Tags: paper



Sunday, February 11th, 2018

Brendan Dawes - Using a Git Repo to create a physical document of the work

There’s something quite Bridlesque about these lovely books that Brendan is generating from git commits.

Saturday, January 13th, 2018

The Human Computer’s Dreams Of The Future by Ida Rhodes (PDF)

From the proceedings of the Electronic Computer Symposium in 1952, the remarkable Ida Rhodes describes a vision of the future…

My crystal ball reveals Mrs. Mary Jones in the living room of her home, most of the walls doubling as screens for projected art or information. She has just dialed her visiophone. On the wall panel facing her, the full colored image of a rare orchid fades, to be replaced by the figure of Mr. Brown seated at his desk. Mrs. Jones states her business: she wishes her valuable collection of orchid plants insured. Mr. Brown consults a small code book and dials a string of figures. A green light appears on his wall. He asks Mrs. Jones a few pertinent questions and types out her replies. He then pushes the start button. Mr. Brown fades from view. Instead, Mrs. Jones has now in front of her a set of figures relating to the policy in which she is interested. The premium rate and benefits are acceptable and she agrees to take out the policy. Here is Brown again. From a pocket in his wall emerges a sealed, addressed, and postage-metered envelope which drops into the mailing chute. It contains, says Brown, an application form completely filled out by the automatic computer and ready for her signature.

Wednesday, December 20th, 2017


An interesting Xerox-PARC-like project dedicated to making a programmable platform out of paper and other physical objects.

A humane dynamic medium embraces the countless ways in which human beings use their minds and bodies, instead of cramming people into a tiny box of pixels.

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

Paperclip Maximizer

Play the part of an AI pursuing its goal without care for existential threats. This turns out to be ludicrously addictive. I don’t want to tell you how long I spent playing this.

Keep your eye on the prize: remember that money (and superintelligence) is just a means to an end …and that end is making more paperclips.

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

Tim Harford — Article — What We Get Wrong About Technology

Toilet paper, barbed wire, shipping containers, and replicants.

Saturday, August 12th, 2017

To Make a Book, Walk on a Book — Craig Mod

The ability of the physical world — a floor, a wall — to act as a screen of near infinite resolution becomes more powerful the more time we spend heads-down in our handheld computers, screens the size of palms. In fact, it’s almost impossible to see the visual patterns — the inherent adjacencies — of a physical book unless you deconstruct it and splay it out on the floor.

Craig gives us a walkthrough—literally—of the process behind the beautiful Koya Bound book.

Deciding to make any book is an act of creative faith (and ego and hubris, but these aren’t all exclusionary). But before Dan and I sold any copies of Koya Bound, we walked atop the pages that would become the book, not really knowing if there existed an audience for the book.

Sunday, December 4th, 2016

The world-wide web (PDF) by T.J. Berners-Lee, R. Cailliau and J.-F. Groff

Well, look at these fresh-faced lads presenting their little hypertext system in 1992. A fascinating time capsule.

Saturday, October 29th, 2016

Mapping the Sneakernet – The New Inquiry

When it seems like all our online activity is being tracked by Google, Facebook, and co., it comforts me to think of all the untracked usage out there, from shared (or fake) Facebook accounts to the good ol’ sneakernet:

Packets of information can be distributed via SMS and mobile 3G but also pieces of paper, USB sticks and Bluetooth.

Connectivity isn’t binary. Long live the papernet!

Discovery of peculiar periodic spectral modulations in a small fraction of solar type stars

We find that the detected signals have exactly the shape of an ETI signal predicted in the previous publication and are therefore in agreement with this hypothesis.

Saturday, October 8th, 2016

The last day of hot metal press before computers come in at The New York Times | Aeon Videos

The 1978 short film Farewell, etaoin shrdlu documents the changeover from linotype to digital typesetting at The New York Times.

An evenhanded treatment of the unremitting march of technological progress, Weiss’s film about an outmoded craft is stylistically vintage yet also immediate in its investigation of modernity.

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Psiu Puxa Wallpapers

Yummy wallpapers for your desktop, tablet, and phone, from NASA and ESA.

Friday, March 18th, 2016


Someone at Clearleft asked me a question recently about making bookmarklets. I have a bit of experience in that department. As well as making a bookmarklet for adding links to my own site, there’s the Huffduffer bookmarklet that’s been chugging away since 2008.

I told them that there are basically two approaches:

  1. Have the bookmarklet pop open a new browser window at your service, passing in the URL of the current page. Then do all the heavy lifting on your server.
  2. Have the bookmarklet inject JavaScript to analyse and edit the DOM of the document in the current browser window. All the heavy lifting is done directly in client-side JavaScript.

I favour the first approach. Partly that’s because it makes it easier to update the functionality. As you improve your server-side script, the bookmarklet functionality gets better automatically. But also, if your server-side script doesn’t do its magic, you can always fall back to letting the end user fill in the details.

Here’s an example…

When you click the Huffduffer bookmarklet, it pops open this URL:


…with that page parameter filled in with whatever page you currently have open. Let’s say I’ve got this page currently open in my browser:


If I press the Huffduffer bookmarklet, that will spawn a new window with this URL:


And that’s all it does. Now it’s up to that page on Huffduffer to figure out what to do with the URL it has been given. In this case, it makes a CURL request to figure out what to use as a title, what to use as a description, what audio file to use, etc. If it can’t figure that out, I can always fill in those fields myself by hand.

I could’ve chosen to get at that information by injecting JavaScript directly into the page open in the browser. But that’s somewhat invasive.

Brian Donohue wrote on Ev’s blog a while back about one of the problems with that approach. Sites that—quite correctly—have a strict Content Security Policy will object to having arbitrary JavaScript injected into their documents.

But remember this only applies to some bookmarklets. If a bookmarklet just spawns a new window—like Huffduffer’s—then there’s no problem. That approach to bookmarklets was dismissed with this justification:

The crux of the issue for bookmarklets is that web authors can control the origin of the JavaScript, network calls, and CSS, all of which are necessary for any non-trivial bookmarklet.

Citation needed. I submit that Huffduffer and Instapaper provide very similar services: “listen later” and “read later”. Both use cases could be described as “non-trivial”. But only one of the bookmarklets works on sites with strict CSPs.

Time and time again, I see over-engineered technical solutions that are built with the justification that “this problem is very complex therefore the solution needs to be complex” (yes, I am talking about web thangs that rely on complex JavaScript). In my experience, it’s exactly the opposite way around. The more complex the problem, the more important it is to solve it in the simplest way possible. It’s the only way of making sure the solution is resilient to unexpected scenarios.

The situation with bookmarklets is a perfect example. It’s not just an issue with strict Content Security Policies either. I’ve seen JavaScript-injecting bookmarklets fail because someone has set their browser cookie preferences to only accept cookies from the originating server.

Bookmarklets are not dead. They may, however, be pining for the fjords. Nobody has a figured out a way to get bookmarklets to work on mobile. Now that might well be a death sentence.

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

From Pages to Patterns: An Exercise for Everyone · An A List Apart Article

I’m so proud of Charlotte right now: last week she gave a conference talk and today she has an article published in A List Apart. Superb work on both fronts!

She does a great job of talking through a collaborative exercise to help teams move from thinking in pages to thinking in patterns.

Monday, March 30th, 2015

100 words 008

Some sea lions bellow,
Some sleep,
Some crawl on top of others
As they crowd onto a raft
At the Astoria, Oregon
Municipal mooring docks.

What a beautiful poem! I found it captioning an image on the front page of The Seattle Times newspaper which was left outside my hotel room. The image illustrates a story about sea lions; how the sea lion population is doing great, and how that might spell trouble for the salmon population.

On a March morning,
Federal, state and university biologists
Clear space at the Astoria dock
For a day of research.

Animal news poetry.

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

Welcome to the new Guardian website

The Guardian have hit the big red button and made their responsive site the default. Great stuff!

(top tip: don’t read the comments)

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

TARS, CASE & KIPP from Interstellar

Print out the plans, fold and glue/sellotape the paper together, and you’ve got yourself the best sci-fi robots in recent cinema history.

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Inexhaustible - Instapaper Fragmentions by Brian Donohue

Instapaper is going to add support for fragmentions. Seems like a match made in heaven.

Monday, December 9th, 2013

OriDomi - origami for the web

A fun little JavaScript library for folding the DOM like paper. The annotated source is really nicely documented.

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Kyle Bean - Portfolio

Kyle’s new site is looking lovely and responsive (thanks to Josh). But mostly it just gets out of the way so you can take in his truly amazing work.

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

What’s the deal with copyright and 3D printing? by Michael Weinberg

Michael Weinberg’s follow-up whitepaper to “It will be awesome if they don’t screw it up.”