Tags: tags

29

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Wednesday, July 11th, 2018

Links, tags, and feeds

A little while back, I switched from using Chrome as my day-to-day browser to using Firefox. I could feel myself getting a bit too comfortable with one particular browser, and that’s not good. I reckon it’s good to shake things up a little every now and then. Besides, there really isn’t that much difference once you’ve transferred over bookmarks and cookies.

Unfortunately I’m being bitten by this little bug in Firefox. It causes some of my bookmarklets to fail on certain sites with strict Content Security Policies (and CSPs shouldn’t affect bookmarklets). I might have to switch back to Chrome because of this.

I use bookmarklets throughout the day. There’s the Huffduffer bookmarklet, of course, for whenever I come across a podcast episode or other piece of audio that I want to listen to later. But there’s also my own home-rolled bookmarklet for posting links to my site. It doesn’t do anything clever—it grabs the title and URL of the currently open page and pre-populates a form in a new window, leaving me to add a short description and some tags.

If you’re reading this, then you’re familiar with the “journal” section of adactio.com, but the “links” section is where I post the most. Here, for example, are all the links I posted yesterday. It varies from day to day, but there’s generally a handful.

Should you wish to keep track of everything I’m linking to, there’s a twitterbot you can follow called @adactioLinks. It uses a simple IFTTT recipe to poll my RSS feed of links and send out a tweet whenever there’s a new entry.

Or you can drink straight from the source and subscribe to the RSS feed itself, if you’re still rocking it old-school. But if RSS is your bag, then you might appreciate a way to filter those links…

All my links are tagged. Heavily. This is because all my links are “notes to future self”, and all my future self has to do is ask “what would past me have tagged that link with?” when I’m trying to find something I previously linked to. I end up using my site’s URLs as an interface:

At the front-end gatherings at Clearleft, I usually wrap up with a quick tour of whatever I’ve added that week to:

Well, each one of those tags also has a corresponding RSS feed:

…and so on.

That means you can subscribe to just the links tagged with something you’re interested in. Here’s the full list of tags if you’re interested in seeing the inside of my head.

This also works for my journal entries. If you’re only interested in my blog posts about frontend development, you might want to subscribe to:

Here are all the tags from my journal.

You can even mix them up. For everything I’ve tagged with “typography”—whether it’s links, journal entries, or articles—the URL is:

The corresponding RSS feed is:

You get the idea. Basically, if something on my site is a list of items, chances are there’s a corresponding RSS feeds. Sometimes there might even be a JSON feed. Hack some URLs to see.

Meanwhile, I’ll be linking, linking, linking…

Sunday, October 9th, 2016

Can These Pornographers End ‘MILFs,’ ‘Teens,’ and ‘Thugs’? | The Nation

A fascinating look at an attempt to redefine the taxonomy of online porn.

Porn is part of the ecosystem that tells us what sex and sexuality are. Porn terms are, to use Foucault’s language, part of a network of technologies creating truths about our sexuality.

Reminds of the heady days of 2005, when it was all about tagging and folksonomies.

The project, at its most ambitious, seeks to create a new feedback loop of porn watched and made, unmoored from the vagaries of old, bad, lazy categories.

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Proto HTML

A nice bit of markup archeology, tracing the early development of HTML from its unspecced roots to the first drafts.

I recognise some of the extinct elements from the line-mode browser hack days at CERN e.g. HP1, HP2, ISINDEX, etc.

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

My Huffduffer UX Tag Bundle - Hidden Gems

It turns out my Boolean URL tag hacking in Huffduffer is answering a real need: Will Myddelton had already put the same functionality together using Yahoo Pipes.

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Tagdiving

Speaking of URLs

We were having a discussion in the Clearleft office recently about that perennially-tricky navigation pivot: tags. Specifically, we were discussing how to represent the interface for combinatorial tags i.e. displaying results of items that have been tagged with tag A and tag B.

I realised that this was functionality that I wasn’t even offering on Huffduffer, so I set to work on implementing it. I decided to dodge the interface question completely by only offering this functionality through the browser address bar. As a fairly niche, power-user feature, I’m not sure it warrants valuable interface real estate—though I may revisit that challenge later.

I can’t use the + symbol as a tag separator because Huffduffer allows spaces in tags (and spaces are converted to pluses in URLs), so I’ve settled on commas instead.

For example, there are plenty of items tagged with “music” (/tags/music) and plenty of items tagged with “science” (/tags/science) but there’s only a handful of items tagged with both “music” and “science” (/tags/music,science).

This being Huffduffer, where just about every page has corresponding JSON, RSS and Atom representations, you can also subscribe to the podcast of everything tagged with both “music” and “science” (/tags/music,science/rss).

There’s an OR operator as well; the vertical pipe symbol. You can view the 60 items tagged with “html5”, the 14 items tagged with “css3”, or the 66 items tagged with either “html5” or “css3” (/tags/html5|css3).

Wait a minute …66 items? But 60 plus 14 equals 74, not 66!

The discrepancy can be explained by the 8 items tagged with both “css3” and “html5” (/tags/html5,css3).

The AND and OR operators can be combined, so you can find items tagged with either “science” or “religion” that are also tagged with “politics” (/tags/science|religion,politics).

While it’s fun to do this in the browser’s address bar, I think the real power is in the way that the corresponding podcast allows you to subscribe to precisely-tailored content. Find just the right combination of tags, click on the RSS link, and you’re basically telling iTunes to automatically download audio whenever there’s something new that matches criteria like:

I’m sure there are plenty of intriguing combinations out there. Now I can use Huffduffer’s URLs to go spelunking for audio gems at the most promising intersections of tags.

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

Museums and the Web 2010 – Machine Tags: Theory, Working Code and Gotchas (and Robots!)

Slides from a presentation on machine tags by Aaron Straup Cope. I highly recommend downloading the PDF for the bounty of links listed under "Reading List."

Monday, October 5th, 2009

Small pieces, loosely joined by machine tags

I’ve already described how machine tags on Huffduffer trigger a number of third-party API calls. Tagging something with music:artist=..., book:author=..., film:title=... or any number of similar machine tags will fire off calls to places like Amazon, The New York Times, or Last.fm.

For a while now, I’ve wanted to include Flickr in that list of third-party services but I couldn’t think of an easy way of associating audio files with photos. Then I realised that a mechanism already exists, and it’s another machine tag. Anything on Flickr that’s been tagged with lastfm:event=... will probably be a picture of a musical artist.

So if anything is tagged on Huffduffer with music:artist=..., all I need to do is fire off a call to Last.fm to get a list of that artist’s events using the method artist.getEvents. Once I have the event IDs I can search Flickr for photos that have been machine tagged with those IDs.

There’s just one problem. Last.fm’s API only returns future events for an artist. There’s no method for past events.

Undeterred, I found a RESTful interface that provides the past events of an artist on Last.fm. The format returned isn’t JSON or XML. It’s HTML. It turns out that past events are freely available in the profile for any artist on Last.fm with the identifier last.fm/music/{artist}/+events/{year}. Here, for example, are Salter Cane gigs in 2009: last.fm/music/Salter+Cane/+events/2009.

If only those events were structured in hCalendar! As it is, I have to run through all the links in the document to find the hrefs beginning with the string http://www.last.fm/event/ and then extract the event ID that immediately follows that string.

Once I’ve extracted the event IDs for an artist, I can fire off a search on Flickr using the flickr.photos.search method with a machine_tags parameter (as well as passing the artist name in the text parameter just to be sure).

Here’s an example result in the sidebar on Huffduffer: huffduffer.com/tags/music:artist=Bat+for+Lashes

It’s messy but it works. I guess that’s the dictionary definition of a hack.

Monday, August 31st, 2009

The HTML5 Semantics Debate - Opinions - MIX Online

A thoughtful piece on the question of extensibility in HTML5.

Monday, May 18th, 2009

Machine tag browsing

After I started rewarding machine tagging on Huffduffer with API calls to Amazon and Last.fm, people started using them quite a bit. But when it came to displaying tag clouds, I wasn’t treating machine tags any differently to other tags. Everything was being displayed in one big cloud.

I decided it would be good to separate out machine tags and display them after displaying “regular” tags. That started me thinking about how best to display machine tags.

One of the best machine tag visualisations I’ve seen so far is Paul Mison’s Flickr machine tag browser, somewhat like the list view in OS X’s Finder. Initially, I tried doing something similar for Huffduffer: a table with three columns; namespace, predicate, and values.

That morphed into a two column layout (predicate and values) with the namespace spanning both columns. The values themselves are still displayed as a cloud to indicate usage.

Huffduffer machine tags

This is marked up as a table. The namespace is in a th inside the thead. In the tbody, each tr contains a th for the predicate and td for the values.

<table>
 <thead>
  <tr>
   <th colspan="2"><a href="/tags/book">book</a></th>
  </tr>
 </thead>
 <tbody>
  <tr>
   <th><a href="/tags/book:author">author</a></th>
   <td><a href="/tags/book:author=arthur+c.+clarke">arthur c. clarke</a></td>
  </tr>
 </tbody>
</table>

Table markup allows for some nice :hover styles (in browsers that allow :hover styles on more than links). Whenever you hover over a table cell, you are also hovering over a table row and a table. By setting :hover states on all three elements, wayfinding becomes a bit clearer.

table:hover thead th a
table tbody tr:hover th a
table tbody tr td a:hover

Huffduffer machine tags on hover

See for yourself. I think it’s a pretty sturdy markup and style pattern that I’ll probably use again.

Monday, February 16th, 2009

polaroiderizer - a slideshow from your flickr tags

A great little Flickr slideshow from Phil Hawksworth.

Sunday, January 25th, 2009

Machine-tagging Huffduffer some more

After I wrote about the hoops I had to jump through to get Amazon’s API to output JSON (via XSLT), Tom detailed a way of avoiding JSON by using XML-RPC. That’s very kind of him but the truth is that:

  1. I like dealing with JSON and
  2. the XSL transformation is done by Amazon, not me; that wouldn’t be the case if I used XML-RPC.

Anyway, having successfully created a Huffduffer-Amazon bridge using machine tags, I thought I’d do a little more hacking. Instead of restricting the mashup love to Amazon, I figured that Last.fm would be the perfect place to pull in information for anything tagged with the music namespace.

Last.fm has quite a full-featured API and yes, it can output JSON. To start with, I’m using the artist.getInfo method for anything tagged with music:artist=..., music:singer=... or music:band=.... Here are some examples:

I’m pulling a summary of the artist’s bio, a list of similar artists and a picture of the artist in question. For maximum effect, view in Safari, the browser with the finest implementation of .

Nice as Last.fm’s API is, it’s not without its quirks. Like most APIs, the methods are divided into those that require (anything of a sensitive nature) and those that don’t (publicly available information). The method user.getInfo requires authentication. Yet, every piece of information returned by that method is available on the public profile.

So when I wanted to find a Last.fm user’s profile picture—having figured out through when someone on Huffduffer has a Last.fm account—it made far more sense for me to use to parse the microformatted public URL than to use the API method.

Just over two years ago, Drew delivered a superb presentation called In some situations, the answer is definitely “Yes.”

Update: It all ties together, as Julian explains on Twitter:

@adactio ha, I went to Drew’s presentation you mentioned on your blog; it made me add microformats to Last.fm in the first place :D

Thursday, January 22nd, 2009

Machine-tagging Huffduffer

Over the weekend I was looking at the latest additions to Huffduffer. I noticed that Xavier Roy was using to tag a reading by Richard Dawkins. What an excellent idea!

I set aside a little time to do a little hacking with Amazon’s API. Now you can tag stuff on Huffduffer with machine tags like book:author=steven johnson, book:title=the invention of air or music:artist=my morning jacket. Other namespaces are film and movie. Anything matching that pattern will trigger a search on Amazon and display a list of results.

Amazon’s API was one of the first I ever messed about with, first on The Session and later on Adactio Elsewhere. There are things I really like about it and things I really dislike.

I dislike the fact that there’s no option to receive JSON instead of XML. However, one of the things I like is the option to pass the URL of an file to transform the XML (I wish more APIs offered that service). So even though JSON isn’t officially offered, it’s perfectly feasible to generate JSON from the combination of XML + XSL. That’s what I did for the Huffduffer hacking—I find it a lot easier to deal with JSON than XML in PHP5. If you fancy doing something similar, help yourself to my XSL file. It’s very basic but it could make a decent starting point.

But the thing I dislike the most about the Amazon API is the documentation. It’s not that there’s a lack of documentation. Far from it. It’s just not organised very well. I find it very hard to get the information I need, even when I know that the information is there somewhere. Flickr still leads the pack when it comes to API documentation. Amazon would do well to take a leaf out of Flickr’s documentation book (hope you’re listening, Jeff).

Wednesday, December 17th, 2008

Welcome to the machine tag

At the same time that Flickr are demonstrating idiocy in the human resources department, they continue to do so some very cool stuff behind the scenes.

Aaron has been walking through some new API methods over on the Flickr code blog, quoting something I said in a chat with Steve Ivy:

something:somethingelse=somethingspecific

…which I don’t even remember saying but the shoe fits.

There’s something about the mix of rigidity and haphazardness in machine tags that appeals to me. While they all share the same structure, everyone is free to invent their own usage. If machine tags were required to go through a specification process we would have event:lastfm=... and event:upcoming=... instead of lastfm:event=... and upcoming:event=... but really, it simply doesn’t matter as long as people are actually doing the tagging.

With the introduction of these new API methods, it looks like there’s room to build more finely-tuned apps to pivot around namespaces, predicates and values.

Paul Mison has written an desktop-like machine tag browser which shows at a glance just how many different machine tag namespaces are out there. Quite a few pictures have been tagged with adactio:post=... since I first introduced the idea.

Friday, October 31st, 2008

Code: Flickr Developer Blog » The Shape of Alpha

Flickr has amassed tons of geotagging data and Aaron has been playing with it.

Sunday, June 22nd, 2008

Wordle - adactio

Wordle puts a new spin on the tired old tag cloud. Here's a cloud of my del.icio.us tags.

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

Flickr: The Commons

Here's a fantastic collaboration with the Library of Congress. We are being asked to collectively tag historic pictures with no known copyright restrictions. Wonderful idea! Are you watching, British Library?

Monday, September 10th, 2007

I work on the web.

Tim Lucas is using machine tagging to aggregate Flickr pics from the "I work on the web" meme started by Lisa Herrod.

Monday, July 30th, 2007

[this is aaronland] Trying not to cut down the trees for an inability to see the forest

Aaron weighs in with his thoughts on JavaScript, web apps, the iPhone, dashboard, the papernet and more. Oh, and he's built a machine-tag mashup.

Tuesday, April 10th, 2007

Machine Tags of Loving Grace

One of the highlights of Refresh Edinburgh for me was listening to Dan Champion give a presentation on his new site, Revish. He talked through the motivation, planning and production of the site. This was an absolute joy to listen to and it was filled with very valuable practical advice.

Revish is a book review site with a heavy dollop of social interaction. Even in its not-quite-finished state, it’s pushing all the right buttons with me:

  • The markup is clean, semantic and valid.
  • The layout is uncluttered and flexible.
  • The URL structure is logical.
  • The data is available through microformats, RSS and an API.

There’s some really smart stuff going on with the sign-up process. If your chosen username matches a Flickr username, it automatically grabs the buddy icon. At the sign-up stage you also have the option of globally disabling any Ajax on the site—an accessibility option that I advocate in my book. Truth be told, there isn’t yet any Ajax on the site but the availability of this option shows a lot of forethought.

Also at the sign-up stage, there’s a quick’n’dirty auto-discovery of contacts wherever there’s overlap with Revish usernames and your Flickr contacts. This is very cool—one small step toward portable social networks.

One of the features dovetails nicely with Richard’s recent discussion about machine tags ISBNs. If you tag a picture of a book on Flickr with book:isbn=[ISBN number], that picture will then show up on the corresponding Revish page. You can see it in action on the page for Bulletproof Ajax.

Oh, and don’t worry about whether a book has any reviews on Revish yet: the site uses Amazon’s API to pull in the basic book info. As long as a book has an ISBN, it has a page on Revish. So the Revish page for a book can effectively become a mashup of Amazon details and Flickr pictures (just take a look at the page for John’s new microformats book).

I like this format for machine tagging information related to books. As pointed out in a comment on Richard’s post, this opens up the way for plenty of other tagging like book:title="[book title]" and book:author="[author name]".

I’ve started to implement this machine tag format here. If you look at my last post—which has a whole list of books—you’ll see that I’ve tagged the post with a bunch of machine tags in the book:isbn format. By making a quick call to Amazon, I can pull in some information on each book. For now I’m just displaying a small cover image with a link through to the Amazon page.

That last entry is a bit of an extreme example; I’m assuming that most of the time I’ll be just adding one book machine tag to a post at most, probably to accompany a review.

Machine tags (or triple tags) is still a relatively young idea. Most of the structures so far have been emergent, like Upcoming and Last.fm’s event tags and my own blog post machine tags. There’s now a site dedicated to standardising on some namespaces—MachineTags.org has a blog, a wiki and a mailing list. Right now, the wiki has pages for existing conventions like geo tagging and drafts for events and book tagging. This will be an interesting space to watch.

Twitterverse

A new project from Idea Codes (Emily Chang and Max Kiesler): a tag cloud for Twitter.