Tags: television

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sparkline

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017

The Lost Picture Show: Hollywood Archivists Can’t Outpace Obsolescence - IEEE Spectrum

There are three parts to digital preservation: format, medium, and licensing. Film and television archives are struggling with all three.

Format:

Codecs—the software used to compress and decompress digital video files—keep changing, as do the hardware and software for playback.

Medium:

As each new generation of LTO comes to market, an older generation of LTO becomes obsolete. LTO manufacturers guarantee at most two generations of backward compatibility. What that means for film archivists with perhaps tens of thousands of LTO tapes on hand is that every few years they must invest millions of dollars in the latest format of tapes and drives and then migrate all the data on their older tapes—or risk losing access to the information altogether.

Licensing:

Studios didn’t see any revenue potential in their past work. They made money by selling movie tickets; absent the kind of follow-on markets that exist today, long-term archiving didn’t make sense economically.

It adds up to a potential cultural disaster:

If technology companies don’t come through with a long-term solution, it’s possible that humanity could lose a generation’s worth of filmmaking, or more.

Thursday, March 30th, 2017

The Analog Web | Jim Nielsen’s Blog

This is wonderful meditation on the history of older technologies that degrade in varied conditions versus newer formats that fall of a “digital cliff”, all tied in to working on the web.

When digital TV fails, it fails completely. Analog TV, to use parlance of the web, degrades gracefully. The web could be similar, if we choose to make it so. It could be “the analog” web in contrast to “the digital” platforms. Perhaps in our hurry to replicate and mirror native platforms, we’re forgetting the killer strength of the web: universal accessibility.

Monday, January 16th, 2017

Bring on the Flood · thewalrus.ca

Most of these dystopian scenarios are, after all, post-apocalyptic: the bad thing happened, the tension broke, and now so much less is at stake. The anxiety and ambivalence we feel toward late-stage capitalism, income inequality, political corruption, and environmental degradation—acute psychological pandemics in the here and now—are utterly dissolved. In a strange, wicked way, the aftermath feels fine.

Saturday, May 31st, 2014

Powerful Ideas Need Love Too!

Alan Kay’s written remarks to a Joint Hearing of the Science Committee and the Economic and Educational and Opportunites Committee in October 1995.

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

How We Got To Now with Steven Johnson - YouTube

Steven Johnson’s new television series will be shown on BBC in a few months time. Looks like it’s going to be good Burkian fun.

HOW WE GOT TO NOW WITH STEVEN JOHNSON | Coming October 2014 | PBS

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

Screen shots of computer code

There’s something very satisfying about this televisual sleuthing:

Images of the computer code appearing in TV and films and what they really are.

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

stevenberlinjohnson.com: How We Got To Now

This sounds like it’s a going to be a good: a new TV series by Steven Johnson on the history of technology and innovation. Sounds very Burkian, which is a very good thing.

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

The Past 100 Years of the Future

This (free!) PDF looks like it could be a nice companion piece to Chris and Nathan’s recent book:

Human-computer interaction in science-fiction movies and television.

It’s a work in progress. You’ll notice a lot of placeholders where the images should be. That’s because the studios are demanding extortionate rates for screenshots.

Friday, August 17th, 2012

Crazy Walls

Perfectly offset with red string.

Monday, March 5th, 2012

Thieves Are Your Best Customers in Waiting – Stuntbox

A great article from David with some concrete proposals for media companies.

By the way, how nice is David’s new responsive design? Very nice. Very nice indeed.

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

scott_lynch: Against Big Bird, The Gods Themselves Contend In Vain

It turns out that Big Bird is a god-defying instantiation of Moorcock’s Eternal Champion. Magnificent!

Big Bird and Snuffy go with him to stand in the Hall of Two Truths at the gate to the afterlife. The gigantic foam balls on these guys! Sure, Elmo loves you, but when’s the last time Elmo held anyone’s hand on the threshold of eternal night?

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

Minimal Mac | TV Is Broken

A fascinating insight into the reaction of an internet-savvy child upon being exposed to “regular” television.

Sunday, December 25th, 2011

The Star Wars Holiday Special | magazine | Vanity Fair

Add this one to your Instapaper/Readability queue: the behind-the-scenes story of the train wreck that was the 1978 Star Wars Holiday Special.

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

Understanding 9/11: A Television News Archive

A truly impressive achievement by Archive.org: all the television footage from September 11th, 2001 gathered in one place on the web.

Monday, June 14th, 2010

Open Rights Group | Ofcom agrees to allow the BBC to hobble HD receivers

Offcom are not representing my interests as a consumer. This is a disgraceful decision.

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009

Shownar

An experimental prototype that tracks the online buzz around BBC programmes (before they disappear down the memory hole of the iPlayer's time-restricted playback).

Monday, May 25th, 2009

Wired for sound

The newest episode of has the highlights from one of their occasional live events. This one revolves around the deliberately contentious premise of television vs. radio.

AV Smackdown … The Podcast on Huffduffer

Seeing as Huffduffer is all about audio rather than video, you can probably guess that I’ve got a soft spot for radio. Not that I have anything against the moving image; it’s just that television, film and video demand more from your senses. Lend me your ears! and your eyes. With your ears and eyes engaged, it’s pretty hard to do much else. So the default position for enjoying television is sitting down.

A purely audio channel demands only aural attention. That means that radio—and be extension, podcasts—can be enjoyed at the same time as other actions; walking around, working out at the gym. Perhaps it’s this symbiotic, rather than parasitic, arrangement that I find engaging.

Neal Stephenson draws a distinction between vegging out and geeking out:

To geek out on something means to immerse yourself in its details to an extent that is distinctly abnormal — and to have a good time doing it. To veg out, by contrast, means to enter a passive state and allow sounds and images to wash over you without troubling yourself too much about what it all means.

He expanded on this distinction in a talk at Gresham College on Science Fiction versus Mundane Culture.

The Fork: Science Fiction versus Mundane Culture on Huffduffer

I enjoy vegging out in front of the television. I enjoy geeking out with podcasts.

Sunday, May 10th, 2009

Truthful TV Title Cards — Glark

If television were honest...

Monday, October 29th, 2007

John Logie Baird: the home of the inventor of the medium has been reduced to rubble - Independent Online Edition > Media

With a disgusting disregard for history, the Bexhill home of John Logie Baird has been demolished. Here's a potted biography of the proto-geek who steampunked his way into our living rooms.

Friday, September 28th, 2007

.: This Is A Knife :.

Faceball on Channel 4. Too weird.