps I should write a sequel to Going Offline called Still Online But Only In Theory Because The Connection Sucks.

Saturday, April 13th, 2019

Offline fallback page with service worker - Modern Web Development: Tales of a Developer Advocate by Paul Kinlan

Paul describes a fairly straightforward service worker recipe: a custom offline page for failed requests.

Friday, March 29th, 2019

Benjamin Parry Home-brew

I love the way that Benjamin is documenting his activities at Homebrew Website Club Brighton each week:

Another highly productive 90 mins.

Homebrew website club is on every Thursday evening 6.00-7.30pm at Clearleft. You should come along!

Friday, March 22nd, 2019

Benjamin Parry Offline Homebrewing

Two of my favourite things: indie web and service workers.

This makes me so happy. I remember saying when my book came out, that the best feedback I could possibly get would be readers making their websites work offline. The same can be said for the talk of the book.

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

Going Offline—the talk of the book

I gave a new talk at An Event Apart in Seattle yesterday morning. The talk was called Going Offline, which the eagle-eyed amongst you will recognise as the title of my most recent book, all about service workers.

I was quite nervous about this talk. It’s very different from my usual fare. Usually I have some big sweeping arc of history, and lots of pretentious ideas joined together into some kind of narrative arc. But this talk needed to be more straightforward and practical. I wasn’t sure how well I would manage that brief.

I knew from pretty early on that I was going to show—and explain—some code examples. Those were the parts I sweated over the most. I knew I’d be presenting to a mixed audience of designers, developers, and other web professionals. I couldn’t assume too much existing knowledge. At the same time, I didn’t want to teach anyone to such eggs.

In the end, there was an overarching meta-theme to talk, which was this: logic is more important than code. In other words, figuring out what you’re trying to accomplish (and describing it clearly) is more important than typing curly braces and semi-colons. Programming is an act of translation. Before you can translate something, you need to be able to articulate it clearly in your own language first. By emphasising that point, I hoped to make the code less overwhelming to people unfamilar with it.

I had tested the talk with some of my Clearleft colleagues, and they gave me great feedback. But I never know until I’ve actually given a talk in front of a real conference audience whether the talk is any good or not. Now that I’ve given the talk, and received more feedback, I think I can confidentally say that it’s pretty damn good.

My goal was to explain some fairly gnarly concepts—let’s face it: service workers are downright weird, and not the easiest thing to get your head around—and to leave the audience with two feelings:

  1. This is exciting, and
  2. This is something I can do today.

I deliberately left time for questions, bribing people with free copies of my book. I got some great questions, and I may incorporate some of them into future versions of this talk (conference organisers, if this sounds like the kind of talk you’d like at your event, please get in touch). Some of the points brought up in the questions were:

  • Is there some kind of wizard for creating a typical service worker script for any site? I didn’t have a direct answer to this, but I have attempted to make a minimal viable service worker that could be used for just about any site. Mostly I encouraged the questioner to roll their sleeves up and try writing a bespoke script. I also mentioned the Workbox library, but I gave my opinion that if you’re going to spend the time to learn the library, you may as well spend the time to learn the underlying language.
  • What are some state-of-the-art progressive web apps for offline user experiences? Ooh, this one kind of stumped me. I mean, the obvious poster children for progressive webs apps are things like Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. They’re all great but the offline experience is somewhat limited. To be honest, I think there’s more potential for great offline experiences by publishers. I especially love the pattern on personal sites like Una’s and Sara’s where people can choose to save articles offline to read later—like a bespoke Instapaper or Pocket. I’d love so see that pattern adopted by some big publications. I particularly like that gives so much more control directly to the end user. Instead of trying to guess what kind of offline experience they want, we give them the tools to craft their own.
  • Do caches get cleaned up automatically? Great question! And the answer is mostly no—although browsers do have their own heuristics about how much space you get to play with. There’s a whole chapter in my book about being a good citizen and cleaning up your caches, but I didn’t include that in the talk because it isn’t exactly exciting: “Hey everyone! Now we’re going to do some housekeeping—yay!”
  • Isn’t there potential for abuse here? This is related to the previous question, and it’s another great question to ask of any technology. In short, yes. Bad actors could use service workers to fill up caches uneccesarily. I’ve written about back door service workers too, although the real problem there is with iframes rather than service workers—iframes and cookies are technologies that are already being abused by bad actors, and we’re going to see more and more interventions by ethical browser makers (like Mozilla) to clamp down on those technologies …just as browsers had to clamp down on the abuse of pop-up windows in the early days of JavaScript. The cache API could become a tragedy of the commons. I liken the situation to regulation: we should self-regulate, but if we prove ourselves incapable of that, then outside regulation (by browsers) will be imposed upon us.
  • What kind of things are in the future for service workers? Excellent question! If you think about it, a service worker is kind of a conduit that gives you access to different APIs: the Cache API and the Fetch API being the main ones now. A service worker is like an airport and the APIs are like the airlines. There are other APIs that you can access through service workers. Notifications are available now on desktop and on Android, and they’ll be coming to iOS soon. Background Sync is another powerful API accessed through service workers that will get more and more browser support over time. The great thing is that you can start using these APIs today even if they aren’t universally supported. Then, over time, more and more of your users will benefit from those enhancements.

If you attended the talk and want to learn more about about service workers, there’s my book (obvs), but I’ve also written lots of blog posts about service workers and I’ve linked to lots of resources too.

Finally, here’s a list of links to all the books, sites, and articles I referenced in my talk…

Books

Sites

Progressive Web Apps

Tuesday, January 15th, 2019

JournalBook

A small but perfectly formed progressive web app. It’s a private, offline-first personal journal with no log-in and no server-stored data. You can read about the tech stack behind it:

Your notes are only stored on your device — they’re never sent to a server. You don’t even need to sign-in to use it! It works offline, so you can reflect upon your day on the slow train journey home.

Tuesday, December 18th, 2018

The 15 Web Design Books of 2018 You Can’t Afford to Miss

How lovely! Going Offline is in very good company in this list, and Oliver has some nice words to say about it:

Starting with no assumption of JavaScript knowledge, Jeremy explains the latest strategies, the ins and outs of fetching and caching, how to enhance your website’s performance, and more.

Extremely beginner-friendly and approachable, it can be read in half a day and will help you get Service Workers up and running in no time.

But all I want for Christmas is for Shopify to stop enabling Breitbart.

Thursday, December 13th, 2018

Learning to unlearn – The Sea of Ideas

This is the real challenge for service workers:

For 30 years, we taught billions of humans that you need to be connected to the internet to consume the web via a browser! This means web users need to unlearn that web sites can’t be used offline.

Thursday, December 6th, 2018

Introducing Background Fetch  |  Web  |  Google Developers

I’m going to have to read through this article by Jake a few times before I begin to wrap my head around this background fetch thing, but it looks like it would be perfect for something like the dConstruct Audio Archive, where fairly large files can be saved for offline listening.

Mistletoe Offline

This article first appeared in 24 Ways, the online advent calendar for geeks.

It’s that time of year, when we gather together as families to celebrate the life of the greatest person in history. This man walked the Earth long before us, but he left behind words of wisdom. Those words can guide us every single day, but they are at the forefront of our minds during this special season.

I am, of course, talking about Murphy, and the golden rule he gave unto us:

Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.

So true! I mean, that’s why we make sure we’ve got nice 404 pages. It’s not that we want people to ever get served a File Not Found message, but we acknowledge that, despite our best efforts, it’s bound to happen sometime. Murphy’s Law, innit?

But there are some Murphyesque situations where even your lovingly crafted 404 page won’t help. What if your web server is down? What if someone is trying to reach your site but they lose their internet connection? These are all things than can—and will—go wrong.

I guess there’s nothing we can do about those particular situations, right?

Wrong!

A service worker is a Murphy-battling technology that you can inject into a visitor’s device from your website. Once it’s installed, it can intercept any requests made to your domain. If anything goes wrong with a request—as is inevitable—you can provide instructions for the browser. That’s your opportunity to turn those server outage frowns upside down. Take those network connection lemons and make network connection lemonade.

If you’ve got a custom 404 page, why not make a custom offline page too?

Get your server in order

Step one is to make …actually, wait. There’s a step before that. Step zero. Get your site running on HTTPS, if it isn’t already. You won’t be able to use a service worker unless everything’s being served over HTTPS, which makes sense when you consider the awesome power that a service worker wields.

If you’re developing locally, service workers will work fine for localhost, even without HTTPS. But for a live site, HTTPS is a must.

Make an offline page

Alright, assuming your site is being served over HTTPS, then step one is to create an offline page. Make it as serious or as quirky as is appropriate for your particular brand. If the website is for a restaurant, maybe you could put the telephone number and address of the restaurant on the custom offline page (unsolicited advice: you could also put this on the home page, you know). Here’s an example of the custom offline page for this year’s Ampersand conference.

When you’re done, publish the offline page at suitably imaginative URL, like, say /offline.html.

Pre-cache your offline page

Now create a JavaScript file called serviceworker.js. This is the script that the browser will look to when certain events are triggered. The first event to handle is what to do when the service worker is installed on the user’s device. When that happens, an event called install is fired. You can listen out for this event using addEventListener:

addEventListener('install', installEvent => {
// put your instructions here.
}); // end addEventListener

In this case, you want to make sure that your lovingly crafted custom offline page is put into a nice safe cache. You can use the Cache API to do this. You get to create as many caches as you like, and you can call them whatever you want. Here, I’m going to call the cache Johnny just so I can refer to it as JohnnyCache in the code:

addEventListener('install', installEvent => {
  installEvent.waitUntil(
    caches.open('Johnny')
    .then( JohnnyCache => {
      JohnnyCache.addAll([
       '/offline.html'
      ]); // end addAll
     }) // end open.then
  ); // end waitUntil
}); // end addEventListener

I’m betting that your lovely offline page is linking to a CSS file, maybe an image or two, and perhaps some JavaScript. You can cache all of those at this point:

addEventListener('install', installEvent => {
  installEvent.waitUntil(
    caches.open('Johnny')
    .then( JohnnyCache => {
      JohnnyCache.addAll([
       '/offline.html',
       '/path/to/stylesheet.css',
       '/path/to/javascript.js',
         '/path/to/image.jpg'
      ]); // end addAll
     }) // end open.then
  ); // end waitUntil
}); // end addEventListener

Make sure that the URLs are correct. If just one of the URLs in the list fails to resolve, none of the items in the list will be cached.

Intercept requests

The next event you want to listen for is the fetch event. This is probably the most powerful—and, let’s be honest, the creepiest—feature of a service worker. Once it has been installed, the service worker lurks on the user’s device, waiting for any requests made to your site. Every time the user requests a web page from your site, a fetch event will fire. Every time that page requests a style sheet or an image, a fetch event will fire. You can provide instructions for what should happen each time:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
// What happens next is up to you!
}); // end addEventListener

Let’s write a fairly conservative script with the following logic:

  • Whenever a file is requested,
  • First, try to fetch it from the network,
  • But if that doesn’t work, try to find it in the cache,
  • But if that doesn’t work, and it’s a request for a web page, show the custom offline page instead.

Here’s how that translates into JavaScript:

// Whenever a file is requested
addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
  const request = fetchEvent.request;
  fetchEvent.respondWith(
    // First, try to fetch it from the network
    fetch(request)
    .then( responseFromFetch => {
      return responseFromFetch;
    }) // end fetch.then
    // But if that doesn't work
    .catch( fetchError => {
      // try to find it in the cache
      caches.match(request)
      .then( responseFromCache => {
        if (responseFromCache) {
         return responseFromCache;
       // But if that doesn't work
       } else {
         // and it's a request for a web page
         if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
           // show the custom offline page instead
           return caches.match('/offline.html');
         } // end if
       } // end if/else
     }) // end match.then
   }) // end fetch.catch
  ); // end respondWith
}); // end addEventListener

I am fully aware that I may have done some owl-drawing there. If you need a more detailed breakdown of what’s happening at each point in the code, I’ve written a whole book for you. It’s the perfect present for Murphymas.

Hook up your service worker script

You can publish your service worker script at /serviceworker.js but you still need to tell the browser where to look for it. You can do that using JavaScript. Put this in an existing JavaScript file that you’re calling in to every page on your site, or add this in a script element at the end of every page’s HTML:

if (navigator.serviceWorker) {
  navigator.serviceWorker.register('/serviceworker.js');
}

That tells the browser to start installing the service worker, but not without first checking that the browser understands what a service worker is. When it comes to JavaScript, feature detection is your friend.

You might already have some JavaScript files in a folder like /assets/js/ and you might be tempted to put your service worker script in there too. Don’t do that. If you do, the service worker will only be able to handle requests made to for files within /assets/js/. By putting the service worker script in the root directory, you’re making sure that every request can be intercepted.

Go further!

Nicely done! You’ve made sure that if—no, when—a visitor can’t reach your website, they’ll get your hand-tailored offline page. You have temporarily defeated the forces of chaos! You have briefly fought the tide of entropy! You have made a small but ultimately futile gesture against the inevitable heat-death of the universe!

This is just the beginning. You can do more with service workers.

What if, every time you fetched a page from the network, you stored a copy of that page in a cache? Then if that person tries to reach that page later, but they’re offline, you could show them the cached version.

Or, what if instead of reaching out the network first, you checked to see if a file is in the cache first? You could serve up that cached version—which would be blazingly fast—and still fetch a fresh version from the network in the background to pop in the cache for next time. That might be a good strategy for images.

So many options! The hard part isn’t writing the code, it’s figuring out the steps you want to take. Once you’ve got those steps written out, then it’s a matter of translating them into JavaScript.

Inevitably there will be some obstacles along the way—usually it’s a misplaced curly brace or a missing parenthesis. Don’t be too hard on yourself if your code doesn’t work at first. That’s just Murphy’s Law in action.

Wednesday, December 5th, 2018

Going Offline First (Video Series)

A five-part video series from Ire on how she built the “save for offline” functionality on her site.

The first one is about getting a set set up on Ghost so you can probably safely skip that one and go straight to the second video to get down to the nitty-gritty of the Cache API and service workers.

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

Mistletoe Offline ◆ 24 ways

They let me write a 24 Ways article again. Will they never learn?

This one’s a whirlwind tour of using a service worker to provide a custom offline page, in the style of Going Offline.

By the way, just for the record, I initially rejected this article’s title out of concern that injecting a Cliff Richard song into people’s brains was cruel and unusual punishment. I was overruled.

Monday, November 12th, 2018

Home  |  web.dev

I guess this domain name is why our local developmemnt environments stopped working.

Anyway, it’s a web interface onto Lighthouse (note that it has the same bugs as the version of Lighthouse in Chrome). Kind of like webhint.io.

Sunday, November 11th, 2018

Push without notifications

On the first day of Indie Web Camp Berlin, I led a session on going offline with service workers. This covered all the usual use-cases: pre-caching; custom offline pages; saving pages for offline reading.

But on the second day, Sebastiaan spent a fair bit of time investigating a more complex use of service workers with the Push API.

The Push API is what makes push notifications possible on the web. There are a lot of moving parts—browser, server, service worker—and, frankly, it’s way over my head. But I’m familiar with the general gist of how it works. Here’s a typical flow:

  1. A website prompts the user for permission to send push notifications.
  2. The user grants permission.
  3. A whole lot of complicated stuff happens behinds the scenes.
  4. Next time the website publishes something relevant, it fires a push message containing the details of the new URL.
  5. The user’s service worker receives the push message (even if the site isn’t open).
  6. The service worker creates a notification linking to the URL, interrupting the user, and generally adding to the weight of information overload.

Here’s what Sebastiaan wanted to investigate: what if that last step weren’t so intrusive? Here’s the alternate flow he wanted to test:

  1. A website prompts the user for permission to send push notifications.
  2. The user grants permission.
  3. A whole lot of complicated stuff happens behinds the scenes.
  4. Next time the website publishes something relevant, it fires a push message containing the details of the new URL.
  5. The user’s service worker receives the push message (even if the site isn’t open).
  6. The service worker fetches the contents of the URL provided in the push message and caches the page. Silently.

It worked.

I think this could be a real game-changer. I don’t know about you, but I’m very, very wary of granting websites the ability to send me push notifications. In fact, I don’t think I’ve ever given a website permission to interrupt me with push notifications.

You’ve seen the annoying permission dialogues, right?

In Firefox, it looks like this:

Will you allow name-of-website to send notifications?

[Not Now] [Allow Notifications]

In Chrome, it’s:

name-of-website wants to

Show notifications

[Block] [Allow]

But in actual fact, these dialogues are asking for permission to do two things:

  1. Receive messages pushed from the server.
  2. Display notifications based on those messages.

There’s no way to ask for permission just to do the first part. That’s a shame. While I’m very unwilling to grant permission to be interrupted by intrusive notifications, I’d be more than willing to grant permission to allow a website to silently cache timely content in the background. It would be a more calm technology.

Think of the use cases:

  • I grant push permission to a magazine. When the magazine publishes a new article, it’s cached on my device.
  • I grant push permission to a podcast. Whenever a new episode is published, it’s cached on my device.
  • I grant push permission to a blog. When there’s a new blog post, it’s cached on my device.

Then when I’m on a plane, or in the subway, or in any other situation without a network connection, I could still visit these websites and get content that’s fresh to me. It’s kind of like background sync in reverse.

There’s plenty of opportunity for abuse—the cache could get filled with content. But websites can already do that, and they don’t need to be granted any permissions to do so; just by visiting a website, it can add multiple files to a cache.

So it seems that the reason for the permissions dialogue is all about displaying notifications …not so much about receiving push messages from the server.

I wish there were a way to implement this background-caching pattern without requiring the user to grant permission to a dialogue that contains the word “notification.”

I wonder if the act of adding a site to the home screen could implicitly grant permission to allow use of the Push API without notifications?

In the meantime, the proposal for periodic synchronisation (using background sync) could achieve similar results, but in a less elegant way; periodically polling for new content instead of receiving a push message when new content is published. Also, it requires permission. But at least in this case, the permission dialogue should be more specific, and wouldn’t include the word “notification” anywhere.

Thursday, November 8th, 2018

A Book Apart, Front-End Next Steps

If you buy this bundle of books, you get Going Offline in some very, very good company.

Monday, October 22nd, 2018

PWA Directory

Another directory of progressive web apps, this time maintained by Google.

I quite like the way it links through to a Lighthouse report. Here’s the listing for The Session, for example, and here’s the corresponding Lighthouse report.