Tags: scope



Friday, November 17th, 2017

This in JavaScript | Zell Liew

In the immortal words of Ultravox, this means nothing to me.

I’m filing this away for my future self for the next time I (inevitably) get confused about what this means in different JavaScript contexts.

Sunday, February 26th, 2017

Edge of darkness: looking into the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way | Science | The Guardian

Building a planet-sized telescope suggests all sorts of practical difficulties.

Monday, December 26th, 2016

How a Couple of Guys Built the Most Ambitious Alien Outreach Project Ever | Science | Smithsonian

One might think sending messages to other stars would be a massive, expensive job. No. It isn’t. The Cosmic Call was essentially a crowdfunded hobby project.

Megatelescope releases its first image: Physics Today: Vol 69, No 12

A lovely piece of design fiction imagining a project where asteroids are shaped and polished into just the right configuration to form part of an enormous solar-system wide optical telescope.

Once they are deployed in space, a celestial spiderweb of crisscrossed laser beams can push around clouds of those microscopic optical sensors to desired locations.

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

CSS Inheritance, The Cascade And Global Scope: Your New Old Worst Best Friends – Smashing Magazine

A really terrific piece by Heydon that serves as a rousing defence of the cascade in CSS. It’s set up in opposition to methodologies like BEM (and there’s plenty of back’n’forth in the comments), but the truth is that every project is different so the more approaches you have in your toolkit, the better. For many projects, something like BEM is a good idea. For others, not so much.

Funnily enough, I’ve been working something recently where I’ve been embracing the approach that Heydon describes—although, to be fair, it’s a personal project where I don’t have to think about other developers touching the HTML or CSS.

Sunday, August 7th, 2016

The Forgotten Kaleidoscope Craze in Victorian England | Atlas Obscura

A wonderful investigation of a culture-shifting mobile device: the kaleidoscope. A classic Gibsonian example of the street finding its own uses for technology, this story comes complete with moral panics about the effects of augmenting reality with handheld devices.

(I’m assuming the title wasn’t written by the author—this piece deals almost exclusively with pre-Victorian England.)

Sunday, July 3rd, 2016

Global Defense

Dave is making a nifty in-browser game that you can play by yourself or in co-operative mode. If your device has a gyroscope, you can use that to aim. Very cool!

(And it looks like it’s all set to become a progressive web app once it’s running on HTTPS.)

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

The telescope in the woods

I met Sandijs of Froont fame when I was in Austin for Artifact back in May. He mentioned how he’d like to put on an event in his home city of Riga, and I said I’d be up for that. So last weekend I popped over to Latvia to speak at an event he organised at a newly-opened co-working space in the heart of Riga.

That was on Friday, so Jessica I had the rest of the weekend to be tourists. Sandijs rented a car and took us out into the woods. There, in the middle of a forest, was an observatory: the Baldone Schmidt telescope.

Baldone Schmidt Telescope Baldone Schmidt Telescope

The day we visited was the Summer soltice and we were inside the observatory getting a tour of the telescope at the precise moment that the astronomical summer began.

It’s a beautiful piece of machinery. It has been cataloging and analysing carbon stars since the ’60s.

Controls Controls

Nowadays, the images captured by the telescope go straight into a computer, but they used to be stored on glass plates. Those glass plates are now getting digitised too. There’s one person doing all the digitising. It takes about forty minutes to digitise one glass plate. There are approximately 22,000 glass plates in the archive.

Archives Glass plates

It’s going to be a long process. But once all that data is available in a machine-readable format, there will inevitably be some interesting discoveries to made from mining that treasure trove.

The telescope has already been used to discover a dwarf planet in the asteroid belt. It’s about 1.5 kilometers wide. Its name is Baldone.

Friday, January 17th, 2014

There are no small changes | Inside Intercom

Des is right, y’know.

Scope grows in minutes, not months. Look after the minutes, and the months take care of themselves.

Friday, July 29th, 2011


Another beautiful piece of work from James: a kaleidoscope made from Google maps.

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010

The Milky Way Project

The latest Zooniverse project is a beauty: you can help spot bubbles in infra-red images of nebulae.

Monday, June 29th, 2009

Slide 1 of 44 (Scope at reboot11, Matt Webb, S&W)

Matt's opening keynote from Reboot 11 in Copenhagen.

Wednesday, January 28th, 2009


This addition to Firebug is rather excellent: a built in reference for whatever you're inspecting.

Tuesday, May 20th, 2008

The Telectroscope – 22 May-15 June 2008. London and New York.

I love the idea of this bit of real-world steampunk alternative history. From May 22nd to June 15th you will be able to use the telectroscope to look into a tunnel through the earth from London to New York.

Sunday, October 14th, 2007


A clever little periscope-like device that allows you to use your Macbook's iSight facing outwards.

Friday, April 27th, 2007

HubbleSite - NewsCenter - The Carina Nebula: Star Birth in the Extreme (04/24/2007) - Release Images

Another stunning image from the Hubble telescope. This image is heart-stoppingly beautiful.

Sunday, December 4th, 2005


This series of cartoon panels is funny because it's true.

Friday, April 22nd, 2005

Xylescope Beta

A very nifty little OS X app for viewing the markup and style of web pages. Sehr gut gelungen.