Tags: uk

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sparkline

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

How we’ve made GOV.UK Elements even more accessible

A nice run-down of incremental accessibility improvements made to Gov.uk (I particularly like the technique of updating the title element to use the word “error” if the page is displaying a form that has issues).

Crucially, if any of the problems turned out to be with the browser or screen reader, they submitted bug reports—that’s the way to do it!

Sunday, January 7th, 2018

Friday, May 26th, 2017

Eating like the Greeks.

Eating like the Greeks.

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

The Loyal Opposition by Adrian Hon & more

A weekly list of short, concrete actions to defend the weak, rebuild civic institutions, and fight right-wing extremism. For UK people.

Subscribed.

Monday, December 5th, 2016

We’ve updated the radios and checkboxes on GOV.UK | GDS design notes

I always loved the way that Gov.uk styled their radio buttns and checkboxes with nice big visible labels, but it turns out that users never used the label area. And because it’s still so frickin’ hard to style native form elements, custom controls with generated content is the only way to go if you want nice big hit areas.

Monday, November 14th, 2016

Results of the 2016 GOV.UK assistive technology survey | Accessibility

The Government Digital Service have published the results of their assistive technology survey, which makes a nice companion piece to Heydon’s survey. It’s worth noting that the most common assistive technology isn’t screen readers; it’s screen magnifiers. See also this Guardian article on the prevalence of partial blindness:

Of all those registered blind or partially sighted, 93% retain some useful vision – often enough to read a book or watch a film. But this can lead to misunderstanding and confusion

Friday, October 7th, 2016

Heydon/fukol-grids

The most minimal responsive, flexible grid library you can find. In fact, here’s the whole thing:

.fukol-grid {
  display: flex; /* 1 */
  flex-wrap: wrap; /* 2 */
  margin: -0.5em; /* 5 (edit me!) */
}

.fukol-grid > * {
  flex: 1 0 5em; /* 3 (edit me!) */
  margin: 0.5em; /* 4 (edit me!) */
}

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Why we use progressive enhancement to build GOV.UK | Technology at GDS

This is a terrific read that gets to the heart of why progressive enhancement is such a solid methodology: progressive enhancement improves resilience.

Meeting our many users’ needs is number one on our list of design principles. We can’t know every different setup a person might use while building our systems, but we can build them in a way that gives all of our users the greatest chance of success. Progressive enhancement lets us do this.

The article is full of great insights from a very large-scale web project.

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

Sussex tomatoes with thyme and chive flowers from the garden.

Sussex tomatoes with thyme and chive flowers from the garden.

Saturday, May 28th, 2016

Short ribs, salad, and grilled veggies.

Short ribs, salad, and grilled veggies.

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Short ribs.

Short ribs.

Friday, April 29th, 2016

Goulash soup.

Goulash soup.

Sausage and sauerkraut.

Sausage and sauerkraut.

Strudel time.

Strudel time.

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Full English.

Full English.

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016

Doughnuts.

Doughnuts.

Sunday, March 20th, 2016

Veggies.

Veggies.

Meat’n’noodles

Meat’n’noodles

Sunday, February 28th, 2016

Shakshuka.

Shakshuka.

Saturday, February 27th, 2016

Meze plate.

Meze plate.