Tags: windows

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sparkline

Friday, October 5th, 2018

Modalz Modalz Modalz

We use too many damn modals.

Amen! This site offers some alternatives, or—if you really must use a modal dialogue—some dos and dont’s.

And remember to always ask, kids: “Why does this have to be a modal?”

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018

Switching

Chris has written about switching code editors. I’m a real stick-in-the-mud when it comes to switching editors. Partly that’s because I’m generally pretty happy with whatever I’m using (right now it’s Atom) but it’s also because I just don’t get that excited about software like this. I probably should care more; I spend plenty of time inside a code editor. And I should really take the time to get to grips with features like keyboard shortcuts—I’m sure I’m working very inefficiently. But, like I said, I find it hard to care enough, and on the whole, I’m content.

I was struck by this observation from Chris:

When moving, I have to take time to make sure it works pretty much like the old one.

That reminded me of a recent switch I made, not with code editors, but with browsers.

I’ve been using Chrome for years. One day it started crashing a lot. So I decided to make the switch to Firefox. Looking back, I’m glad to have had this prompt—I think it’s good to shake things up every now and then, so I don’t get too complacent (says the hypocrite who can’t be bothered to try a new code editor).

Just as Chris noticed with code editors, it was really important that I could move bookmarks (and bookmarklets!) over to my new browser. On the whole, it went pretty smoothly. I had to seek out a few browser extensions but that was pretty much it. And because I use a password manager, logging into all my usual services wasn’t a hassle.

Of all the pieces of software on my computer, the web browser is the one where I definitely spend the most time: reading, linking, publishing. At this point, I’m very used to life with Firefox as my main browser. It’s speedy and stable, and the dev tools are very similar to Chrome’s.

Maybe I’ll switch to Safari at some point. Like I said, I think it’s good to shake things up and get out of my comfort zone.

Now, if I really wanted to get out of my comfort zone, I’d switch operating systems like Dave did with his move to Windows. And I should really try using a different phone OS. Again, this is something that Dave tried with his switch to Android (although that turned out to be unacceptably creepy), and Paul did it ages ago using a Windows phone for a week.

There’s probably a balance to be struck here. I think it’s good to change code editors, browsers, even operating systems and phones every now and then, but I don’t want to feel like I’m constantly in learning mode. There’s something to be said for using tools that are comfortable and familiar, even if they’re outdated.

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17623 for Skip Ahead - Windows Experience BlogWindows Experience Blog

Well, Microsoft really buried the lede in this announcement:

…we will begin testing a change where links clicked on within the Windows Mail app will open in Microsoft Edge…

Yup, no matter which browser you’ve chosen to set as your default, hyperlinks will be hijacked to open with Edge. This is disgusting. It feels like a return to the shitty old days of Microsoft’s strong-arm tactics, just when Microsoft were gaining trust and respect.

Sunday, March 4th, 2018

CodePen - Instagram.exe

I’m not sure why but I genuinely love this Windows 95 style interface for Instagram coded up by Gabrielle Wee.

Sunday, February 11th, 2018

Welcoming Progressive Web Apps to Microsoft Edge and Windows 10 - Microsoft Edge Dev BlogMicrosoft Edge Dev Blog

It’s really great to hear about how Microsoft will be promoting progressive web apps as first-class citizens …but it’s really unhelpful that they’re using this fudgy definition:

Progressive Web Apps are just great web sites that can behave like native apps—or, perhaps, Progressive Web Apps are just great apps, powered by Web technologies and delivered with Web infrastructure.

Although they also give a more technical definition:

Technologically speaking, PWAs are web apps, progressively enhanced with modern web technologies (Service Worker, Fetch networking, Cache API, Push notifications, Web App Manifest) to provide a more app-like experience.

Nice try, slipping notifications in there like that, but no. No, no, no. Let’s not fool ourselves into thinking that one of the most annoying “features” of native apps is even desirable on the web.

If you want to use notifications, fine. But they are absolutely not a requirement for a progressive web app.

(A responsive design, on the other hand, totally is.)

Sunday, January 22nd, 2017

Opera Neon – The future of web browsers? | Opera

Under the hood it’s the same Blink engine that power’s the regular Opera browser (and Chrome) but I really like the interface on this experiment. It’s described as being a “concept browser”, much like a “concept car”, which is a nice way of framing experiments like this. More concept browsers please!

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Dave Goes Build - daverupert.com

I think I’ve gotten tired of Google telling me “This is how you have to build websites now.” Or Apple coming down from the mountain once a year saying “Here are the two new products you will buy this year.”

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

The Emularity « ASCII by Jason Scott

Jason documents some pretty amazing levels of emulation in JavaScript:

That’s Netscape 1.0n, released in December of 1994, running inside Windows 3.11, released in August of 1993, running inside of Google Chrome 39.0.2171.99 m, released about a week ago, on a Windows 7 PC, released in 2009.

But when it comes to trying to navigate the web with that set-up, things get a bit depressing.

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

if(version,startswith(“windows 9”) | source code search engine

This is fascinating—it looks like there might be an entirely practical reason for Microsoft to skip having a version 9 of Windows …and it’s down to crappy pattern-matching code that’s supposed to target Windows 95 and 98.

This is exactly like the crappy user-agent sniffing that forced browsers to lie in their user-agent strings.

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

The Tink Tank » Understanding screen reader interaction modes

Léonie gives a great, clear description of how screen readers switch modes as they traverse the DOM snapshot.

Saturday, December 28th, 2013

Windows of New York | A weekly illustrated atlas

Lovely little graphics inspired by New York architecture.

Monday, January 21st, 2013

The impending crisis that is Windows XP and IE 8 by Troy Hunt

A good explanation of the litany of woes that comes from Internet Explorer 8 being the highest that users of Windows XP can upgrade to. It’s a particularly woeful situation if you are a web developer attempting to provide parity. But there is hope on the horizon:

2013 will see the culmination of all these issues; support for IE 8 will drop of rapidly, users of XP will find an increasingly broken web, the cost of building software in XP organisations will increase.

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

An alternate universe – Marco.org

There is an elephant in the Microsoft store.

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

IE10 Snap Mode and Responsive Design - TimKadlec.com

Useful advice from Tim on preparing your responsive site for IE10’s new “snap mode”. Don’t worry: it doesn’t involve adding any proprietary crap …quite the opposite, in fact.

Saturday, January 7th, 2012

The Restart Page - Free unlimited rebooting experience from vintage operating systems

Wallow in nerd nostalgia and experience the Proustian rush of rebooting old operating systems.

Monday, April 11th, 2011

Windows mobile media queries

When I met up with Malarkey right before An Event Apart in Seattle he told me about a quick bit of guerrilla testing he had been doing. He popped into a store selling Windows Phone 7 devices and started surfing the web. Specifically, he started looking at sites using responsive design like Jon’s and Colly’s.

Most of the sites he looked at displayed the desktop layout instead of adapting to the smaller dimensions of the screen. That’s because the rendering engine for Windows Phone 7—some bastard hybrid of IE7 and IE6—doesn’t support media queries. So if you’re using media queries to undo width and float declarations, the media queries won’t be executed.

A better option is to begin with the layout-less version and use media queries to add in width and float declarations for the browsers that are wide enough to get that layout—this is kinda like Luke’s Mobile First approach. But if you do that, versions of Internet Explorer less than 9 won’t get those layout declarations even though the browser window is wide enough (IE9 is the first version to support media queries).

On Huffduffer I get around this problem by using conditional comments. First of all, I split off the layout styles into a separate stylesheet that is called with a media query in the link element:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/global.css" media="all">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/layout.css" media="all and (min-width: 30em)">

(This isn’t ideal because now there is an extra HTTP request, but hear me out.)

Older browsers—including plenty of mobile browsers—won’t download the layout stylesheet so they’ll just get the linearised content. That’s all well and good but it leaves Internet Explorer out in the cold. Using a conditional comment, I can point older versions of IE to the same layout stylesheet:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/global.css" media="all">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/layout.css" media="all and (min-width: 30em)">
<!--[if lt IE 9]>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/layout.css" media="all">
<![endif]-->

Now older versions of Internet Explorer also get the layout styles. This would all be fine and dandy except for the fact that Windows Phone 7 will also get the layout styles because it will understand the conditional comment. Curses!

But with one little tweak to the conditional comment, we can tell Windows Phone 7 not to follow the link:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/global.css" media="all">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/layout.css" media="all and (min-width: 30em)">
<!--[if (lt IE 9)&(!IEMobile)]>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/layout.css" media="all">
<![endif]-->

That’s why Huffduffer serves up the layout styles to desktop versions of Internet Explorer but just gives the linearised layout to Windows Phone 7 …as observed by Andy in an AT&T shop on a rainy afternoon in Seattle.

All of this should become moot by September when word has it that Microsoft will upgrade the engine of Internet Explorer Mobile to be closer to IE9. Until then, this combination of stylesheet separation and conditional comments is the most robust way I’ve found to target as many layout-capable browsers as possible.

Sunday, August 3rd, 2008

A Whole Lotta Nothing – Apple’s Blind Side

Sometimes Apple gets it wrong and Microsoft gets it right. That's certainly the case for users with low-vision.

Sunday, February 10th, 2008

AJAX and Screen Readers - Content Access Issues - The Paciello Group Blog

Steve Faulkner gives a rundown of the current state of play between screen readers and Ajax.

Thursday, January 17th, 2008

Logica Stock Icon Family debuts at Iconfactory's Stockicons.com

Clean, businesslike icons by the icon artists behind Windows XP and Ubuntu Linux.

Thursday, April 6th, 2006

Bootcampilicious

If you’re the kind of person who enjoys living under a rock, allow me to be the first to tell you that Apple have released Boot Camp Public Beta which allows Intel-based Macs to dual boot OS X and Windows XP.

My reaction, much like everyone else, was “Holy shit!”.

Blogland is awash with hypotheses and conjecture about what this means for Apple, the company. I’m a lot more selfish than that: I just care about what it means for me.

See, I was thinking about getting a cheap PC laptop. It would be nice to have a machine just for testing websites in — Virtual PC runs a mite slow. Now I’m not going to buy that laptop. Instead, this is the little bit of extra encouragement I needed to invest in a new Intel-based iMac.

Apple wins because I’m buying a Mac. Microsoft wins because I’m going to buy a license for Windows. Dell (or some other PC manufacturer) loses.

Still, I’m probably not the target audience of this move. It warms my heart to read Greg Storey’s… er, story… of a friend who’s switching. Well, maybe switching isn’t the right word anymore. Ambi-OS-trous might be more accurate.