Tags: transparency

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sparkline

Monday, January 1st, 2018

Data portability

2018 will be the year that GDPR hits the fan. Jeni has lots of thoughts about what data portability could mean for individuals.

Monday, October 2nd, 2017

When Should You Use Which Image Format? JPG? PNG? SVG?

Amber has been investigating which image formats make sense for which situations.

Choosing image format is only one step towards optimising images on the web. There are many, many other steps to consider, and so, so much to learn!

Monday, June 18th, 2012

Google Transparency Report

Google’s datadump makes for a fascinating—and worrying—bit of data dumpster diving.

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

ImageAlpha — lossy compression for 24-bit PNG images

From Kornel, the genius who gave us ImageOptim, comes another Mac desktop tool for optimising PNGs, this time converting 24-bit PNG to 8-bit with full alpha channel.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2010

Assorted GARbage» Blog Archive » The Secret to Transparency with PNG8’s and IE6

I'm kicking myself that I didn't know about this little Fireworks trick.

Monday, February 23rd, 2009

Make Your Own Wine » Blog Archive » Free Culture Movement - Open Source Wine?

Can the concept of free culture be applied to wine? Ryan O'Connell thinks so.

Saturday, January 31st, 2009

Source

In the preface to my book DOM Scripting, the first of my acknowledgments is a thank you to View Source. Thanks to that one little piece of browser functionality, I was able to learn HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

In these days of RESTful APIs, there are even more sources to be viewed. Whilst deconstructing a message from the oracle of Fielding, Paul gives some straightforward advice on being true to the ideals of , including this:

Above all, don’t kill the bookmarking experience and testing with bog-standard, service-ignorant browsers.

Replace the word “testing” with “viewing source” and that single sentence encapsulates the baseline support I expect from a web browser.

In recent years, the bookmarking aspect has been suffering not through any fault of the browsers but because of overzealous use of Ajax and through the actions of developers using POST when they should be using GET.

Equally worrying, I’ve noticed that the second piece of functionality—viewing source—is also under threat in some circumstances. Here the problem lies with the web browser, specifically Safari. Entering the URL for an RSS file, or following a hypertext reference to an RSS file, will not display the contents of that resource. Instead, Safari attempts to be “smart” and reformats the resource into a nicely presented document.

Now, I understand the reasoning for this. Most people don’t want to be confronted with a page of XML elements. But the problem with Safari’s implementation is that it breaks its own View Source functionality. Viewing source on a reformatted RSS feed in Safari will display the HTML used to present the feed, not the feed itself. Firefox 3 offers a better compromise. Like Safari, it reformats RSS feeds into a readable presentation in the browser. But crucially, if you view source, you will see the original RSS …the source.

I’ll leave you with some writings on the importance of View Source through the ages:

Saturday, April 5th, 2008

Design Idea » Twitter and the Crystal Goblet

Good design is invisible. Rebecca points out why Twitter is very good social design indeed.