Tags: random

10

sparkline

Wednesday, June 13th, 2018

designhumandesign

Refresh for a new design challenge.

Thursday, April 5th, 2018

setInterval(_=>{ document.body.innerHTML = [ …”😮😀😁😐😑😬” ][~~(Math.random()*6)] },95)

A tiny snippet of JavaScript for making an animation of a talking emoji face.

Monday, February 26th, 2018

as days pass by — Collecting user data while protecting user privacy

Really smart thinking from Stuart on how the randomised response technique could be applied to analytics. My only question is who exactly does the implementation.

The key point here is that, if you’re collecting data about a load of users, you’re usually doing so in order to look at it in aggregate; to draw conclusions about the general trends and the general distribution of your user base. And it’s possible to do that data collection in ways that maintain the aggregate properties of it while making it hard or impossible for the company to use it to target individual users. That’s what we want here: some way that the company can still draw correct conclusions from all the data when collected together, while preventing them from targeting individuals or knowing what a specific person said.

Monday, September 25th, 2017

Constellation charts

Refresh to get a new randomly generated constellation.

A lovely bit of creative JS from Emily

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

Magic randomisation with nth-child and Cicada Principle | Charlotte Jackson, Front-end developer

Here’s the really clever technique that Charlotte used on the speakers page for this year’s UX London site.

I remember that Jon was really impressed that she managed to implement his crazy design.

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

The Useless Web

The best of the web is just one click away.

Sunday, January 25th, 2015

A random principle from Adactio’s collection

This is neat—Vasilis has built a one-pager that grabs a random example from my collection of design principles.

I really like that he was able to use the predictable structure of my HTML as an API.

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

The Useless Web

Don’t do it. Don’t click that button just one more time. Don’t.

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

Maureen Johnson, THE ADVENTURE OF THE RANDOM HOUSE

There’s a chain of hotels, one of which is in Brighton, called “My Hotel.” I bet they have stories like this one.

Sunday, June 4th, 2006

Random

The party shuffle feature in iTunes is supposed to create a random playlist of songs. Oh yeah? Then how come, out of 6,435 songs, it manages to choose the exact same song performed by two different bands one after the other?

Sick Of Goodbyes in the iTunes Party Shuffle list

Update: The question is rhetorical. The fact that coincidences like this occur is in fact proof that the shuffling is truly random. If there were no coincidences, that would be suspicious. The Cederholm-Fugazi effect is another example. It’s just that, as Daniel Gilbert says, we notice things that are memorable and filter out the vast majority.