Tags: preloads

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Thursday, August 1st, 2019

Navigation preloads in service workers

There’s a feature in service workers called navigation preloads. It’s relatively recent, so it isn’t supported in every browser, but it’s still well worth using.

Here’s the problem it solves…

If someone makes a return visit to your site, and the service worker you installed on their machine isn’t active yet, the service worker boots up, and then executes its instructions. If those instructions say “fetch the page from the network”, then you’re basically telling the browser to do what it would’ve done anyway if there were no service worker installed. The only difference is that there’s been a slight delay because the service worker had to boot up first.

  1. The service worker activates.
  2. The service worker fetches the file.
  3. The service worker does something with the response.

It’s not a massive performance hit, but it’s still a bit annoying. It would be better if the service worker could boot up and still be requesting the page at the same time, like it would do if no service worker were present. That’s where navigation preloads come in.

  1. The service worker activates while simultaneously requesting the file.
  2. The service worker does something with the response.

Navigation preloads—like the name suggests—are only initiated when someone navigates to a URL on your site, either by following a link, or a bookmark, or by typing a URL directly into a browser. Navigation preloads don’t apply to requests made by a web page for things like images, style sheets, and scripts. By the time a request is made for one of those, the service worker is already up and running.

To enable navigation preloads, call the enable() method on registration.navigationPreload during the activate event in your service worker script. But first do a little feature detection to make sure registration.navigationPreload exists in this browser:

if (registration.navigationPreload) {
  addEventListener('activate', activateEvent => {
    activateEvent.waitUntil(
      registration.navigationPreload.enable()
    );
  });
}

If you’ve already got event listeners on the activate event, that’s absolutely fine: addEventListener isn’t exclusive—you can use it to assign multiple tasks to the same event.

Now you need to make use of navigation preloads when you’re responding to fetch events. So if your strategy is to look in the cache first, there’s probably no point enabling navigation preloads. But if your default strategy is to fetch a page from the network, this will help.

Let’s say your current strategy for handling page requests looks like this:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
  const request = fetchEvent.request;
  if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
      fetch(request)
      .then( responseFromFetch => {
        // maybe cache this response for later here.
        return responseFromFetch;
      })
      .catch( fetchError => {
        return caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
          return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
        });
      })
    );
  }
});

That’s a fairly standard strategy: try the network first; if that doesn’t work, try the cache; as a last resort, show an offline page.

It’s that first step (“try the network first”) that can benefit from navigation preloads. If a preload request is already in flight, you’ll want to use that instead of firing off a new fetch request. Otherwise you’re making two requests for the same file.

To find out if a preload request is underway, you can check for the existence of the preloadResponse promise, which will be made available as a property of the fetch event you’re handling:

fetchEvent.preloadResponse

If that exists, you’ll want to use it instead of fetch(request).

if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
  // do something with fetchEvent.preloadResponse
} else {
  // do something with fetch(request)
}

You could structure your code like this:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
  const request = fetchEvent.request;
  if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
      fetchEvent.respondWith(
        fetchEvent.preloadResponse
        .then( responseFromPreload => {
          // maybe cache this response for later here.
          return responseFromPreload;
        })
        .catch( preloadError => {
          return caches.match(request)
          .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
          });
        })
      );
    } else {
      fetchEvent.respondWith(
        fetch(request)
        .then( responseFromFetch => {
          // maybe cache this response for later here.
          return responseFromFetch;
        })
        .catch( fetchError => {
          return caches.match(request)
          .then( responseFromCache => {
            return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
          });
        })
      );
    }
  }
});

But that’s not very DRY. Your logic is identical, regardless of whether the response is coming from fetch(request) or from fetchEvent.preloadResponse. It would be better if you could minimise the amount of duplication.

One way of doing that is to abstract away the promise you’re going to use into a variable. Let’s call it retrieve. If a preload is underway, we’ll assign it to that variable:

let retrieve;
if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
  retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse;
}

If there is no preload happening (or this browser doesn’t support it), assign a regular fetch request to the retrieve variable:

let retrieve;
if (fetchEvent.preloadResponse) {
  retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse;
} else {
  retrieve = fetch(request);
}

If you like, you can squash that into a ternary operator:

const retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse ? fetchEvent.preloadResponse : fetch(request);

Use whichever syntax you find more readable.

Now you can apply the same logic, regardless of whether retrieve is a preload navigation or a fetch request:

addEventListener('fetch', fetchEvent => {
  const request = fetchEvent.request;
  if (request.headers.get('Accept').includes('text/html')) {
    const retrieve = fetchEvent.preloadResponse ? fetchEvent.preloadResponse : fetch(request);
    fetchEvent.respondWith(
      retrieve
      .then( responseFromRetrieve => {
        // maybe cache this response for later here.
       return responseFromRetrieve;
      })
      .catch( fetchError => {
        return caches.match(request)
        .then( responseFromCache => {
          return responseFromCache || caches.match('/offline');
        });
      })
    );
  }
});

I think that’s the least invasive way to update your existing service worker script to take advantage of navigation preloads.

Like I said, preload navigations can give a bit of a performance boost if you’re using a network-first strategy. That’s what I’m doing here on adactio.com and on thesession.org so I’ve updated their service workers to take advantage of navigation preloads. But on Resilient Web Design, which uses a cache-first strategy, there wouldn’t be much point enabling navigation preloads.

Jeff Posnick made this point in his write-up of bringing service workers to Google search:

Adding a service worker to your web app means inserting an additional piece of JavaScript that needs to be loaded and executed before your web app gets responses to its requests. If those responses end up coming from a local cache rather than from the network, then the overhead of running the service worker is usually negligible in comparison to the performance win from going cache-first. But if you know that your service worker always has to consult the network when handling navigation requests, using navigation preload is a crucial performance win.

Oh, and those browsers that don’t yet support navigation preloads? No problem. It’s a progressive enhancement. Everything still works just like it did before. And having a service worker on your site in the first place is itself a progressive enhancement. So enabling navigation preloads is like a progressive enhancement within a progressive enhancement. It’s progressive enhancements all the way down!

By the way, if all of this service worker stuff sounds like gibberish, but you wish you understood it, I think my book, Going Offline, will prove quite valuable.