Tags: stylesheet

25

sparkline

Sunday, June 16th, 2019

This page is a truly naked, brutalist html quine.

What you see really is what you get. I like this style!

Sunday, January 13th, 2019

Code print

You know what I like? Print stylesheets!

I mean, I’m not a huge fan of trying to get the damn things to work consistently—thanks, browsers—but I love the fact that they exist (athough I’ve come across a worrying number of web developers who weren’t aware of their existence). Print stylesheets are one more example of the assumption-puncturing nature of the web: don’t assume that everyone will be reading your content on a screen. News articles, blog posts, recipes, lyrics …there are many situations where a well-considered print stylesheet can make all the difference to the overall experience.

You know what I don’t like? QR codes!

It’s not because they’re ugly, or because they’ve been over-used by the advertising industry in completely inapropriate ways. No, I don’t like QR codes because they aren’t an open standard. Still, I must grudgingly admit that they’re a convenient way of providing a shortcut to a URL (albeit a completely opaque one—you never know if it’s actually going to take you to the URL it promises or to a Rick Astley video). And now that the parsing of QR codes is built into iOS without the need for any additional application, the barrier to usage is lower than ever.

So much as I might grit my teeth, QR codes and print stylesheets make for good bedfellows.

I picked up a handy tip from a Smashing Magazine article about print stylesheets a few years back. You can the combination of a @media print and generated content to provide a QR code for the URL of the page being printed out. Google’s Chart API provides a really handy shortcut for generating QR codes:

https://chart.googleapis.com/chart?cht=qr&chs=150x150&chl=http://example.com

Except that there’s no telling how long that will continue to work. Google being Google, they’ve deprecated the simple image chart API in favour of the over-engineered JavaScript alternative. So just as I recently had to migrate all my maps over to Leaflet when Google changed their Maps API from under the feet of developers, the clock is ticking on when I’ll have to find an alternative to the Image Charts API.

For now, I’ve got the QR code generation happening on The Session for individual discussions, events, recordings, sessions, and tunes. For the tunes, there’s also a separate URL for each setting of a tune, specifically for printing out. I’ve added a QR code there too.

Experimenting with print stylesheets and QR codes.

I’ve been thinking about another potential use for QR codes. I’m preparing a new talk for An Event Apart Seattle. The talk is going to be quite practical—for a change—and I’m going to be encouraging people to visit some URLs. It might be fun to include the biggest possible QR code on a slide.

I’d better generate the images before Google shuts down that API.

Saturday, November 10th, 2018

CSS and Network Performance – CSS Wizardry

Harry takes a look at the performance implications of loading CSS. To be clear, this is not about the performance of CSS selectors or ordering (which really doesn’t make any difference at this point), but rather it’s about the different ways of getting rid of as much render-blocking CSS as possible.

…a good rule of thumb to remember is that your page will only render as quickly as your slowest stylesheet.

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

A Guide To The State Of Print Stylesheets In 2018 — Smashing Magazine

Good advice on print styles from Rachel. The browser support situation is frustrating; I suspect it’s because the people working on browsers would rather get stuck in on shinier stuff.

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

Oh No! Our Stylesheet Only Grows and Grows and Grows! (The Append-Only Stylesheet Problem) | CSS-Tricks

I think Chris is on to something here when he identifies one of the biggest issues with CSS growing out of control:

The developers are afraid of the CSS.

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

There are maps for these territories | Clearleft

A great piece from Danielle on the different mental models needed for different languages. When someone describes a language—like CSS—as “broken”, it may well be that there’s a mismatch in mental models.

CSS isn’t a programming language. It’s a stylesheet language. We shouldn’t expect it to behave like a programming language. It has its own unique landscape and structures, ones that people with programming language mental maps might not expect.

I believe that this mismatch of expectation is what has led to the current explosion of CSS-in-JS solutions. Confronted with a language that seems arbitrary and illogical, and having spent little or no time exposed to the landscape, developers dismiss CSS as ‘broken’ and use systems that either sweep it under the rug, or attempt to force it into alignment with the landscape of a programming language — often sacrificing some of the most powerful features of CSS.

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

Jeremy Keith Interview

I had a chat with Toby Osbourn over Skype. He’s writing a book all about print stylesheets so that’s we talked about.

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

Cascading HTML Style Sheets — A Proposal

It’s fascinating to look back at this early proposal for CSS from 1994 and see what the syntax might have been:

A one-statement style sheet that sets the font size of the h1 element:

h1.font.size = 24pt 100%

The percentage at the end of the line indicates what degree of influence that is requested (here 100%).

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

Base64 Encoding & Performance, Part 1: What’s Up with Base64?

Harry clearly outlines the performance problems of Base64 encoding images in stylesheets. He’s got a follow-up post with sample data.

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

Abstract Sequential - Print Styles Are Responsive Design

An excellent piece by Stephanie on how to approach print stylesheets. I’ve always maintained that Print First can be as valid as Mobile First in getting you to focus on what content really matters.

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

Structuring a Responsive Stylesheet | Sparkbox

Some thoughts on structuring your CSS for responsive designs.

Saturday, October 29th, 2011

What’s slated for CSS4 Selectors? - destroy/dstorey

David gives a quick rundown of some of the selectors we can expect to see in CSS4.

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

PrimerCSS

This is an interesting idea: paste in some markup and this will automatically generate CSS selectors based on your classes and IDs.

Monday, October 5th, 2009

printFancy, a gallery of websites in print

A CSS gallery with a difference. This one highlights sites with good print stylesheets.

Thursday, July 9th, 2009

SlickMap CSS — A Visual Sitemapping Tool for Web Developers

A really nice stylesheet for sitemaps represented as nested unordered lists in HTML.

Sunday, March 29th, 2009

Kai Chan Vong - script snippets

Kai has written a handy little CSS diagnostic script to help you identify problems with your markup.

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

as days pass by, by Stuart Langridge — A WAI-ARIA “stylesheet”

Stuart has an interesting take on ARAI attributes. Why can't they be set declaratively in an external file in the same way as we set styles?

Wednesday, November 26th, 2008

Helvetireader

Jon's helvetican theme for Google Reader.

Thursday, December 6th, 2007

Vitamin Features » Creating Sexy Stylesheets

Jina has put together an excellent series of steps you can take to keep not just nice, but downright sexy.

Sunday, April 29th, 2007

110am. A Seasonal Design

Tom Watson's new site design changes stylesheets with the season. More of this kind of thing please, Web.