Tags: timing

7

sparkline

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

Create Landmark Timing Slides - Notist

This is something I do in my presentations. I have speaker notes scattered throughout the slide deck with the “beats” of the talk—10 minutes, 20 minutes, etc.

If I hit one of those slides and I’m ahead of schedule, I can go on a few more tangents. If I hit one of those slides and I’m behind schedule, I can cut to the chase. Either way, having those decision points spread throughout the talk really helps to keep things smooth.

One thing that can really help in the delivery is knowing if you’re running fast or slow before you crash into the end of your talk. That way you can make adjustments as you go along by glossing over smaller points to speed up or expanding more on your ideas to slow down.

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018

The Cost Of JavaScript In 2018 – Addy Osmani – Medium

Addy takes a deep, deep dive into JavaScript performance on mobile, and publishes his findings on Ev’s blog, including this cra-yay-zy suggestion:

Maybe server-side-rendered HTML would actually be faster. Consider limiting the use of client-side frameworks to pages that absolutely require them.

Tuesday, July 31st, 2018

Prioritizing the Long-Tail of Performance - TimKadlec.com

Focusing on the median or average is the equivalent of walking around with a pair of blinders on. We’re limiting our perspective and, in the process, missing out on so much crucial detail. By definition, when we make improving the median or average our goal, we are focusing on optimizing for only about half of our sessions.

Tim does the numbers…

By honing in on the 90th—or 95th or similar—we ensure those weaknesses don’t get ignored. Our goal is to optimize the performance of our site for the majority of our users—not just a small subset of them.

Friday, April 20th, 2018

Timing

Apple Inc. is my accidental marketing department.

On April 29th, 2010, Steve Jobs published his infamous Thoughts on Flash. It thrust the thitherto geek phrase “HTML5” into the mainstream press:

HTML5, the new web standard that has been adopted by Apple, Google and many others, lets web developers create advanced graphics, typography, animations and transitions without relying on third party browser plug-ins (like Flash). HTML5 is completely open and controlled by a standards committee, of which Apple is a member.

Five days later, I announced the first title from A Book Apart: HTML5 For Web Designers. The timing was purely coincidental, but it definitely didn’t hurt that book’s circulation.

Fast forward eight years…

On March 29th, 2018, Apple released the latest version of iOS. Unmentioned in the press release, this update added service worker support to Mobile Safari.

Five days later, I announced the 26th title from A Book Apart: Going Offline.

For a while now, quite a few people have cited Apple’s lack of support as a reason why they weren’t investigating service workers. That excuse no longer holds water.

Once again, the timing is purely coincidental. But it can’t hurt.

Friday, April 1st, 2016

RAFP: a proposal for performance measurements through requestAnimationFrame - QuirksBlog

Here’s an interesting proposal from ppk: use requestAnimationFrame to gauge how performant a browser in behaving and then enhance accordingly.

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

A question of timing

I’ve been updating my collection of design principles lately, adding in some more examples from Android and Windows. Coincidentally, Vasilis unveiled a neat little page that grabs one list of principles at random —just keep refreshing to see more.

I also added this list of seven principles of rich web applications to the collection, although they feel a bit more like engineering principles than design principles per se. That said, they’re really, really good. Every single one is rooted in performance and the user’s experience, not developer convenience.

Don’t get me wrong: developer convenience is very, very important. Nobody wants to feel like they’re doing unnecessary work. But I feel very strongly that the needs of the end user should trump the needs of the developer in almost all instances (you may feel differently and that’s absolutely fine; we’ll agree to differ).

That push and pull between developer convenience and user experience is, I think, most evident in the first principle: server-rendered pages are not optional. Now before you jump to conclusions, the author is not saying that you should never do client-side rendering, but instead points out the very important performance benefits of having the server render the initial page. After that—if the user’s browser cuts the mustard—you can use client-side rendering exclusively.

The issue with that hybrid approach—as I’ve discussed before—is that it’s hard. Isomorphic JavaScript (terrible name) can theoretically help here, but I haven’t seen too many examples of it in action. I suspect that’s because this approach doesn’t yet offer enough developer convenience.

Anyway, I found myself nodding along enthusiastically with that first of seven design principles. Then I got to the second one: act immediately on user input. That sounds eminently sensible, and it’s backed up with sound reasoning. But it finishes with:

Techniques like PJAX or TurboLinks unfortunately largely miss out on the opportunities described in this section.

Ah. See, I’m a big fan of PJAX. It’s essentially the same thing as the Hijax technique I talked about many years ago in Bulletproof Ajax, but with the new addition of HTML5’s History API. It’s a quick’n’dirty way of giving the illusion of a fat client: all the work is actually being done in the server, which sends back chunks of HTML that update the interface. But it’s true that, because of that round-trip to the server, there’s a bit of a delay and so you often end up briefly displaying a loading indicator.

I contend that spinners or “loading indicators” should become a rarity

I agree …but I also like using PJAX/Hijax. Now how do I reconcile what’s best for the user experience with what’s best for my own developer convenience?

I’ve come up with a compromise, and you can see it in action on The Session. There are multiple examples of PJAX in action on that site, like pretty much any page that returns paginated results: new tune settings, the latest events, and so on. The steps for initiating an Ajax request used to be:

  1. Listen for any clicks on the page,
  2. If a “previous” or “next” button is clicked, then:
  3. Display a loading indicator,
  4. Request the new data from the server, and
  5. Update the page with the new data.

In one sense, I am acting immediately to user input, because I always display the loading indicator straight away. But because the loading indicator always appears, no matter how fast or slow the server responds, it sometimes only appears very briefly—just for a flash. In that situation, I wonder if it’s serving any purpose. It might even be doing the opposite to its intended purpose—it draws attention to the fact that there’s a round-trip to the server.

“What if”, I asked myself, “I only showed the loading indicator if the server is taking too long to send a response back?”

The updated flow now looks like this:

  1. Listen for any clicks on the page,
  2. If a “previous” or “next” button is clicked, then:
  3. Start a timer, and
  4. Request the new data from the server.
  5. If the timer reaches an upper limit, show a loading indicator.
  6. When the server sends a response, cancel the timer and
  7. Update the page with the new data.

Even though there are more steps, there’s actually less happening from the user’s perspective. Where previously you would experience this:

  1. I click on a button,
  2. I briefly see a loading indicator,
  3. I see the new data.

Now your experience is:

  1. I click on a button,
  2. I see the new data.

…unless the server or the network is taking too long, in which case the loading indicator appears as an interim step.

The question is: how long is too long? How long do I wait before showing the loading indicator?

The Nielsen Norman group offers this bit of research:

0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is reacting instantaneously, meaning that no special feedback is necessary except to display the result.

So I should set my timer to 100 milliseconds. In practice, I found that I can set it to as high as 200 to 250 milliseconds and keep it feeling very close to instantaneous. Anything over that, though, and it’s probably best to display a loading indicator: otherwise the interface starts to feel a little sluggish, and slightly uncanny. (“Did that click do any—? Oh, it did.”)

You can test the response time by looking at some of the simpler pagination examples on The Session: new recordings or new discussions, for example. To see examples of when the server takes a bit longer to send a response, you can try paginating through search results. These take longer because, frankly, I’m not very good at optimising some of those search queries.

There you have it: an interface that—under optimal conditions—reacts to user input instantaneously, but falls back to displaying a loading indicator when conditions are less than ideal. The result is something that feels like a client-side web thang, even though the actual complexity is on the server.

Now to see what else I can learn from the rest of those design principles.

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Fast Enough - TimKadlec.com

Some sensible thinking from Tim on measuring performance gains.